❤️ gozala tweet

Liked a tweet by gozalagozala (Twitter)
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❤️ benwerd tweet

Liked a tweet by Ben WerdmullerBen Werdmuller (Twitter)
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Following David Shanske

Followed David Shanske (David Shanske | The Definitive Location)
WordPress and IndieWeb developer, genius, good friend

I’ve actually been following David for ages, but since he’s slipped some following code into Syndication Links, I thought I’d send him the first follow post to attempt to take advantage of the functionality. Can’t wait to see what it looks like on his site.

🔖 Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science by Alice Domurat Dreger

Bookmarked Galileo's Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science by Alice Domurat Dreger (Penguin)
book cover of Galileo's Middle Finger by Alice Domurat Dreger

An impassioned defense of intellectual freedom and a clarion call to intellectual responsibility, Galileo’s Middle Finger is one American’s eye-opening story of life in the trenches of scientific controversy. For two decades, historian Alice Dreger has led a life of extraordinary engagement, combining activist service to victims of unethical medical research with defense of scientists whose work has outraged identity politics activists. With spirit and wit, Dreger offers in Galileo’s Middle Finger an unforgettable vision of the importance of rigorous truth seeking in today’s America, where both the free press and free scholarly inquiry struggle under dire economic and political threats.

This illuminating chronicle begins with Dreger’s own research into the treatment of people born intersex (once called hermaphrodites). Realization of the shocking surgical and ethical abuses conducted in the name of “normalizing” intersex children’s gender identities moved Dreger to become an internationally recognized patient rights’ activist. But even as the intersex rights movement succeeded, Dreger began to realize how some fellow progressive activists were employing lies and personal attacks to silence scientists whose data revealed uncomfortable truths about humans. In researching one such case, Dreger suddenly became the target of just these kinds of attacks.

Troubled, she decided to try to understand more—to travel the country to ferret out the truth behind various controversies, to obtain a global view of the nature and costs of these battles. Galileo’s Middle Finger describes Dreger’s long and harrowing journeys between the two camps for which she felt equal empathy: social justice activists determined to win and researchers determined to put hard truths before comfort. Ultimately what emerges is a lesson about the intertwining of justice and of truth—and a lesson of the importance of responsible scholars and journalists to our fragile democracy.

hat tip: Last Week at Wellesley

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👓 Quarterly Updates | Q2 2018 — WordPress

Read Quarterly Updates | Q2 2018 by Josepha (WordPress News)
To keep everyone aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress contributor teams, I’ve reached out to each team’s listed representatives. I asked each of them to share their Top Priority (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest Wins and Worries. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings.

Always interesting to read high level quarterly updates of organizations like this to see where they’re at and what they’re having trouble with.

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👓 Soon There Will Be Only One Blockbuster Left in the United States | The New York Times

Read Soon There Will Be Only One Blockbuster Left in the United States (nytimes.com)
The upcoming closings of two Blockbuster video stores in Alaska will leave one store in central Oregon as the last one in the United States.
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👓 The last Sears in Chicago is closing | MSN

Read The last Sears in Chicago is closing (MSN)
Sears is closing its final store in Chicago, the city it called home for more than a century.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

The Six Corners store, like more than 100 other Sears locations, is owned by Seritage Growth Properties, a real estate company controlled by Sears Holdings CEO Eddie Lampert. Seritage, which is publicly traded, has a market value nearly 10 times greater than Sears Holdings.  

Interesting to see the interaction between Sears Holdings and Seritage. The value is apparently all in the real estate.

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📑 Gutenberg support · Issue #190 · dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds

Annotated Gutenberg support · Issue #190 · dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds by David Shanske (GitHub)
Post Kinds consists of a few elements
  • A URL parser that takes an input URL and tries to extract it into structured data
  • Enhancements to the Post Editor to add additional structured data to the post object
  • A Taxonomy that takes that structured data and classifies it and dictates behavior
  • A rendering piece that takes the structured data stored in post meta and displays it using templates that can be overridden in the theme by including them in a subdirectory called kind_views

This is a great short description from a WordPress developer perspective of what the Post Kinds Plugin does

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👓 Last Week at Wellesley | Alice Domurat Dreger

Read Last Week at Wellesley by Alice Domurat Dreger (alicedreger.com)

The photo above was taken by my Wellesley College Freedom Project host, Mustafa Akyol, just after we came out of my lecture last Tuesday night. I’m the person second from the right. Everyone else was apparently there to protest my speaking.

Seeing this remarkable scene, I asked Mustafa if he would take that photo for me, and if we could please stay and talk with these folks rather than just leaving, and he said of course. When I then asked these students what they wanted to talk about, the apparent leader said they all didn’t want to talk to me. I asked why they’d be there if they didn’t have something to say. The leader responded with something like, “We don’t owe you anything!”

I stayed anyway, and students started to talk, to question, to challenge. We ended up staying and talking with them for about 45 minutes.

An interesting take on popular culture on college campuses in addition to a variety of other things.

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👓 These are the best coolers you can buy this summer | CNET

Read These are the best coolers you can buy this summer (CNET)
Here are our top picks out of the 12 that we tested.

I like the general design of some of the tests they did here. Glad to know why some of these expensive coolers is so high and that it’s not just design related.

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👓 WordPress Hidden Gems: Dashboard Feed Readers | Stephanie Leary

Read WordPress Hidden Gems: Dashboard Feed Readers by Stephanie Leary (stephanieleary.com)
Did you know that the Incoming Links and the two WordPress news Dashboard widgets are just RSS readers? Click “configure” in the upper right corner of each widget, and you’ll be able to change the feed to one that you choose.

Apparently this functionality got ripped out long ago because of it’s primary use. It would have been better to keep it for the feed reader portion of things though…

It’s the missing reader that’s always made WordPress a 4th class citizen in the social world.

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👓 Why “click here” is a terrible link, and what to write instead | Stephanie Leary

Read Why “click here” is a terrible link, and what to write instead by Stephanie Leary

An astonishing percentage of what I do with my clients’ web copy involves eradicating the phrase “click here” from their links. For more information, click here.

You see it everywhere. Everyone’s doing it, so it must be a best practice, right?

Wrong. It’s the worst possible practice. You should never, ever use “click here” in a web link.

Why?

“Click here” requires context.

Some good solid advice here for creating links!

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Chickened a tweet by TwoSet ViolinTwoSet Violin (Twitter)

Having created a chicken feed on my personal website really brings me a lot of joy… How can you not love this? It could have been a like or a favorite or even a jam post, but the chicken post really just transcends it all.

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