👓 Can blogs rebuild America? | Parent Hacks | Asha Dornfest

Replied to Can blogs rebuild America? by Asha DornfestAsha Dornfest (Parent Hacks)

Our blogs and the gathering spaces they created changed our world. I think we're in a moment when we can do that again.

Back in the early 2000s, we started blogs, and started talking to each other, and became friends. REAL friends. We had no idea our individual, independent contributions would link up to create a movement that revolutionized media, marketing, and the national conversation (in my case, about parenting, but on other topics, too). [Shoutout to all the conference/summit organizers who created the in-person space to cement these friendships.]

Remember what the media landscape was like back then? Traditional publishing and media was closed to most, so very few people had access to an audience. We were part of changing that. It wasn’t “influence” or “personal branding” back then, it began as community.

I have personally been been doing something similar to this for several years now, so I’m obviously a big fan of this idea. My website is my social media presence and everything I post online starts on my own website first (including this reply).

I’m excited to see so many people in the comments are into the idea as well, but it seems like several are having problems knowing where to get started or where to go. I’d suggest many spend some time to check out IndieWeb.org and the resources not only on their wiki, but within their online chat. There are a lot of us out here who have experience doing just this and can help kickstart the process, not to mention we’ve built up a huge wiki with details, tools, and processes to help others out.

Asha, if you’re game, perhaps we could set up some video chat time to help folks out?

The best part is that the old school blogosphere has been growing again and adding some cool new functionalities that make having and using a personal website a lot more fun, useful, and even simpler. Let me know how I might be of help.

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👓 Why is populism booming? Today’s tech is partly to blame | Jamie Bartlett | Opinion | The Guardian

Read Why is populism booming? Today’s tech is partly to blame by Jamie Bartlett (the Guardian)
Social media platforms are the perfect places to deny nuance in favour of extreme opinions – and we are hooked on them.
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👓 Web as Social Network: Creating the Blog Network | Brad Enslen

Read Web as Social Network: Creating the Blog Network by Brad EnslenBrad Enslen (Brad Enslen)
This is Part 3 of a series.  Part 1 is here. Part 2 is here. In Part 1, I mentioned RSS feed readers and linked to resources to help you find one.  In Part 2 I talked about blog platforms.  Now we put together a simple social network. Feed Readers RSS Feed Readers:  These are the backbone of  y...

The end of a nice, succinct three part series about starting your own web presence.

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👓 Web as Social Network: Three Best Blogging Choices | Brad Enslen

Read Web as Social Network: Three Best Blogging Choices by Brad EnslenBrad Enslen (Brad Enslen)
This is Part 2 in a series.  Part 1 is here. In Part 1 I made the case that Facebook and Twitter had become toxic places and I suggest that blogging, micro blogging and long form blogging (either or both) on your own blog was a better choice Here in Part 2 I’m going to recommend 3 blogging platfo...
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👓 Populism and Today’s Social Tech vs. Blogging | Brad Enslen

Read Populism and Today’s Social Tech vs. Blogging by Brad EnslenBrad Enslen (Brad Enslen)
The Problem: Populism and Toxic Social Networks   Social media platforms are the perfect places to deny nuance in favour of extreme opinions – and we are hooked on them, says author Jamie Bartlett Source: Why is populism booming? Today’s tech is partly to blame | Jamie Bartlett | Opinion | The ...
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👓 Gonna take a communbity to hold that back scratcher: @Tumblr to the #IndieWeb | Greg McVerry

Replied to Gonna take a communbity to hold that back scratcher: @Tumblr to the #IndieWeb by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
Import–needs rock solid LiveJournal-clone and Tumblr support if your site is to serve as an archive. I don’t know if there even is a working Wordpress plugin to import from LJ or Dreamwidth. The best-supported Tumblr->Wordpress importer is actually better than most standalone Tumblr backup tools...

I’ve never really thought about it until now, but the IndieWeb is its own fandom. Perhaps even the OG fandom?

👓 disconnected thoughts on fandom and the indieweb | privilege escalation

Read disconnected thoughts on fandom and the indieweb by MarianneMarianne (privilege escalation)
Recently I discovered the IndieWeb project, and I… think I am a lot more intrigued by it than by other Better Social Media Platform pipe dreams and decentralization projects I’ve seen? Because it’s...

I love that this post has all sorts of ideas and itches which resonate with large swaths of the growing IndieWeb. Some problems here are solved, and many remain to be worked on and improved. Either way, this has a reasonable beginning roadmap for people who are interesting in taking a crack at solving or improving on some of these problems.

I hope Marianne joins into the fray to not only make things better for herself, but for all of us. I know I and many others are happy to help on the WordPress front or otherwise. Here’s an overview video that may help some of the less technical.

