Read Reply: Auto-XYZ by Kicks Condor (Kicks Condor)
Yup—this is great. Feel free to just syndicate everything to Indieweb.xyz. It looks like there are some percent-20 characters I need to clean up and I should try to show your posts in chronological order—so this has already been great for catching problems. One thing to keep in mind is that your...
Liked a tweet by Johan BovéJohan Bové (Twitter)

Just wait until your friends start complaining when they realize that the SEO on their names and photos is ruined by your website ranking so far above their own websites and social.

Read Hello, Indieweb! by Matt (offtopica.uk)
After reading a few blog posts from Jamie Tanna, I have recently become interested in the IndieWeb. I like it because you can own all of your own data while still connecting with others. The IndieWeb is a people-focused alternative to the "corporate web". Microformats Firstly I decided to implement ...

Congratulations!

Read The Search for Isaiah Nixon by Hank Klibanoff (The Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project)
The Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project opened its fall 2015 semester with C-SPAN in the classroom, taping the class for its American History TV series, which you can find here. The project ended the semester with a Wall Street Journal article explaining how students in the class discovered the long-lost gravesite of a Georgia man, Isaiah Nixon, who was killed in 1948 because he voted.
Read Primus E. King (1900-1986) by Craig Lloyd (New Georgia Encyclopedia)

On the morning of July 4, 1944, Primus E. King, an African American duly registered to vote in Georgia, sought to cast a ballot at the Muscogee County Courthouse in Columbus in the Democratic Party's primary election. Shortly after entering the courthouse, King was roughly turned away by a law officer who escorted him back out to the street. During this time the Democratic Party monopolized political activity in Georgia, as in other southern states, and the party's primary provided the only occasion in which a voter was offered a choice between candidates seeking offices in state and local government. For this very reason blacks were denied participation in the primaries by the Georgia Democratic Party and its county affiliates.

Listened to "Buried Truths" Pistols (Season 1, Episode 1) by Hank Klibanoff from NPR

Cover art for Buried Truths from WABE/NPR featuring a brown toned blurry/digitized image of an unidentified African American man superimposed with the title of the show so as to disguise the person's identity.

After Primus King, a black barber and pastor, successfully sued the Democratic Party for denying his right to vote on the grounds of race and color, three-term Georgia Governor Eugene Talmadge declared, "This is a white man's country and we must keep it so." The best way to do so: "Pistols."

Listened to "Buried Truths" Fall, Isaiah, Fall (Season 1, Episode 2) by Hank Klibanoff from NPR

Cover art for Buried Truths from WABE/NPR featuring a brown toned blurry/digitized image of an unidentified African American man superimposed with the title of the show so as to disguise the person's identity.

Election day is usually a grand occasion for a small town like Alston, GA. For the white people in town, September 8, 1948, marked a day of good ole traditions and community. But for black voters, it became a place of opportunity...and defiance.

Liked a tweet by Justin JohanssonJustin Johansson (Twitter)
Bookmarked Food As Power: an Alternative View by Jeremy Cherfas (ARROW@TU Dublin)
Abstract:

Lost, sometimes, in the more metaphorical interpretations of food and power is the basic crudity of food as stored energy. Muscles turn the chemical energy stored in food into mechanical energy, which enables work to be done. Power is the rate of doing work. Food, literally, is a store of power. In the wake of World War Two, Europe faced a shortage of coal and oil, the two most important sources of chemical energy that threatened to gum up the transport of goods from place to place. There was, however, no shortage of unemployed men. Geoffrey Pyke, the quintessential British boffin, pointed out that people are actually much more efficient than steam engines at converting chemical energy to mechanical energy. Pyke’s proposal, that trains could be moved by cyclo-tractors, locomotives powered by the muscular effort of twenty to thirty men, themselves powered by sugar, went nowhere. The paper looks at the background to Pyke’s proposal, its reception at the time and the future of food-powered machinery.

Testing out Malcolm Blaney's relatively new Unicyclic feed reader. Very clean and simple! I love that it handles Twitter feeds in a much more natural way than any of the big corporate feed readers out there. Of course the fact that it supports micropub is also a major bonus! IndieWeb tools FTW!

Bookmarked Unicyclic (unicyclic.com)

Unicyclic.com is a social feed reader, which means you can subscribe to feeds and then reply to, like, or share what you're reading from the reader.

If you have your own website, you can use it to log in right here using IndieAuth. If you also support Micropub, all your interactions here will be posted back to your own site.

If you don't have your own website you can also create an account on this site and then log in here. Local accounts will also receive notifications sent from other sites via webmention, including from Twitter via brid.gy.



Unicyclic.com was created by Malcolm Blaney and is powered by a content management system called dobrado. You can also download the software from there and run it on your own server. If you need any help getting started, please use this contact form. If you're interested in following updates to the software please add my blog to your reader. Thanks for visiting!