Reply to Watched E-learning 3.0 Graph #el30 by Greg McVerry

Replied to Watched E-learning 3.0 Graph #el30 by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
Thinking about knowledge as a graph. #el30 In social analysis strength of connection represents authority? Is same true of knowledge? The more connections the truthier something is. 

Interesting. I got a refback from this post to my WordPress and IndieWeb presentation. Did you have a link to it on the page originally Greg and then delete it, or is it a spurious glitch? Very curious…

For a more on-topic comment, have you read Richard Dawkins‘ original conception of the neologism “meme” in his book The Selfish Gene (Oxford, 1976)? He’s got some interesting early examples that touch on connections and spread of information.

I’ve also recently finished reading Linked: The New Science of Networks by Albert-László Barabási which also has some interesting pieces and underlying theory (without all the heavy math) which are broadly applicable to some of these questions.

 

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👓 The Problem With Feedback | The Atlantic

Read The Problem With Feedback (The Atlantic)
Companies and apps constantly ask for ratings, but all that data may just be noise in the system.

A great framing of a lot of crazy digital exhaust that online services and apps are collecting that don’t do much. I’ve also thought for a while about the idea of signal to noise ratio of these types of data as well as their quantization levels which often don’t make much sense to me. I don’t think that there are any IndieWeb realizations of these sorts of (mostly business) systems in the wild yet, but this is an important area to begin to consider when they do.

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Reply to Taylor Jadin about planet functionality for education

Replied to a tweet by Taylor JadinTaylor Jadin (Twitter)
It was a pretty productive Open Domains Lab for me. Got my sort "funnel" site set somewhat set up using FeedWordpress. http://taylor.jadin.me/

I’m curious to hear your thoughts after using it. It sounds like it has a lot of functionality overlap with Press Forward (for WordPress). Planet-like functionality is commonly requested in the education and technology space. Are there others? Stephen DownesgRSShopper perhaps?

 

 

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👓 Weekend Reading – Rediscovering Blogging Edition | ProfHacker – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Read Weekend Reading – Rediscovering Blogging Edition by Lee Skallerup Bessette (ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education)
Blogs are back! At least, they seem to be making a resurgence as we try to disentangle ourselves from the predatory social media platforms that took all the words many of us used to write on blogs. I’ll admit, I started my own tinyletter in part because I wanted to find an audience again that was a little more personal that what gets lost in the algorithmic facebook feed and the firehose that is Twitter. My blog (which is my domain) is kind of an experiment in long-form writing now. I’m working at another Domains school, so we are thinking about how students are using their domains, owning their own data, and writing publicly.
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📅 RSVP to DTLA Mini Maker Faire 2018

RSVPed Attending DTLA Mini Maker Faire 2018

DESCRIPTION

DTLA Mini Maker Faire is back for the third time! Los Angeles is again joining a global network of Maker Faires to celebrate invention, creativity, craftsmanship, science, and the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) and Do-It-Together (DIT) culture with more diverse representations of all of the kinds of making in Los Angeles and beyond!

Proudly hosted by the Los Angeles Public Library, the DTLA Mini Maker Faire will take place at the gorgeous and historic Central Library in downtown Los Angeles (otherwise known as DTLA).

Questions? Want to talk to an organizer? Interested in becoming a sponsor? Visit our Contact page.

FAQs

Attendance is Free! Why sign up for a ticket?

Due to the limited space at the Central Library, participants are strongly recommended to register for a ticket. In addition, signing up for a ticket will help us better plan our exhibits and interactive displays so that we will have enough materials for everyone to take part and enjoy.

And there's more! All registered attendees will receive a DTLA Maker Faire sticker at check-in that will be accepted as a discount voucher at various nearby eateries. A complete list of participating stores will be provided at check-in. Also, all registered participants will be automatically entered to win a really cool prize tote at check-in. Winner will be notified via email.

Do I need to bring my ticket with me?

Yes, please bring your printed ticket or have your confirmation QR code ready on your smart device for faster check-in at the event entry.

When will DTLA Mini Maker Faire be open to the public?

It will be on Saturday, December 1, 2018, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. PST

More information at dtla.makerfaire.com.

Where can I park?

You may park in the commercial parking garage located at 524 South Flower Street.

Please enter and exit the Westlawn parking garage from Flower Street entrance; it's the first driveway, with a ramp going down. With the anticipated traffic congestion and several street closures and detours due to the construction work in the vicinity, please plan your travel time and route accordingly and allow yourself extra time to reach your destination.

When entering the garage after 9:30 a.m. and exiting by 5:30 p.m., parking is $1.00 flat rate with LAPL library card validation. To obtain a validation, you must show your Los Angeles Public Library library card at the Information Desk on the first floor. If you do not have a LAPL library card, you may apply for one on the day of the event. It's free to get a library card.

Where is the handicap parking located?

The Central Library is fully accessible to the disabled throughout the building. Flower and Fifth Street entrances have ramps.

There are two options for handicapped parking:

  1. There are two handicapped parking spaces with no meters or charge located on the south side of Fifth Street close to the Fifth Street entrance to the building for vehicles with a disabled placard.
  2. The Westlawn commercial parking lot at 524 S. Flower Street has the disabled parking symbol on its sign. The spaces are available immediately to the right as you enter the garage.

Is public transportation available?

The Metro Blue Line and Metro Red Line both have stops near Central Library. Most buses which come downtown stop near the Central Library. Check the MTA website for rates, routes, and schedules. Please note that due to the ongoing Metro Regional Connector Transit Project, Metro Rail and Bus service may be impacted.

For real-time rail and bus service information, please click here or call 323.GO.METRO

Will you have bike parking?

Yes, the Central Library has 12 U-bike racks in front of the 5th Street entrance, 4 U-bike racks on Hope Street near the library's Hope Street entrance, and there is a single-sided grid bike rack by the staircase next to the Library's Flower Street entrance.

Can I volunteer at the Mini Maker Faire?

Yes! Please contact the Volunteer Engagement Office at volunteer@lapl.orgor call (213) 228-7490.

What if it rains?

The show will go on! Only a portion of the exhibits will be outdoor. Bring rain gear to keep you dry when walking outdoors. We will have many indoor exhibits to keep the family dry.

What can I expect?

To have a fantastic time! You'll be surprised, intrigued, and inspired with every corner that you turn.

DTLA Mini Maker Faire is independently organized and operated under license from Maker Media, Inc.

I understand that by registering here, Maker Media may provide me with updates and information about Maker Faires, other events, and products of interest to the maker community. I understand that I may opt out of these communications at any time. Maker Media Privacy Policy

📅 RSVP Raising VC for “Deep Tech” Startups in Southern California | Innovate Pasadena | Friday Coffee Meetup

RSVPed Interested in Attending https://www.meetup.com/Innovation-friday-coffee-meetup/events/255836761/
Fri, Nov 2, 2018, 8:15 AM at Cross Campus Pasadena Embark Ventures is a pre-seed and seed stage fund focused on “deep tech” - companies with proprietary and highly defensible technology that is a strong competitive barrier. Particularly interested in cyber-security, robotics, advanced manufacturing, materials, and bio/med tech but open to other opportunities that have a highly technical/proprietary core. We invest early (generally first institutional round) with check sizes between $250k and $1M typically. Most of our companies are pre-product, and our goal is to get them to first customer/revenue on our round of financing. Will discuss the Southern California eco-system for “deep tech” startups and bridging the gap between R&D and engineering Peter Lee is the Founding Managing Partner at Embark Ventures, a seed stage venture capital fund based in Los Angeles focused on “deep tech” companies in industries such as robotics, advanced manufacturing, and cybersecurity. Prior to entering venture capital, he was the VP of Product at a venture backed startup in the digital media space. Peter was a manager with McKinsey and also worked as a product manager at Microsoft. Peter earned his BS and MS at MIT, and an MBA from Harvard Business School.
Replied to a tweet by e21Consortium (Twitter)

I don’t see a quick link to it, but is the @NurevaEducation “wall” available to remote attendees of #e21sym? Where do we find it?

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I’m reminded by conversations at E21 Consortium’s Symposium on Artificial Intelligence in 21st Century Education (#e21sym) today about a short essay by Michael Nielsen (t) which I saw the other day on volitional philanthropy that could potentially be applied to AI in education in interesting ways.

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🔖 E21 Consortium | Symposium

Bookmarked Symposium on Artificial Intelligence in 21st Century Education (E21 Consortium )
Join us for a day of disruptive dialogue about Artificial Intelligence and 21st Century Education in Ottawa, an annual international symposium hosted by the University of Ottawa in collaboration with Carleton University, St. Paul University, Algonquin College, La Cité, and the Centre franco-ontarien de ressources pedagogique (CFORP).

hat tip: Stephen Downes

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🔖 Approaching E-Learning 3.0 | Stephen Downes

Bookmarked Approaching E-Learning 3.0 by Stephen DownesStephen Downes (downes.ca)

The course is titled 'E-Learning 3.0' and could be subtitled 'Distributed Learning Technology'. This is a course about the next generation of learning technology. It's a broad and challenging domain that I've broken down into the following topics: data, cloud, graph, community, identity, resources, recognition, experience, agency.

