Read Writing is a process of discovery by Doug BelshawDoug Belshaw (Discours.es)
Unable, or perhaps unwilling, to do my usual exercise due to not being able to wear contact lenses at the moment, I sat down yesterday evening with my back to our bedroom radiator to read Stefan Zweig’s Montaigne. It’s a short book, and quite odd, in that it doesn’t really quote much from Mont...
Read - Want to Read: The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution by Eric Foner (W. W. Norton & Company)

From the Pulitzer Prize–winning scholar, a timely history of the constitutional changes that built equality into the nation’s foundation and how those guarantees have been shaken over time.

The Declaration of Independence announced equality as an American ideal, but it took the Civil War and the subsequent adoption of three constitutional amendments to establish that ideal as American law. The Reconstruction amendments abolished slavery, guaranteed all persons due process and equal protection of the law, and equipped black men with the right to vote. They established the principle of birthright citizenship and guaranteed the privileges and immunities of all citizens. The federal government, not the states, was charged with enforcement, reversing the priority of the original Constitution and the Bill of Rights. In grafting the principle of equality onto the Constitution, these revolutionary changes marked the second founding of the United States.

Eric Foner’s compact, insightful history traces the arc of these pivotal amendments from their dramatic origins in pre–Civil War mass meetings of African-American “colored citizens” and in Republican party politics to their virtual nullification in the late nineteenth century. A series of momentous decisions by the Supreme Court narrowed the rights guaranteed in the amendments, while the states actively undermined them. The Jim Crow system was the result. Again today there are serious political challenges to birthright citizenship, voting rights, due process, and equal protection of the law. Like all great works of history, this one informs our understanding of the present as well as the past: knowledge and vigilance are always necessary to secure our basic rights.

References to this book and Foner’s work Kai Wright and John Biewen‘s shows I’ve heard in the past week. [1] [2]

Read How to Show More Than 30 Custom Fields In WordPress [Quick Fix] by Damien (Make Tech Easier)
Whenever you compose (or edit) a post in WordPress, you will notice that there is a section called “Custom Field” where you can add custom variable (also known as meta-data) and value to your post. This is a very useful feature that allows you to customize each post with a custo...

This didn’t do what I wanted it to, but it did do something related that I was also missing.

Read More than THAT by Dan Cohen (dancohen.org)
“Less talk, more grok.” That was one of our early mottos at THATCamp, The Humanities and Technology Camp, which started at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University in 2008. It was a riff on “Less talk, more rock,” the motto of WAAF, the hard rock stati...

THATCamp was non-hierarchical. Before the first THATCamp, I had never attended a conference—nor have I been to once since my last THATCamp, alas—that included tenured and non-tenured and non-tenure-track faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, librarians and archivists and museum professionals, software developers and technologists of all kinds, writers and journalists, and even curious people from well beyond academia and the cultural heritage sector—and that truly placed them at the same level when the entered the door. 

I wish I’d known about them before they disappeared.

The only equivalent conference I’ve been to with this sort of diversity was the Reynolds Journalism Institute’s Dodging the Memory Hole conferences. That diversity really does make things magical.

🔖 Reinventing my blog by Brett Kosinski

Read Reinventing my blog by Brett KosinskiBrett Kosinski (The “B” Ark)
Most of what you see from me starts on my blog. Tweets, photos, or articles, I post them on my blog and syndicate. Part 1 on why and how!

Well, in the past, because I constrained myself to only writing long posts, my blog would only show activity when I was feeling motivated to write something longer. And that motivation definitely ebbs and flows.

But now, if I want to just throw up a note or post a quick picture, I can, as easily as I could post a status update to Facebook.

And instead of just posting to my blog and hoping someone sees it, I can make that content visible on social networks like Twitter, which leads to engagements that, again, come back to my blog.

The end result is that my blog, the space I’ve created for myself on the web, is much more dynamic and alive. And that’s pretty darn exciting! 

Annotated on February 26, 2020 at 08:52AM

Read a post by Bix (bix.blog)

Manton mentioned the much-anticipated ability to show replies on your blog posts, so of course I peeked at how it worked and at least for the moment have it running here, too. I do wonder how, or I guess if, this might affect how people reply to things in Timeline, since those replies no longer are restricted to appearing in Timeline? I haven’t decided yet what my decision will be here, because I have moderation questions, but for the time being I’ll leave it active.

Watching the conversations around this new feature on Micro.blog.
Read Announcing Mimi Uploader for Micro.blog hosted blogs by Sam (samgrover.com)
I’m very excited to announce the launch and availability of my new app, Mimi Uploader. Mimi is designed from the ground up to enable super fast uploading of photos from your device to your Micro.blog hosted blogs. Utilize Mimi to upload a set of photos for making your blog post. Maybe a road trip, or a party, or memories of a special day.
Read Replies on your blog with Conversation.js by Manton Reece (manton.org)
During the project day at IndieWebCamp Austin last weekend, I built a new feature for Micro.blog that I’m calling Conversation.js. It’s a JavaScript include that lets you take a conversation on Micro.blog and drop it into your blog.
A new feature on Micro.blog.
Read Walt Disney's Iger steps down as CEO, parks head Chapek to take reins (Reuters)
Walt Disney Co’s (DIS.N) Robert Iger will step down as chief executive officer, handing the reins to Disney Parks head Bob Chapek, the company said on Tuesday, ending years of speculation on who will take over Hollywood’s most powerful studio.
Read a post by Charlotte AllenCharlotte Allen (charlotteallen.info)
I can’t help but think IndieWeb principles supercede the way scientific journals operate. POSSE for discovery, webmentions for citations and peer review. No fee. We basically just need a science clone of IndieWeb.xyz

Amen! Now to get the Webmention hub that does that and get people on board… Heck, even Altmetric is doing a proprietary version of backfeed, we just need to get it out to a broader audience.

Some of this exists on the wiki in bits and pieces. We should document the idea better for the uninitiated.

Read Your Website Is Your Passport by Desmond Rivet (Desmond Rivet)
One of the themes that crops up again and again in the IndieWeb community is that your personal domain, with its attendant website, should form the nexus of your online existence. Of course, people can and do maintain separate profiles on a variety of social media platforms, but these should be subordinate to the identity represented by your personal website, which remains everyone's one-stop-shop for all things you and the central hub out of which your other identities radiate.
Part of what this means in practice is that your domain should function as a kind of universal online passport, allowing you to sign in to various services and applications simply by entering your personal URL.
A nice little primer on authorization and authentication.