Read More than 280 characters by Gary Pendergast (Gary Pendergast)
It’s hard to be nuanced in 280 characters. The Twitter character limit is a major factor of what can make it so much fun to use: you can read, publish, and interact, in extremely short, digestible chunks. But, it doesn’t fit every topic, ever time. Sometimes you want to talk about complex topics...
Nice mention of the influence of IndieWeb ideas of POSSE and Tweetstorm here.
Replied to a tweet (Twitter)
@withKnown supports Micropub, so you could use @ThreadReaderApp to do it in the other direction before WordPress could. 

https://boffosocko.com/2020/05/28/threadreaderapp-micropub-to-blog/
Replied to a thread by Dave Winer and @chaodoze (Twitter)
They released the feature earlier this year to work via Micropub. I wrote about their early UI here: ThreadReaderApp now has beta support for the Micropub Spec so you can publish Twitter threads directly to your blog. The nice part is that it works for a dozen or more platforms (not just WordPress) that already support Micropub.

Another interesting option is @KevinMarks’s noterlive.com which will compile your threaded tweets for cutting/pasting HTML to your site. Perhaps one day he’ll add Micropub functionality as well?

Replied to Jetpack 9.0 to Introduce New Feature for Publishing WordPress Posts to Twitter as Threads by Sarah Gooding (WordPress Tavern)
Jetpack 9.0, coming on October 6, will debut a new feature that allows users to share blog posts as Twitter threads in multiples tweets. A recent version of Jetpack introduced the ability to import and unroll tweetstorms for publishing inside a post. The 9.0 release will run it back the other way so the content originates in WordPress, yet still reaps all the same benefits of circulation on Twitter as a thread.
It’s awesome to see this feature added and that it expands the ability to do do this sort of workflow directly from one’s website instead of relying on posting to Twitter and relying on ThreadReaderApp to unroll a thread and post it to a WordPress site using the flexible Micropub specification. I’d love to see more POSSE (Post to your Own Site, Syndicate Elsewhere) syndication set ups within WordPress.

I’m hoping that future versions of this provide the Twitter permalinks for the syndicated copies there to be returned to my WordPress site for storage. In my case, I’m using the simple Syndication Links plugin which has storage and/or finds the storage location in WordPress to allow for the display of those permalinks in my post to indicate where I’ve syndicated the copies. This does two things: it’s a reminder of where my content lives elsewhere on the web (especially if I later want to go back and delete them, or to delete them if I’m deleting or making the original post private/unpublished) and it allows services like Brid.gy to find my original post and backfeed replies to the Twitter versions back into the comments section of my post using the Webmention spec (via the Webmention plugin and the Semantic Linkbacks plugin).

Read A White Male Professor Reportedly Faked Being a Woman of Color, This Time to Troll Scientists on Twitter (Jezebel)
Somehow, beyond all reason and understanding, another person has been caught pretending to be a woman of color. At least this time around, the story has an extra fucked-up layer. Anonymous internet sleuths uncovered Professor Craig Chapman, who teaches chemistry at the University of New Hampshire, posing as a woman of color on Twitter under the name The Science Femme. According to The New Hampshire, Chapman was brought down by his own hubris when he tweeted about his brother’s brewery from both his fake account and his real account. The Science Femme and Chapman’s personal account have both been deleted, but unluckily for him, screenshots exist.
A good reminder that I really should unsubscribe to “people” I don’t know personally or have an exceptionally high expectation of who they really are and what content I’m actually consuming.
Replied to a thread by Nicholas Rempel and Adam Greenough (Twitter)
I need to go back and revise it a bit, but I built a bit of UI for doing just this with Webmention: https://boffosocko.com/2017/12/24/adding-simple-twitter-response-buttons-to-wordpress-posts/

The other piece requires being able to thread conversations. Details for that here: https://boffosocko.com/2018/07/02/threaded-conversations-between-wordpress-and-twitter/

Replied to @-mention when posting to Twitter · Issue #527 · snarfed/bridgy by Stephen Paul WeberStephen Paul Weber (GitHub)

Twitter interprets microsyntax whenever you post. There's no way around it. So if you have a post whose plain text says "Blah blah with @singpolyma" there is no way to tell twitter that "@singpolyma" is not the user named "singpolyma" and it will notify said user no matter what. In a silo this works, but when bridging to a federated environment it can cause issues (and especially annoyance of Twitter users).

One way to deal with this is to have my local implementation detect any such cases and not bridge them to Twitter, but this is not ideal. What should brid.gy do if it is asked to post something with the text @singpolyma in it? Here is my proposal:

  1. For the source HTML @singpolyma I would suggest changing it to "@ singpolyma", however I could see an argument to also leave it as-is, since some users might be writing plain-text microsyntax and expecting it is always going to Twitter? Hmm.
  2. For the source HTML @<a href="https://twitter.com/singpolyma">anything</a> put "@singpolyma" into the tweet.
  3. For the source HTML @<a href="https://singpolyma.net">anything</a> put "@ singpolyma.net" into the tweet.

Thoughts?

Not necessarily a permanent solution for all platforms and microsyntaxes depending on the number of syndicated copies, but potentially a clever stopgap for those who may need it. 

One can use a zero-width space (using something like &#8203;in their HTML) between the @ and a twitter user name on the original post and the syndicated copy will not have the traditional @mention link or notification functionality. 

Here’s an example

This reply can also serve as a test for the functionality within Github where I’ll “tag” both @kylewm and @​snarfed, but if it works, Ryan shouldn’t be auto-linked or notified.

Here’s a reminder that the call for submissions to #HeyPresstoConf20 are still open until September 3rd. Join this WordPress and ClassicPress online conference which happens only on Twitter.

Read OMG! Twitter release an OFFICIAL conversations API! by Terence Eden (shkspr.mobi)
One of the most requested Twitter API features is now available – the ability to get replies to a Tweet as a thread.
Long time readers know that I’ve long been a fan of Visualising Twitter Conversations in 2D Space. But up until now you had to use horrible hacks to get the data. As trailed in th...
Replied to a tweet by Aram Zucker-ScharffAram Zucker-Scharff (Twitter)
#IndieWeb to the rescue. There are a few great options for this. None of which should require you to write any code! 

One of my favorite is Kevin Marks’ Noter Live (open source) which is great for live tweeting and creating long threads quickly, especially at conferences. When you’re done, it’s kept a record of everything which you can quickly cut/paste as HTML into your website for an instant archive post.

Another option if your website supports the Micropub spec (perhaps with a plugin?) ThreadReaderApp recently added support to let you unroll the thread and you can go to your account and authenticate to your website and post the thread with one click.

I’ll also note that WordPress’ Gutenberg just added the ability to unroll threads to websites built with it as well. 

In addition to general public use, these could actually be the backbone of an interesting journalistic live notebook for reporters in the field who could quickly compile/archive their threads for expanded articles later on.

Liked a tweet (Twitter)
Great to see a conference realize that Twitter can be toxic and coming up with an interesting solution for it. 
Read Unroll Your Twitter Threads Into WordPress by Gary Gary (The WordPress.com Blog)
Turn your recent Twitter thread into your next blog post.
I’m curious if they were following the recent functionality added by ThreadReaderApp using Micropub? I’m guessing the fact that they used the verb “unroll” means they were at least aware of it as a functionality.