I'm designing the course so that each week is one of these self-contained topics. This topic can then be approached from different directions, at different levels. The content is a starting point. I will provide a series of reflections. But I will be learning about each of these topics along with everyone else.

An online course I should take part in…

❤️ Downes tweet: The panel I’m on at #E21Sym will be live streamed any minute now

Liked Downes on Twitter by Stephen DownesStephen Downes (Twitter)
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❤️ Downes tweet: I’m at “Education in the 21st Century: A Symposium on Artificial Intelligence” today at the University of Ottawa.

Liked a tweet by Stephen DownesStephen Downes (Twitter)
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👓 Some IndieWeb WordPress tuning | EdTech Factotum

Replied to Some IndieWeb WordPress tuning by Clint LalondeClint Lalonde (EdTech Factotum)
Been spending a bit of time in the past 2 days adding some new functionality to the blog. I am making more of an effort to write more, thanks in no small part to the 9x9x25 blog challenge I am doin…

Right now, I just want to write.  

You might find that the micropub plugin is a worthwhile piece for this. It will give your site an endpoint you can use to post to your site with a variety of third party applications including Quill or Micropublish.net.
October 14, 2018 at 01:01AM

My hope is that it will somehow bring comments on Facebook back to the blog and display them as comments here.  

Sadly, Aaron Davis is right that Facebook turned off their API access for this on August 1st, so there currently aren’t any services, including Brid.gy, anywhere that allow this. Even WordPress and JetPack got cut off from posting from WordPress to Facebook, much less the larger challenge of pulling responses back.
October 14, 2018 at 01:03AM

Grant Potter  

Seeing the commentary from Greg McVerry and Aaron Davis, it’s probably worthwhile to point you to the IndieWeb for Education wiki page which has some useful resources, pointers, and references. As you have time, feel free to add yourself to the list along with any brainstorming ideas you might have for using some of this technology within your work realm. Many hands make light work. Welcome to the new revolution!
October 14, 2018 at 01:08AM

the autoposts from Twitter to Facebook were  

a hanging thought? I feel like I do this on my site all too often…
October 14, 2018 at 01:09AM

I am giving this one a go as it seems to be the most widely used.  

It is widely used, and I had it for a while myself. I will note that the developer said he was going to deprecate it in favor of some work he’d been doing with another Mastodon/WordPress developer though.
October 14, 2018 at 01:19AM

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👓 Tech suffers from lack of humanities, says Mozilla head | The Guardian

Read Tech suffers from lack of humanities, says Mozilla head by Alex Hern (the Guardian)
Mitchell Baker says firms should hire philosophy and psychology graduates to tackle misinformation

Is it just me or am I seeing a major uptick in articles defending the humanities over the past several years? I find it interesting given the political climate (at least in the United States) where it seems the sciences are under attack–at least culturally. Perhaps both are under attack, but from very different perspectives and levels.

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Reply to Doug Beal about WordCamp Los Angeles 2018

Replied to WordCamp Los Angeles 2018 #WCLAX by Douglas BealDouglas Beal (dougbeal.com)
I’ve been eyeing WordCamp Seattle. What was the most interesting presentation?

Sorry Doug, somehow you’d gotten buried in my mentions.

I’m probably not the best person to ask since I think most Camps don’t get as technical as I sometimes wish they’d be. These days there are always a session or two on Gutenberg, which is interesting, but I find myself not caring as much about. Otherwise pieces on things like phpunit or unit testing are intriguing, but I’m unlikely to actually use on a regular basis myself. I find that I know too much about the areas of marking and biz dev or social media related talks that have popped up in years past to gain much from them anymore.

For the past several years, the most interesting parts of these camps for me are about the general tenor of the overall web space. I find more value in the “hallway” track chatting with the other folks who are so inclined. Most often, I’ll also check the speakers to catch people who have traveled from distant cities–I find that if they’re developers, they’re usually offering something intriguing. As a result of these strategies I often get more out of camps than just the scheduled talks.

Your mileage may vary.