Replied to Lets bring back the blogroll to WordPress by Michael Beckwith (Michaelbox)
Come with me as I briefly explore Blogrolls and re-introducing them in 2021 and creating a WordPress Block for their display.
I have so many ideas about this. The first one being that it’s awesome.

While WordPress is about websites, it’s also got a lot of pieces of social media sites hiding under the hood and blogrolls are generally precursors of the following/followed piece.

Blogrolls were traditionally stuck on a small widget, but I think they now deserve their own full pages. I’d love to have one with a list of all the people I follow (subscribe to) as well as a similar one with those who follow me (and this could be implemented with webmention receipts of others who have me on their blogroll). I’ve got versions/mock ups of these pages on my own site already as examples.

Next up is something to make these easier to use and import. I’d love a bookmarklet or a browser extension that I could use one click with to have the person’s page imported into my collection of links that parses the page (perhaps the h-card or meta data) and pulls all the data into the link database.

I always loved the fact that the original generated OPML files (even by category) so that I could dump the list of data from my own site into a feed reader and just go. Keeping this would be awesome, but the original hasn’t been updated in so long it doesn’t use the updated OPML spec

If such a curated list is able to be maintained on my site it would also be cool if I could export it in such a way (similar to OPML) as to dovetail it with social readers like Aperture, Yarns, or other Microsub servers to easily transport or mirror the data there.

Here are some related thoughts: https://boffosocko.com/2017/11/10/a-following-page/

I’m happy to chat about other useful/related features relating to this any time!

Replied to a tweet by Mike Rockwell
That’s what your 2006 self wanted. Your 2021 self deserves a social reader with Micropub support. You’ll get more features, a nicer UI, and more joy in your life.
Read Newsletters by Robin RendleRobin Rendle (robinrendle.com)
Newsletters; or, an enormous rant about writing on the web that doesn’t really go anywhere and that’s okay with me

Robin wins the internet today. What a great post, but all the better for the custom design and story telling layered on top!

RSS, Atom, and even h-feed are great ways to subscribe to web content. Sadly the UI has been lacking. I always appreciated Julien Genestoux‘s solution with subtome.com over the more roundabout solutions like Matt Webb’s aboutfeeds.com.

People know what a feed is, what subscription is, what a stream of content is, they just need it to be way simpler, like the click of a button that says “follow” or subscribe”.

Give it a whirl!

Or better, yet…

Liked ChRSStmas by Matthias PfefferleMatthias Pfefferle (notizBlog)
Wir haben ein kleines Weihnachtsgeschenk für euch: Matthias Pfefferle und Marcel Weiß sprechen über (fast) alle Aspekte von RSS und warum (nicht nur) für sie Feedreader und das Ökosystem rund um RSS immer noch wichtig ist. ‚Hier & Jetzt‘ kann man per RSS-Feed abonnieren und findet man natü...
What an awesome title! Merry ChRSStmas to everyone!
Read Automatically sending Webmentions from a static website by James Mead (jamesmead.org)
Using Actionsflow to automate the sending of Webmentions using webmention.app
This is an interesting way for static sites to automatically send webmentions using RSS.

Perhaps it’s something I might use in conjunction with my work with TiddlyWiki, MediaWiki, or my Obsidian.md notebook projects.

Replied to a post by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
Testing out adding email reply links to my RSS feed using the All In One SEO plugin documentation at: https://semperplugins.com/documentation/rss-content-settings.
It’s not exactly what I want yet because it doesn’t have an easy way to include the title of the post or the permalink to provide context, but it at least includes an email address.
Replied to a thread by Ian Guest, Aaron Davis, and John Johnston (Twitter)
Keeping my follows on my site as an OPML file allows me to use Inoreader for OPML subscribe. Then I can use their built-in search (and saved searches) to get information from personal websites I’m following.

Ten: A not-so “Hypothetical” Example

I use all the data I capture online using Hypothes.is to port my annotations, highlights, and notes I make online into my commonplace book.

#HeyPresstoConf20


More details and a video example:

Hypothes.is annotations to WordPress via RSS