It also raises some questions for me:
Do any wikis, bulletin boards/forum software send or receive webmentions yet? I receive refbacks from the IndieWeb wiki, but shouldn’t it handle sending webmentions? How about software for wikis and fora that allow for micropub or simple syndication?

It’s never dawned on me to look before, but I’ve just noticed that at least the IndieWeb wiki actually has an h-card!
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👓 I have a new website | Justin Jackson

Read I have a new website by Justin Jackson (Justin Jackson)
After 10 years on WordPress, I'm making a big change.

I do love the look and feel of this website. Great Xeroxed feel of an 80’s zine.

hat tip: Kevin Marks comment “If you want a samizdata feel, there is this layout to emulate https://justinjackson.ca/new-website”

Kevin also mentions a great photo filter for something like this at https://codepen.io/kevinmarks/pen/PyLjRv

👓 Robert Rauschenberg, Erased de Kooning Drawing, 1953 | SFMOMA

Read Robert Rauschenberg, Erased de Kooning Drawing, 1953 (SFMOMA)
From 1951 to 1953, Robert Rauschenberg made a number of artworks that explore the limits and very definition of art. These works recall and effectively extend the notion of the artist as creator of ideas, a concept first broached by Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968) with his iconic readymades of the early twentieth century. With Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), Rauschenberg set out to discover whether an artwork could be produced entirely through erasure—an act focused on the removal of marks rather than their accumulation.

I love the idea here of making art by removing things. It’s somewhat akin to removing stone in a block of marble to create a sculpture, but at the same time this is also different. I’m also reminded of the idea of a photo negative or the concept of publishing negative results in science to give us a fuller picture of an area. Translating this idea from art into broader life could be quite interesting.

Hat tip: graffiti story, body art

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👓 Saturday, November 17, 2018 | Scripting News

Read Saturday, November 17, 2018 by Dave Winer (Scripting News)
So what does a Like mean here on Scripting News? It's a way to tell me that you saw what I wrote and found it likeable. It doesn't mean you necessarily agree. You're also registering your presence to other people who read this blog. Maybe it's more like a ping? Hmmm. I know the Like icon doesn't show up in your feed reader (maybe that can change) but it may be worth a trip to my blog if you want to say hi to me and others who read this blog. That's what it means. #  

An interesting method for adding “likes” to one’s site, though I suspect that it’s entirely dependent on Twitter’s API but really only uses Twitter identity. I wonder what happens to the data if Twitter were to disappear? Is he just saving Twitter usernames?

The UI isn’t completely transparent. Am I liking something that was syndicated to Twitter from Dave’s site and also thereby indicating a like for something that exists on Twitter? Or is it just using my Twitter identity and username and saving it on that particular permalink without creating a like on my actual Twitter account that’s related to something in Dave’s account? Based on some Twitter searches, I’m guessing it’s the latter.

This is also somewhat reminiscent of my experiment last year: Adding Simple Twitter Response Buttons to WordPress Posts, though my version allowed people to retweet and reply and kept copies of the data on both my site as well as on Twitter.

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❤️ the first Drupal to Drupal conversation over webmention

Liked a post by swentelswentel (realize.be)
Milestone: the first Drupal to Drupal conversation over webmention (AFAIK)! Thanks @aleksip for testing :) https://www.aleksip.net/trying-out-the-indieweb-module #indieweb #drupal

Awesome news indeed!

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❤️ Release Candidate 1 for the Drupal Indieweb module | swentel

Liked a post by swentelswentel (realize.be)
There you go: release candidate 1 for the #drupal #indieweb module. Time for a little party! https://www.drupal.org/project/indieweb/releases/8.x-1.0-rc1
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👓 Kevin Hart Steps Down as Oscar Host | Variety

Read Kevin Hart Steps Down as Oscar Host by Kristopher TapleyKristopher Tapley (Variety)
Just 48 hours after agreeing to host the 91st Academy Awards, Kevin Hart unceremoniously stepped down late Thursday night on social media. The turn of events followed outcry over previous anti-gay tweets, and comments Hart made during stand-up routines nearly 10 years ago. Some of the tweets were feverishly deleted throughout the day on Thursday, leading to an Instagram video from the comedian that only made matters worse for him.
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👓 I Tried Predictim's AI Scan for 'Risky' Babysitters on People I Trust | Gizmodo

Read I Tried Predictim's AI Scan for 'Risky' Babysitters on People I Trust (Gizmodo)
The founders of Predictim want to be clear with me: Their product—an algorithm that scans the online footprint of a prospective babysitter to determine their “risk” levels for parents—is not racist. It is not biased.

Another example of an app saying “We don’t have bias in our AI” when it seems patently true that they do. I wonder how one would prove (mathematically) that one didn’t have bias?

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