👓 Web as Social Network: Three Best Blogging Choices | Brad Enslen

Read Web as Social Network: Three Best Blogging Choices by Brad EnslenBrad Enslen (Brad Enslen)
This is Part 2 in a series.  Part 1 is here. In Part 1 I made the case that Facebook and Twitter had become toxic places and I suggest that blogging, micro blogging and long form blogging (either or both) on your own blog was a better choice Here in Part 2 I’m going to recommend 3 blogging platfo...
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👓 Usernames on Micro.blog | Manton Reece

Read Usernames on Micro.blog by Manton ReeceManton Reece (manton.org)
Micro.blog now has 3 distinct styles of usernames to make the platform more compatible with other services: Micro.blog usernames, e.g. @you. These are simple usernames for @-mentioning someone else in the Micro.blog community. Mastodon usernames, e.g. @you@yourdomain.com. When you search Micro.blog ...
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👓 Micro.blog + Mastodon | Manton Reece

Read Micro.blog + Mastodon by Manton ReeceManton Reece (manton.org)
For some time, we have been considering how we could open up compatibility between Micro.blog and Mastodon. Any feature that could be disruptive needs to be approached carefully. In this post I want to talk about how Micro.blog supports Mastodon, why I think it’s useful, and anticipate some questi...

There’s some awesome new functionality in micro.blog now. It looks like it’s still got some work to come, but, ideally, this is how most websites will work in the near future.

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📺 Welcome to Micro.blog | Micro.blog Help

Watched Welcome to Micro.blog from help.micro.blog
In this 2-minute screencast video, a quick overview of how Micro.blog works.

A great and very succinct video of what micro.blog is and how one can use it. They need more great documentation like this.

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👓 Webmention improvements on Micro.blog | Manton Reece

Read Webmention improvements on Micro.blog by Manton ReeceManton Reece (manton.org)
I rolled out a few Webmention improvements to Micro.blog today: Fixed the permalink for a reply when you aren’t signed in, which was preventing external sites from verifying the link after receiving a Webmention from Micro.blog. Added limited support for accepting replies from external sites that ...
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👓 Microblogging | Benjamin Esham

Read Microblogging by Benjamin Esham (esham.io)

The idea of microblogging on my own website is something I’ve been kicking around for years. Instead of posting short pieces of text to Twitter, longer pieces of text to this blog, and photos to Instagram, why not just post all of that stuff here? I could still cross-post to other sites if I wanted to, but my intention has always been that this website should represent me on the web and so it only makes sense to put all of my work here.

My microblog is a new part of this site where I’m posting the kinds of things that I posted on Twitter and Instagram. I’ll still post things on those sites for the foreseeable future, but only a subset of the things I’m posting here. You can follow my microblog using a feed reader (well, more on that later) using the links on my new feeds page.

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👓 On public criticism | Belle B. Cooper

Read On public criticism by Belle B. CooperBelle B. Cooper (blog.bellebcooper.com)
I've noticed a few posts on Micro.blog today that are clearly related to my post about leaving yesterday (though not sent to me directly). The general gist of these posts is that criticism should be done privately.
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👓 Why I’m leaving Micro.blog | Belle B. Cooper

Read Why I'm leaving Micro.blog by Belle B. CooperBelle B. Cooper (blog.bellebcooper.com)
I've come and gone from Micro.blog several times before. I joined long before the Kickstarter, when barely anyone was there. I tried it again after the Kickstarter, when the community looked more like it does today. And I came back again a few weeks ago for the most fun, if not the longest, period of time I've spent there.
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👓 The way out | Manton Reece

Read The way out by Manton ReeceManton Reece (manton.org)
There have been many articles written in the last month about the role of social networks. Some even reach the obvious conclusion: that the top social networks are too big. This interview on Slate was fairly representative, covering monopolies and centralized power. But these articles always stop sh...
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👓 Thinking about a one-sentence pitch for Micro.blog | Dan Cohen

Read Thinking about a one-sentence pitch for Micro.blog by Dan CohenDan Cohen (social.dancohen.org)
After listening to @manton on @monday with @macgenie, I think Micro.blog could use a clearer one-sentence pitch about what it is for potential new users. This is my first attempt, but it would be interesting to hear from others: “Micro.blog is an easy way to host and share your posts, photos, and even a podcast in a way that maximizes what’s great about social networks and minimizes what’s troubling about them.”
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👓 a post | Flashing Palely in the Margins | Sameer Vasta

Read a post by Sameer VastaSameer Vasta (inthemargins.ca)
[...] We like to tell ourselves that micro.blog is a great place because we are civil and we have good conversations and discussions, even when we disagree, but I have faced more dismissiveness and insult on micro.blog in the past year than I have at any time in that other “micro” social network. This is not the civil community that we make it out to be, and by pretending that it is, we ignore when people feel actively excluded. [...]
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👓 How I send webmentions to Micro.blog | Eddie Hinkle

Read How I send webmentions to Micro.blog by Eddie HinkleEddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)
If you use Micro.blog completely from the native apps, everything works smoothly. If you communicate via the IndieWeb through webmentions, everything (mostly) works smoothly. But there is a big hiccup that is still being worked out when you communicate via Webmentions to Micro.blog. The current functionality is described here, however it's not exhaustive and it doesn't work 100% of the time. Some of the issues are documented on this GitHub issue, and eventually we'll work out the best practice use case. So what if you don't care about best practices and just want to communicate with Micro.blog through Webmentions? I have a working solution on my own website. Typically in a Webmention you have a source (your post) and a target (the post you are replying to) and the Webmention endpoint used is retrieved from the target. However because with Micro.blog sometimes the target post is on Wordpress or an externally hosted blog instead of Micro.blog. This causes an issue, because if you are wanting the Webmention to be received by Micro.blog but the target post does not advertise the Micro.blog Webmention endpoint, your post will never make it in to the Micro.blog system for an externally hosted post that you are replying to. What I do is I essentially do a "cc/carbon copy" Webmention. First I do the standard Webmention sending procedure, and then I check if the target Webmention endpoint was Micro.blog's endpoint (https://micro.blog/webmention), if it is not then I know Micro.blog did not receive the post and I send an additional Webmention. The CC Webmention contains the source as my post, the target as the post I'm replying to, and it gets sent to the Micro.blog Webmention endpoint. Micro.blog does a couple of things upon receiving the Webmention. First, it checks to see if the source post is coming from a URL that belongs to a verified Micro.blog user. Second, it checks if the target post exists already in the Micro.blog system. If both of those checks go through, then it will add the new post and link it up to the correct Micro.blog user as a reply to the correct Micro.blog post. This is not necessarily an easy thing to add in most Webmention systems and is not the intended final destination of cross-site replies. But if you want it to work today, this useful hack will get it working for you.

A useful layout of the technicalities, particularly for those running their own sites and syndicating into the micro.blog network.

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