Given Google’s history of killing Reader in a possible attempt to help empower their G+ product, does anyone else see their getting rid of email subscriptions from FeedBurner as a play at an upcoming Newsletter service/app/feature?

It’s suspicious that in a time with increased interest in paid Newsletters, they’d be giving this sort of love to an old project.

Context from a recent Google email:

FeedBurner has been a part of Google for almost 14 years, and we’re making several upcoming changes to support the product’s next chapter. Here’s what you can expect to change and what you can do now to ensure you’re prepared.

Starting in July, we are transitioning FeedBurner onto a more stable, modern infrastructure. This will keep the product up and running for all users, but it also means that we will be turning down most non-core feed management features, including email subscriptions, at that time.

For those who use FeedBurner email subscriptions, we recommend downloading your email subscribers so that you can migrate to a new email subscription service.

For many users, no action is required. All existing feeds will continue to serve uninterrupted, and you can continue to create new accounts and burn new feeds. Core feed management functionality will continue to be supported, such as the ability to change the URL, source feed, title, and podcast metadata of your feed, along with basic analytics.

Read Domain of One’s Own by Karlheinz Pape (Corporate Learning Community)
Eher zufällig bin ich auf den Workshop der Medienwerkstatt von Studiumdigitale der Uni Frankfurt M am 23.3.2021 zum Konzept der „Domain of One’s Own“ für Studenten gestoßen. Die Idee hat ganz viel …
Great to see some DoOO material in German/Germany.

In Deutschland ist bisher noch keine Anwendung bekannt
Die HOOU Hamburg Open Online University fördert derzeit ein DoOO Projekt. Projektmitarbeiter sind Christian Friedrich und Katharina Schulz. (Beide haben auch den Workshop an der Uni Frankfurt gehalten). Das Projekt hat eine Webseite: https://domain-of-ones-own.de/. 

Rough translation:

So far no application is known in Germany

The HOOU Hamburg Open Online University is currently funding a DoOO project. Project team members are Christian Friedrich and Katharina Schulz . (Both also held the workshop at the University of Frankfurt). The project has a website: https://domain-of-ones-own.de/ .

Annotated on April 11, 2021 at 05:43PM

Read “Domain of One’s Own” für alle Learning Professionals? by Karlheinz Pape (Corporate Learning Community)
Wir sind inzwischen alle auch zu Bewohnern dieses “Neulands” Internet geworden. Die meisten von uns sind dort als Mieter unterwegs und posten bei anderen Eigentümern. Wer im Internet eine Domain be…

What does this have to do with learning?
We have always made notes while studying. In the past only for ourselves. Today it is becoming more and more common to share these notes with others, which becomes easy when you take the notes digitally. If many share their thoughts, then I get a lot of suggestions. My development goes faster, see also this blog post about it .
“If I want to work on a new topic, I write a blog post about it.” I’ve heard it from quite a few. This public writing forces me to confidently verify what I have said. After all, I don’t want to embarrass myself. That means I need three times as much time for the blog post as if I just wrote it down for myself. This extra time spent working on the topic is learning time. And when I publish the post, I give others the chance to benefit from it as well – and the chance to receive feedback that will help me advance on the topic.
My contributions can be text contributions, videos, podcasts or slides. I can link to sources. And I can find it again in my domain – even after years. And when I’ve shared it, others can search for it and use it too. 

Rough translation via Google Translate ^^

This is a good description about how working in public can be beneficial to oneself, even if no one else is looking.
Annotated on April 11, 2021 at 05:37PM

Read Opinion: Gavin Newsom's French Laundry scandal is no reason to toss him out (CNN)
Lincoln Mitchell writes that though California Gov. Gavin Newsom has made mistakes during the Covid pandemic, he has not done anything that rises to the level of prematurely removing from office.
My friend Dave Harris asked me about this article.

In general, I’d say that the Republican party is trying to rile up something where nothing truly exists. They’re feebly trying to inflame Democrats to “cancel” Newsome so they have a shot of getting a Republican in office. Sadly, the unwritten subtext here is that if a Republican were actually governor during the pandemic, California would have just followed suit with the Trump administration and fared far worse as a result. Where is their position on that?!

It would be nice if, instead of being against something like they are in this case, the Republicans would state what they’re proactively for—and preferably something that would improve the lives of all Californians. We know that they’re against Newsome and a progressive agenda, but why not tack a bit toward the middle and actually accomplish something instead of continually trying to split us all apart?

Their push on this front is simply an attempt at creating a wedge issue at the lowest level when there are so many, many other things that are more important right now. If they couldn’t as a party and we couldn’t as a country agree on the far more egregious aggressions of Donald Trump, then nit picking at Gavin Newsome is going to be a losing proposition, especially in California.

Read - Finished Reading: Blue Lightning (Shetland Island, #4) by Ann Cleeves (Minotaur Books)
Detective Inspector Jimmy Perez brings his fiancée home to Fair Isle, a birder's paradise, where strangers are viewed with suspicions and distrust. When a woman's body is discovered at the island's bird observatory, the investigation is hampered by a raging storm that renders the island totally isolated. Jimmy has to find clues the old-fashioned way, and he has to do it quickly. There's a killer on the island just waiting for the chance to strike again.
This didn’t have quite as slow a start as some of the others.
 
A painful but solid ending. Best of the series so far, though perhaps because of knowing the characters so well now.
 
The ending was a bit of a gut punch even though I’d seen much of the end of the tv series, though I don’t think that Fran figured in any of it and Cassie was played as a teenager rather than a 6 year old. The writing was solid enough to rush us through some action pieces that might not have otherwise played out as logically looking back at things in a more quiet manner. In particular several characters could have blurted out some facts in the final minutes to prevent additional deaths.
 
Again Cleeves leaves us in just an interesting spot in the closing paragraphs to push us to read the next book.
 
Rating: