👓 Why I’m Leaving Medium | Praxis – Medium

Read Why I’m Leaving Medium by Tiago Forte (Praxis – Medium)
I’ve been writing on Medium for three and a half years.

Some of these reasons are very pragmatic for everyone, but he’s also got some business specific ones that touch on things many small businesses would want control over as well. He additionally points out some very subtle changes in media for people who are reaching out to niche audiences. Some of this is reminiscent to things Leo Laporte has spoken about in the past with respect to leaving television and cable to start a podcast network, except in that case there really wasn’t a huge amount of competing media, so instead of moving to silos (which didn’t exist at the time for his use case) he went straight to using his own platform.

👓 Social media detox: Christina Farr quits Instagram, Facebook | CNBC

Read I quit Instagram and Facebook and it made me happier — and that's a big problem for social media by Christina Farr (CNBC)
Christina Farr used to spend 5 hours a week posting and interacting with friends on Instagram. She quit cold this summer, and her life changed dramatically for the better.

👓 Pausing Twitter | Pernille Ripp

Read Pausing Twitter by Pernille RippPernille Ripp (Pernille Ripp)
Please change my Twitter password…
These were the words I texted my husband on November 18th as I traveled home from NCTE.  Exhausted yet fulfilled, I knew my brain needed a break from the constant stream of learning that Twitter provides me with.  Take a break fully in order to be more present ...

👓 I quit Instagram and Facebook and it made me a lot happier — and that’s a big problem for social media companies | Stephen Downes

Read I quit Instagram and Facebook and it made me a lot happier — and that's a big problem for social media companie by Stephen DownesStephen Downes (downes.ca)
This is yet another example of a genre called "quit lit". It's the post someone writes when they've quit something. These days, what they're mostly likely quitting is social media like Facebook and Twitter. Both have become toxic, serving a bottomless bowl of trivial content, abuse, and advertising. And yet, until the day they quit, people keep going back. But this trend is accelerating - when I quit Facebook more than two years ago, it was unthinkable, but now it's a phenomenon that threatens the company's bottom line. How can they fix it? I'm not sure they can.

👓 How to Delete Facebook | The New York Times

Read How to Delete Facebook (New York Times)
Lost faith in Facebook after data leakages, breaches and too much noise? Here’s a guide to breaking up with the social network and its photo-sharing app for good.

You know things are bad for Facebook when the New York Times is publishing tutorial how-to’s about how to delete Facebook.

👓 Become A Facebook-Free Business | Signal v. Noise

Read Become A Facebook-Free Business by DHH DHH (Signal v. Noise)

If Facebook’s endless privacy scandals have shown one thing, it’s that the company has far too much data on its users, and that they can’t be trusted not to sell, barter, or abuse that data whether for profit, growth, or negligence.

While individuals have long been rallying around , there hasn’t been a comparable campaign for business. Enter: The Facebook-Free Business.

Just like when companies began putting Facebook and Twitter bugs on their websites and in advertising, you know it’s getting serious in the other direction when businesses are talking about leaving Facebook.

I wish BandCamp a lot of luck in also leaving Medium to get rid of that last Facebook like bug.

There is a lot to like about companies behaving ethically like this. I’m much more likely to trust a company (especially those talking about my data and privacy) if they can behave this way.

👓 Walt Mossberg, Veteran Technology Journalist, Quits Facebook | The New York Times

Read Walt Mossberg, Veteran Technology Journalist, Quits Facebook by Daniel Victor (New York Times)

Mr. Mossberg has spent decades chronicling the privacy implications of Facebook’s policies. On Monday, he opted out.

Walt Mossberg is far from alone in giving up on Facebook. But as a leading technology journalist who has spent decades chronicling the impact of Silicon Valley’s policies, his exit from the social network speaks louder than most.

This is a HUGE silo quit! There are few who watch the technology sector so closely as Walt Mossberg has for the past several decades.

Since it will be gone soon, I’ve archived a copy of his Facebook post.

👓 Why I deleted my popular Twitter account | USA Today

Read I deleted my Twitter account. It's a breeding ground for thoughtlessness and contempt. by Glenn Harlan Reynolds (USA TODAY)
Twitter is poison to American political discourse. Can't we find a more worthy pastime?

A very solid reason for quitting social media, and particularly Twitter.

❤️ facebook | notiz.Blog

Liked Facebook by Matthias PfefferleMatthias Pfefferle (notiz.Blog)
In den letzten 4…5 Jahren hab ich immer wieder mit dem Gedanken gespielt meinen facebook Account zu löschen. Mein Account hatte wirklich wenig persönliches und ich habe ihn fast ausschließlich dazu benutzt, meine Blogposts zu teilen. Der einzig plausible Grund der mich noch daraun gehindert hat...

Congratulations Mathias!

