👓 WebApp: Readtrack

Read WebApp: Readtrack (Dented Reality)
Readtrack is an experimental tool built during the 2012 NYT TimesOpen Hack Day. It gives music recommendations based on the content you’re looking at by doing semantic analysis of the current…

This is a killer start for a fun little app.

👓 Do We Still Need Braille? | shades of short shady

Read Do We Still Need Braille? by Ashley (shortshady.com)
It’s a question that’s been debated more and more as the years go by. Each January is Braille literacy month, and each year I hear arguments advocating its decline. Each time, I shake my head and ask myself again how people can be so?...

A panoply of different modalities should always be available! Of course we still need Braille.

👓 A Reading Plan for 2019 | Rhoneisms

Read A Reading Plan for 2019 by Patrick Rhone (patrickrhone.net)
Last year, I publicized my reading plan for the year. Overall, I’m very happy with the number of books I managed to read (20) and the quality of what I read. There are some aspects of the plan I wish I’d been better at but that’s a small regret. I enjoyed almost everything I picked up with few...

I like the idea of a reading plan (or personal syllabus, if you will). I’m not sure I could be as rigid about letting new titles onto my list though.

I did a miserable job of reading the non-fiction on my list this year, but did a good bit of juvenile fiction that I enjoyed. I did however read a humongous amount of online content (articles, etc.) and managed to log nearly every bit of it.

👓 A year in reading: letting the pile grow | Flashing Palely in the Margins

Read A year in reading: letting the pile grow by    (inthemargins.ca)
My year in reading has been marked by reflection on who I am and who I aspire to be, but mostly, it has been marked by a realization that I am okay, that even though I can be better, it's also okay to be who I am.

👓 Reading, Anxiety, Possibility | Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Read Reading, Anxiety, Possibility by Kathleen FitzpatrickKathleen Fitzpatrick (Kathleen Fitzpatrick)
Every so often you come across That Book, the exact thing you need to read, and a lot of the time it’s something that you might not have run into before and that you certainly had no idea you neede…

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

dismissing pleasure in reading (whether as illicit, or unserious, or whathaveyou) opens space for anxiety to become one’s dominant reading affect, and particularly “anxiety about whether we’re reading the right stuff, or reading for the right reasons, or reading in the right way.”  

👓 Announcing indiebookclub | gRegorLove.com

Read Announcing indiebookclub by gRegor MorrillgRegor Morrill (gregorlove.com)
I’m pleased to announce a new project I have been working on. indiebookclub is an app for keeping track of the books you are reading or want to read. It is primarily intended to help you own your data by posting directly to your own site with Micropub. If your site does not support Micropub yet, y...

This portends some awesome things to come. Can’t wait to get this working and see what pieces come along with it later. This is going to make it much easier to leave silos like GoodReads.com.

🔖 Identifying Modes of User Engagement with Online News and Their Relationship to Information Gain in Text by Nir Grinberg

Bookmarked Identifying Modes of User Engagement with Online News and Their Relationship to Information Gain in Text by Nir GrinbergNir Grinberg (dl.acm.org)
Prior work established the benefits of server-recorded user engagement measures (e.g. clickthrough rates) for improving the results of search engines and recommendation systems. Client-side measures of post-click behavior received relatively little attention despite the fact that publishers have now the ability to measure how millions of people interact with their content at a fine resolution using client-side logging. In this study, we examine patterns of user engagement in a large, client-side log dataset of over 7.7 million page views (including both mobile and non-mobile devices) of 66,821 news articles from seven popular news publishers. For each page view we use three summary statistics: dwell time, the furthest position the user reached on the page, and the amount of interaction with the page through any form of input (touch, mouse move, etc.). We show that simple transformations on these summary statistics reveal six prototypical modes of reading that range from scanning to extensive reading and persist across sites. Furthermore, we develop a novel measure of information gain in text to capture the development of ideas within the body of articles and investigate how information gain relates to the engagement with articles. Finally, we show that our new measure of information gain is particularly useful for predicting reading of news articles before publication, and that the measure captures unique information not available otherwise.

Bookmarked to read as result of reading The five ways we read online (and what publishers can do to encourage the “good” ones).

[.pdf] copy available on author’s site.

👓 Librarian tweetstorm by @green_grainger

Read Librarian tweetstorm by Georgia | Saoirse (Twitter)
So there was a MYSTERY at the library today.

A wee old women came in and said "I've a question. Why does page 7 in all the books I take out have the 7 underlined in pen? It seems odd."
"What?" I say, thinking she might be a bit off her rocker. She showed me, and they did.

I asked if she was doing it, she said she wasnt and showed me the new book she was getting out that she hadnt even had yet. It also had the 7 underlined! "I don't know, maybe someone really likes page 7?" I said, assuming of course that there is a serial killer in the library.

I checked some other books. Most didn't have it, but a lot in this genre did - they're "wee old women" books (romances set in wartime Britain etc). Lots of underlined 7s. The woman who pointed it out shrugged and went on her way, "just thought you should know".

My manager came back from doing arts and crafts with some of the kids and I decide to tell her about the serial killer in the library.
And that’s how I found out that a lot of our elderly clientele have secret codes to mark which books they’ve read before.

Our computers do it automatically but many have been doing it since before that was possible, so Esther might underline page 7, while Anne might draw a little star on the last page, and Fred might put an “f” on the title page. Then when they pick it up, they can check!

It’s quite clever really but now I’m dying to just underline page 7 of every new wee old women book we get in.

So, good news: there’s not a serial killer in the library whose MO include the number 7 and wartime romances. Bad news: people are defacing books rather than just asking us to scan them (smiling face with smiling eyes)

I'm now concerned that the amount of people enjoying this thread means there's going to be a new spate of readers using secret codes - apologies to librarians everywhere!
(although, in truth, I find it hard to be annoyed about it - better than torn pages and felt pen graffiti!)

(Also, I am new to the library job, hence why I hadn't seen it before! The library and our customers are great though (smiling face with smiling eyes))

Just had another victim of the page 7 vandal returned!!!
(Now checking every book that looks like it might be their taste...)

This is such an interesting little story including some cultural anthropology.

❤️ hmvanderhart tweet My 3yrold thinks all people looking at their phone are reading poems.

Liked a tweet by Hannah VanderHart Hannah VanderHart (Twitter)

👓 For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned. | New York Times

Read For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned. by Farhad Manjoo (nytimes.com)
Our tech columnist tried to skip digital news for a while. His old-school experiment led to three main conclusions.

A somewhat link-baity headline, but overall a nice little article with some generally solid advice. I always thought that even the daily paper was at too quick a pace and would much prefer a weekly or monthly magazine that does a solid recap of all the big stories and things one ought to know, that way the stories had had some time to simmer and all the details had time to come out. Kind of like reading longer form non-fiction of periods of history, just done on a somewhat shorter timescale.

🔖 Gentle Reader – Read Match Discover

Bookmarked Gentle Reader (gentlereader.com)
Gentle Reader gives you the freshest content in an easy-to-read format with no clutter and no ads. Add your favourite websites and Twitter accounts or discover new articles by exploring what other readers are bookmarking based on your interests. That way you can save time and hassle by efficiently combining RSS feeds, Twitter feeds, bookmarking and read-later services all in one app. What's more you have complete control over if, when, and how you discover new information with our unique matching function.

This is an interesting looking app. Sadly no Android version yet, so I’m taking a peek at it on the web. An interesting melange of features, but certainly not perfect for my needs yet. Has some interesting discovery type tools, but I’ll need to dig in further to test these out.

One of their default feeds, while solid, appears to only allow a synopsis sentence or two instead of the full feed, so it’s not the best example for the site to feature.

👓 Can’t Get Your News From Facebook Anymore? Try These 6 Apps | Wired

Read Can't Get Your News From Facebook Anymore? Try These 6 Apps by Josie Colt (WIRED)
Now that the social network is changing what shows up in your feed, you’ll have to go elsewhere for current news.

I’ll particularly agree with how good I find Nuzzel to be, though I will say that I do take heavy advantage of a variety of highly curated Twitter lists which I’m sure helps the algorithm for the quality of news I get back out of the system.

I would prefer more transparency about how those that use algorithms are doing so.

Some of these don’t amount to much more than glorified RSS feed readers, and I’m shocked that the state of the art of the area isn’t much further along than it was a decade ago.

👓 Owning my Online Reading Status Updates | Boffo Socko

Read Owning my Online Reading Status Updates by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
As of October 30, 2016, I’ve slowly but surely begun posting what I’m actively reading online to my blog. I’ve refined the process a bit in the last couple of weeks, and am becoming relatively happy with the overall output. For those interested, below is the general process/workflow I’m usi...

GoodReads 2017 Reading Challenge: 42 Books

I want to read at least 42 books this year.

I totally fell down on the job last year (compared to my goal), but I did read a lot of additional material online instead and lot of what I did read, (but didn’t necessarily finish toward my goal) was of a highly dense/technical nature. We’ll do better this year.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Personal Statistics from 3 Months of Internet Reading”

Read Personal Statistics from 3 Months of Internet Reading (Medium)
In the interests of cool data, I’ve collected information about every single piece of content I read on the internet (and some of the…