Replied to Walled gardens in disguise by Felix PleşoianuFelix Pleşoianu (Felix Rambles)
At the end of June, I subscribed to micro.blog with some amount of hope. Nine weeks later, I canceled my account. Yeah, isn't that public timeline gorgeous? All pretty photos and thoughtful posts. Surprise! It's heavily curated. To the point of being suffocating in fact. You'll never going to see th...
Wow! I feel like Felix somehow missed and misunderstands a lot of the value of micro.blog and how it really works. Perhaps they haven’t read the documentation or explored it enough? 

This reads like Felix thinks the discover feed is the entire point of the platform and not simply a tangential discovery mechanism for new users. It feels like they didn’t realize they could subscribe to anyone they wanted and that feed is the one that most people find more valuable and use regularly.

It also reads like they weren’t getting any interaction at all in terms of replies/comments. Not sure if they had a paid account (and were just using micro.blog) or if they’re using their own site and just don’t have webmentions which means they have to manually go to find interactions.

On the other hand, micro.blog is doing a tremendous amount compared to simple silos like Twitter, Facebook, and Mastodon, so I’m not surprised that some people can misconstrue what is going on or even why. A lot of how you use it depends on what resources you have when you come to it. If anything though, micro.blog is the last thing out there that’s a walled garden in the social space.

Read What’s Up With Micro Monday? by Jean MacDonald (micro.welltempered.net)
It’s been over two years since we launched the ritual of Micro Monday. The idea was to help each other find new bloggers to follow. A lot of new folks have joined the platform recently, and I’d love it if we could help welcome them with recommendations. If you use the phrase “Micro Monday” i...
Read The master tapes by Robin Sloan (Robin Sloan)
“What do I miss” is the wrong question, because the feeling isn’t an absence, but a presence.

If running your own website is like operating a nuclear reactor, then, yes: let’s give up on that. But what if it’s more like cooking dinner at home? That’s an activity that many people find challenging and/or intimidating, one with all sorts of social and economic ~encumbrances~, but even so, who would argue that it’s inappropriate to hope more people might learn to cook for themselves?
Maybe, after everything, we’ve actually ended up in a healthy place. Maybe the great gluey Katamari ball of technology has served us well. In 2020, you can, using nothing but the free app provided by Instagram, publish something very close to a multimedia magazine. Or, sitting at your laptop, you can produce a lightning-fast website all by yourself, every line of code calibrated just so, and host its files at a domain of your choosing. Or! You can do something in between, using a service like WordPress or Squarespace. This is not a bad range of options! 

There’s something between the lines here that feels like it’s closer to what the idea of IndieWeb Generations should really become. Perhaps it’s the case that when even a small handful of larger competitors like micro.blog exist it will force the larger corporate silos to come into line (they’ll lose out on market share and need to offer better service) and be more IndieWeb-like over time?
Annotated on March 21, 2020 at 11:34PM

Whether their scenario is a historical reenactment (albeit with higher-res images) or a seductive counterfactual, I don’t know. Whether it “matters,” I don’t know. I do know that I am enjoying my fraidy-follows, their slow pulse—people really are blogging, doing the dang thing—and the feeling of an old instinct waking up. 

Annotated on March 21, 2020 at 11:36PM

Read a post by Bix (bix.blog)

Manton mentioned the much-anticipated ability to show replies on your blog posts, so of course I peeked at how it worked and at least for the moment have it running here, too. I do wonder how, or I guess if, this might affect how people reply to things in Timeline, since those replies no longer are restricted to appearing in Timeline? I haven’t decided yet what my decision will be here, because I have moderation questions, but for the time being I’ll leave it active.

Watching the conversations around this new feature on Micro.blog.
Read Announcing Mimi Uploader for Micro.blog hosted blogs by Sam (samgrover.com)
I’m very excited to announce the launch and availability of my new app, Mimi Uploader. Mimi is designed from the ground up to enable super fast uploading of photos from your device to your Micro.blog hosted blogs. Utilize Mimi to upload a set of photos for making your blog post. Maybe a road trip, or a party, or memories of a special day.
Read Replies on your blog with Conversation.js by Manton Reece (manton.org)
During the project day at IndieWebCamp Austin last weekend, I built a new feature for Micro.blog that I’m calling Conversation.js. It’s a JavaScript include that lets you take a conversation on Micro.blog and drop it into your blog.
A new feature on Micro.blog.

Exploring Pine.blog

I’d noticed Pine.blog before at a previous IndieWebCamp, but not had time to delve into it very deeply. Seeing some of what Brian Schrader has been working on while following IndieWebCamp Austin remotely this weekend has reminded about the project. As a result, I’ve been spending some time tonight to check out some of the functionality that it’s offering. In part, I’m curious how similar, or not, it is to what Micro.blog is offering specifically with respect to the idea of IndieWeb as a Service which I’ve recently begun documenting. It’s always great to see the growing diversity and plurality of solutions in the space.

My brief prior experience with the platform was simply adding my website to their discovery service. Tonight I’ve found that Pine.blog has got a very pretty little feed reader experience with some fun discovery functionality. You can apparently create multiple timelines to follow content, but one needs a paid account for more than one timeline. It allows both following sites as well as recommending them to others. It also appears that Brian is supporting the rel=”payment” microformat as I see at least one feed that has a “$ Support” button in the Pine.blog interface to allow me to go to the site’s payment page to support it. I think this may be one of the first times I’ve seen this functionality in an app in the wild outside of the Overcast podcast app which added it a couple of years ago.

It has webmention support, so I can “like” things within the reader and notify others. Without a paid account I don’t see the ability to reply to or mention other sites though. It also looks like it allows for import/export of OPML too, though I haven’t tried it out yet–I can only test drive so many feed readers at a time and Indigenous is taking up all of my bandwidth at present.

I do wonder a bit about potentially importing/exporting my content if I were to go all-in on Pine.blog. I’d bet the idea is on the product map, but that’s a huge bit of work to build without a paid user base to support it. I’d personally want at least an export function if I were to change over, though I’m more likely to want to dovetail my own site with it much the way I’m currently doing with Micro.blog.

It looks like it should be able to post to my website, but I’m finding the “publish” and “preview” buttons don’t work–perhaps I need a paid account for this functionality? Of course, I only see UI to provide pine.blog with my URL and my account name, but it hasn’t authenticated using a password or other method, so perhaps that portion isn’t finished? I’ll circle back around to it later when I do a free trial. I do notice that Brian, the developer of the project, has an account on pine.blog which is mirrored on one of his subdomains running WordPress. Quirkily I’ve noticed that the header on his main website changes to alternately serve the pine.blog version and the WordPress version!

More to come as I continue exploring… Later on I’ll take a look at some of their paid functionality, but for now, it’s a pretty compelling set of features and some well-laid out user interface to start. I look forward to seeing how it continues to evolve.

Darwin Day & Attachment
unopened condition

In honor of Darwin Day: An interior page on natural selection in an unopened original of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society. Note that the octavos in the edition haven’t been cut accounting for the top of the page being curved in the picture (because of the attachment of the adjoining pages). Science changed dramatically that day.

Replied to a tweet (Twitter)
There’s lots of documentation on the IndieWeb wiki. Try this: https://indieweb.org/Getting_Started_on_WordPress and https://indieweb.org/Micro.blog#WordPress
Read Replies hosted at your own blog by Manton Reece (manton.org)
When I was first developing Micro.blog, I made a choice that quick replies in the timeline should be stored separately from regular blog posts. I thought that most people wouldn’t want replies mixed in with their blog posts at their own domain name. I also liked that replies were simple, usually s...
Hooray for micro.blog!