👓 How to Delete Facebook and Instagram From Your Life Forever | New York Times

Read How to Delete Facebook and Instagram From Your Life Forever by Brian X. ChenBrian X. Chen (nytimes.com)
Lost faith in Facebook and Instagram after data leakages, breaches and too much noise? Here’s a guide to breaking up with the social network and its photo-sharing app for good.

Not as in-depth and informative as I would have expected. I had kind of hoped for more history and background, but this is sort of cut and dried. The fact that there’s an article of this sort in the New York Times does signal a turning point for the quit Facebook movement.

👓 Social.coop | Discours.es

Read Social.coop by Doug BelshawDoug Belshaw (discours.es)
I deleted my account on the Mastodon instance social.coop yesterday. I still don't fully understand what went down, but here's some details from [...]

Just goes to show you that a social media silo doesn’t need to be a big platform run by a corporation.

Reminds me of Kevin Marks’ tweet the other day:

👓 It’s time to say goodbye to Twitter | sonniesedge

Replied to It's time to say goodbye to Twitter by sonniesedgesonniesedge (sonniesedge.co.uk)

When I first got on Twitter it was like usenet in the 90s. Just a bunch of people talking shit about things that they enjoyed. It was small enough that everyone seemed to know each other, but large enough that there were still interesting nerdy people to find and get to know and enjoy the company of. The perfect little club.

But at some point it went horribly wrong.

I hope that as you wean yourself away from Twitter that you regain the ability to do longer posts–I quite like your writing style. This is certainly as well-put a statement about why one should leave Twitter as one could imagine.

I remember those old days and miss the feel it used to have as well. The regrowing blogosphere around the IndieWeb and Micro.blog are the closest thing I’ve seen to that original feel since ADN or smaller networks like 10 Centuries and pnut. I enjoy finding that as I wean myself away from Twitter, I do quite like going back to some of the peace and tranquility of reading and thinking my way through longer posts (and replies as well). Sometimes I wonder if it doesn’t take more than ten minutes of thought and work, it’s probably not worth putting on the internet at all, and even then it’s probably questionable… I’m half tempted to register the domain squirrels.social and spin up a Mastodon instance–fortunately it would take less than the ten minute time limit and there are enough animal related social silos out there already.

As an aside, I love the way you’ve laid out your webmentions–quite beautiful!

👓 I’m joining the campaign to deactivate my Twitter account on August 17 | BoingBoing

Read I'm joining the campaign to deactivate my Twitter account on August 17 by Mark Frauenfelder (Boing Boing)
I deleted my Facebook account a few months ago and am not sorry I did. For the last couple of months, I've been thinking about deleting my Twitter account, too. It has become a creepy, toxic place. I'm stunned that Twitter has no problem with people who want to inflict additional misery on the parents of murdered children. It's not about the first Amendment. Twitter is a company -- it can choose whomever it wants to be on its platform. As my friend Sean Bonner posted, Twitter "didn’t start as an open forum for free speech, it started as a way for people to see what their friends were doing. Enforcing the same rules for everyone to promote civil discourse isn’t censorship. Bots spewing hate and attacking people isn’t fun." He's right. I'm joining Sean and others on August 17 by deactivating my Twitter account. The hashtag for this action is #DeactiDay. If Twitter doesn't fix its hate enabler problem in 30 days, I won't reactivate my account, after which it will be permanently deleted. It's very likely it will be deleted, because Twitter has demonstrated that it badly wants Alex Jones and his ilk on its platform. When CNN reported that Jones violated at least a dozen of Twitter's rules after Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Jones hadn't and therefore couldn't be kicked off, Twitter didn't do a thing about it. Then Twitter admitted that Jones had indeed violated rules that had resulted in bans for other people, but said it wouldn't ban Jones. Twitter can have Jones, and I'll be happy to be the hell away from the place.

I’ve been watching lots of folks jumping ship over the past weeks and months. I think I could be in for just exactly this. I’ve already got my own website that handles all of my personal content and some great interaction at micro.blog. I’ll even help build sites for others who need a place to go to from Twitter, please ping me at my site. #deactiday

Reply to 50cent tweet about Instagram abuse

Replied to a tweet by 50cent (Twitter)

Why rely on yet another corporation that may do the same? Come join the !
#ownyourdata

🎧 Episode 3: Freedom from Facebook | Clevercast

Listened to Episode 3: Freedom from Facebook by Jonathan LaCourJonathan LaCour from cleverca.st

This time on clevercast, I discuss my departure from Facebook, including an overview of how I liberated my data from the social giant, and moved it to my own website.

Here are some of the tools that I mention in today’s episode:

Also check out my On This Day page and my Subscribe page, which includes my daily email syndication of my website activity.

There’s a lot going on here and a lot to unpack for such a short episode. This presents an outline at best of what I’m sure was 10 or more hours of work. One day soon, I hope, we’ll have some better automated tools for exporting data from Facebook and doing something actually useful with it.