LikeWar – The Weaponization of Social Media

Read LikeWar (LikeWar)
Two defense experts explore the collision of war, politics, and social media, where the most important battles are now only a click away. Through the weaponization of social media, the internet is changing war and politics, just as war and politics are changing the internet. Terrorists livestream th...
An interesting looking book, but I’m worried that it’s the sort of thing I’d start reading only to realize I’ve read all the component pieces of it in other places.
Others at with Webmentions can reply to your posts on their sites. Replies will show up in comments depending on settings. Bridgy will also find responses to your content on Twitter & syndicate those back to your website automatically.

(Give it a whirl!: Reply to any of the posts in this Twitter thread to see the comments boomerang back to the comment section of my website.)

Next we’ll want an account on Brid.gy for Twitter. This will allow us to publish from our website to Twitter; it will also allow us to reverse syndicate reactions  from on Twitter back to our posts using Webmention.

(Publishing this way will require Microformats: Your theme will need the proper microformats support to use this method, but again other methods are available.)

One could manually syndicate content from WordPress to Twitter, but there are multiple plugins and ways to syndicate it. My favorite is the Syndication Links plugin, which we can use for syndicating to other services. Install and activate.

A Micropub client idea: Liveblogging!

I’ve been thinking about Twitter threads, tweetstorms and liveblogging for the better part of the week, and last night I had an idea that has stuck with me.

With the idea of Micropub allowing the ability to create updates, why couldn’t one build (or even modify) a Micropub client to create an interface to write relatively short updates with (date and timestamps to appear in the text) that, when published, concatenated that new piece of content into a longer piece of running text to send an updated Micropub request to an article or note on a site to allow that article to become an updating liveblog post?

I’m a bit shocked that no one has done it before now, and I suspect that one of the pre-existing micropub clients out there could probably add the functionality as a one day project at an upcoming IndieWebCamp.

I don’t suspect it was the sort of Micropub functionality that Kevin Marks was thinking about doing this weekend, but Noter Live comes pretty close to having a lot of this sort of UI already. Instead of just doing a single Micropub post at the end of a Twitter thread, why couldn’t it do an initial post at the beginning and then update the site with subsequent updates as it goes along while also acting as a means of syndicating the posts to Twitter and then returning those Twitter permalinks as syndication links on the user’s own site?

Replied to a tweet by Thread Reader AppThread Reader App (Twitter)
I’m happy to see the response so far. I hope it rises above the threshold for wanting to build it into ThreadReaderApp as a feature.

I’ll note, hopefully for ease of implementation, that a Micropub solution will already allow you to post to WordPress, Drupal, WithKnown, Craft, Jekyll, Kirby, Hugo, Blot, Micro.blog and others.

There is also an open source project called Silo.pub that provides a micropub endpoint for services like Tumblr, WordPress.com, Blogger, and Twitter (among others). Aaron Parecki has a public version I’m sure he wouldn’t mind if you tried.

Other platforms could quickly allow the functionality and so much more by building their own micropub servers, which would be a major boon to the social media space and the open web. 

If you have questions about implementation while building, feel free to pop into the IndieWeb chat (where prior implementers and others) are available for help. (Alternate chat modalities including Slack and IRC are available if you prefer.)

 

IndieWeb idea for the extension of ThreadReaderApp

I’d love it if ThreadReaderApp had the ability to authenticate into my personal website and publish a copy of my own tweetstorms into my blog using Micropub

This would be a great way to leverage their existing infrastructure and to allow people to put their own Tweetstorms onto their blog and solve the perennial “Why didn’t you just blog about this” commentary. 

Replied to Apps of a Feather (Apps of a Feather)
Third-party Twitter apps are going to break on August 16th, 2018.
If Twitter doesn’t love you, the IndieWeb would. I wish Twitter clients like @tweetings @twitterrific @tweetbot @TalonAndroid would support Micropub for publishing and Microsub for reading/following. Spend a few days to convert your apps and support the independent web. #BreakingMyTwitter
 
Imagine if we could use these clients not only to interact with Twitter, but almost any website on the planet? How cool would it be if I could use Twitterific to post to my WordPress website and Dries could use Tweetbot to post to post to his Drupal site? Maybe I could dump Feedly and Inoreader and dovetail Aperture to work with Tweetings or Talon to read all the content I’m interested in?
 
Manton Reece’s Micro.blog platform is an interesting multi-use case/example that has quickly usurped lots of social functionality using IndieWeb building blocks and has a handful of posting clients while it serves as a reader as well. (And of course it still allows cross-posting to Twitter as well.)
 
Since these W3C specs are full recommendations and work on the open web with dozens of implementations, it could allow social media apps/clients like those mentioned to not only gain new audience, but give them tremendously more autonomy as businesses and prevent any future social networks from pulling the rug out from underneath them the way Twitter has done in the past. The open web can bring back true competition to the space and collectively allow the community to keep innovating and creating while they’re interacting.
 
Read Why I Quit Twitter, a List by Derek Powazek (Medium)
After 12 years and over 41,700 tweets, I’ve deactivated my Twitter account. Here’s a few reasons why.
A solid list of reasons why to quit Twitter. Someone pointed out to me that he’s actually returned since. I find that my new use from a more IndieWeb perspective is a lot happier and healthier. I ought to document how I’ve been using it lately to diminish the harms.
Bookmarked Twitter OPML Export by Luca HammerLuca Hammer (opml.glitch.me)
Get websites and RSS Feeds of the people you follow on Twitter. Import the OPML-file with your favorite feedreader.
I love nothing more than OPML related tools! I just finished exporting all of my YouTube subscriptions the other day, now I can get the RSS feeds from the websites of all the people I’m following on Twitter?! This is awesome. I’ll need to work out how I might be able to import it all into my following page.

As I look at this wonderful little app, I can’t help but think at how nice it might be if they added the SubToMe universal following button for these. I haven’t looked in a while, but it’s possible that the Feed.ly integration for SubToMe needed a tweak to get it working again.