Read A Time of Self-Reflection (aria4sheriff.com)
Anarchist. Shemale. Tranny. Libertarian. “Fuck the police.” Free Talk Live. Bitcoin. Reformed Satanic Church. Black Lives Matter. It’s all there. None of it is a secret. I couldn’t possibly have been more upfront about who I am, or my position on things. Did none of you pay attention to the election two years ago, when I criticized Eli Rivera for not going far enough with his sanctuary policy? Did none of you remember the six foot tall tranny who ran for sheriff and then city council?
This sounds crazy, but I can easily imagine it in many parts of the country where people are simply just too busy to care for the “downticket” races.
Read Slideshare Scribd: How Not To Provide a Data Download by Ton Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
This morning I set out to download all my Slideshare content. As Slideshare is becoming part of Scribd this month, I’m shutting my Slideshare account down (and will shut down both the Slideshare and Scribd accounts of my company as well). Yesterday I downloaded the CSV file you get when you go to ...
I don’t think I have much there but I should look at export soon.
Read Leveraging IndieWeb to Avoid Storing Others' Data by Evgeny KuznetsovEvgeny Kuznetsov (DIMV)
Owning your own data is great. I’ve been using this website as the central IndieWeb point of my online life for over five years, and I love it. However, the joy of owning your own website comes bundled with great responsibility: as the website owner, I am responsible for what’s on my site and fo...
This didn’t work as expected on my mobile phone (no image or tooltip). 

It could be an interesting way to effect sparklines for people on one’s site as well as to do person-tags.

It’s nice not to need to store the data on one’s own website, but it also means thinking about degradation of links over time as well as needing a particular permalink (? I’ll have to look at the particular details) to have the transclusion work.

Read Soul Man (film) (Wikipedia)
Soul Man is a 1986 American comedy film about a white man who takes tanning pills in order to pretend to be black and qualify for a black-only scholarship at Harvard Law School. The film was directed by Steve Miner and stars C. Thomas Howell, Rae Dawn Chong, Arye Gross, James Earl Jones, Leslie Nielsen, James B. Sikking, and Julia Louis-Dreyfus.
I’ve  been thinking lately about how well this film has stood up to the test of time. Might be interesting to re-watch it and compare/contrast it to the Wayans’ brothers’ White Chicks with respect to the passage of time.

I also appreciate the contrast put in here with respect to Tootsie, which has a similar plot structure.

Read Jessica Krug (Wikipedia)
Krug was an associate professor of history at George Washington University (GWU) (2012–2020) until becoming the focus of controversy after she disclosed in an essay that she had lived for years under assumed racial and ethnic identities (including that of being half-Algerian-American and half-German-American and of being a Bronx-bred Afro-"boricua" (Afro-Puerto Rican) who went by the self-described "salsa" name of "La Bombalera"). In a September 3 2020 blog post, Krug confessed that: "I have eschewed my lived experience as a white Jewish child in suburban Kansas City under various assumed identities within a Blackness that I had no right to claim: first North African Blackness, then US rooted Blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx Blackness."
Read The Layered Deceptions of Jessica Krug, the Black-Studies Professor Who Hid That She Is White by Lauren Michele JacksonLauren Michele Jackson (The New Yorker)
During her scholastic career, Krug’s advisers, editors, and colleagues failed to recognize the gap between something thrown-on and something lived-in. That inattentiveness was her escape hatch.

Consider, for instance, the footage that has been circulating from a New York City Council hearing, held over Zoom in June, which shows Krug in her Afro-Latinx pose. She introduces herself as Jess La Bombalera, a nickname apparently of her own making, adapted from Bomba, an Afro-Puerto Rican genre of music and dance. Broadcasting live from “El Barrio,” and wearing purple-tinted shades and a hoop in her nose, she lambasts gentrifiers, shouts out her “black and brown siblings,” and twice calls out “white New Yorkers” for not yielding their speaking time. What stands out, though, is the way Krug speaks, in a patchy accent that begins with thickly rolled “R”s and transitions into what can best be described as B-movie gangster. This is where desire outruns expertise. The Times, in a piece on Krug’s exposure, last week, nonetheless called this a “Latina accent,” lending credence to Krug’s performance. (The phrase was later deleted.) The offhand notation is a tiny example of the buy-in Krug has been afforded her entire scholastic career, by advisers and committee members and editors and colleagues. They failed to recognize the gap not between real and faux, so much, as between something thrown-on and something lived-in. That inattentiveness was Krug’s escape hatch. 

If nothing else, this is indicative of human cognitive bias. We’ll tend to take at face value what is presented to us, but then once we “know” our confirmation bias will kick in on the other direction.

I’m curious if there were examples of anyone calling out her accent contemporaneously? We’re also stuck with the bias of wanting to go with the majority view. When you’re the lone voice, you’re less likely to speak up. This is also evinced in the story of her previous colleagues who had “gut feelings” that something was wrong, but didn’t say anything or do any research at the time.
Annotated on September 19, 2020 at 09:14AM

She introduces herself as Jess La Bombalera, a nickname apparently of her own making, adapted from Bomba, an Afro-Puerto Rican genre of music and dance. Broadcasting live from “El Barrio,” and wearing purple-tinted shades and a hoop in her nose, she lambasts gentrifiers, shouts out her “black and brown siblings,” and twice calls out “white New Yorkers” for not yielding their speaking time. 

I hear this name and immediately think “Bamboléo“! Gipsy Kings! and then this:


Annotated on September 19, 2020 at 09:30AM

Lauren Michele Jackson is a contributing writer at The New Yorker and an assistant professor of English at Northwestern University. 

This is an excellent article on its own without the context, but it is more interesting with the context on the click-thru that Jackson’s first book, the essay collection “White Negroes,” was published in 2019.

I’m curious about the editorial decision to not mention it in the mini-bio here, particularly when the piece is so pointedly about identity and authenticity.
Annotated on September 19, 2020 at 09:57AM

Read EXCLUSIVE: Education Department opens investigation into Princeton University after president deems racism 'embedded' in the school (Washington Examiner)
The Department of Education has informed Princeton University that it is under investigation following the school president's declaration that racism was "embedded" in the institution.
This seems so painfully disingenuous of the so-called “Department of Education”. They should look at themselves and their own policies first.
Read Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dead at 87 by Joan Biskupic and Ariane de Vogue, CNN (CNN)
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday due to complications of metastatic pancreas cancer, the court announced. She was 87.
Sadly, it appears that when I first visited this article there was only a headline with a notice that the story was emerging. Apparently CNN placing a timestamp online to indicate that they were breaking news, but without actually breaking much beyond the headline.
Read The 'gender critical' feminist movement is a cult that grooms, controls and abuses, according to this lesbian who escaped (PinkNews)
Butch lesbian Amy Dyess, who wrote a viral post about TERF being hate speech in 2018, tells PinkNews about her time in the 'gender-critical feminist cult'.
Doing some reading about the idea of “gender critical”…
Read a thread (threadreaderapp.com)
Read The "Stonehenge Hidden Landscape Project" Discovery of massive, Late Neolithic pit structure near Stonehenge (lbi-archpro.org)
Recent fieldwork and analysis have revealed evidence for 20 or more massive, prehistoric shafts, measuring more than 10 metres in diameter and 5 metres deep. These shafts form a circle more than 2 kilometres in diameter and enclose an area greater than 3 square kilometres around the Durrington Walls henge, one of Britain’s largest henge monuments, and the famous, smaller prehistoric circle at Woodhenge.