👓 Opinion | Michael Bloomberg: Why I’m Giving $1.8 Billion for College Financial Aid | New York Times

Read Opinion | Michael Bloomberg: Why I’m Giving $1.8 Billion for College Financial Aid (New York Times)
Let’s eliminate money problems from the admissions equation for qualified students.

God bless you Michael Bloomberg for putting your money where your mouth heart is. We could use more serious leadership and thought like this in the world.
#2020

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Bloomberg gives Johns Hopkins a record $1.8 billion for student financial aid | Washington Post

Read Bloomberg gives Johns Hopkins a record $1.8 billion for student financial aid (Washington Post)
Former New York mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced Sunday he is giving a record $1.8 billion to Johns Hopkins University to support student financial aid at his alma mater and make its admissions process “forever need-blind.” The gift, believed to be the largest private donation in modern times to higher education, is a landmark in a growing national movement to make elite universities more accessible to students from low-to-middle income families.
Syndicated copies to:

👓 Michael Bloomberg donates $1.8 billion to boost financial aid for low-income students | CBS News

Read Michael Bloomberg donates $1.8 billion to boost financial aid for low-income students (cbsnews.com)
Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York and one of the world's richest people, is donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, in an effort to boost financial aid for low- and middle-income students. The university said the contribution — the largest ever to any education institution in the U.S. — will allow Johns Hopkins to eliminate student loans in financial aid packages starting next fall. The university will instead offer scholarships that don't have to be repaid.
Syndicated copies to:

📺 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets | Warner Bros. (2002)

Watched Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets from Warner Bros.
Directed by Chris Columbus. With Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Richard Harris. An ancient prophecy seems to be coming true when a mysterious presence begins stalking the corridors of a school of magic and leaving its victims paralyzed.

As soon as I saw the license plate IMDOBBY this afternoon, I knew it was a sign that I should watch the second Harry Potter today.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 How WhatsApp Destroyed A Village | BuzzFeed

Read How WhatsApp Destroyed A Village (BuzzFeed News)
In July, residents of a rural Indian town saw rumors of child kidnappers on WhatsApp. Then they beat five strangers to death.

This was a really well researched and laid out piece of journalism. Social companies are going to need some serious government regulation to help fix issues like these. They obviously can’t be trusted to self-regulate.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Trio | Khürt Williams

Read TRIO by Khürt Williams (islandinthenet.com)

We’ve all heard of the rules of thirds but have you heard of the rule of three?

The rule of three is a writing principle that suggests that a trio of events or characters is more humorous, satisfying, or effective than other numbers in [the] execution of the story and engaging the reader. The reader or audience of this form of text is also thereby more likely to remember the information conveyed. This is because having three entities combines both brevity and rhythm with having the smallest amount of information to create a pattern. It makes the author or speaker appear knowledgeable while being both simple and catchy.WIKIPEDIA

Although a writing principle, one of my photography instructors, Loren Fisher, has suggested using this principle when composing images with more than one object of focus.

I’ve been trying to use this principle in my images.

This image was captured earlier this year near South Street Seaport during my lunch break. I used my Fuji X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR and shot using an ACROS Film Simulation Recipe by Ritchie Roesch.

Some interesting theory about both photography and narrative structure with a great little photo to underline it all.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Category Theory Seminar: Winter 2016 | John Carlos Baez

Bookmarked Category Theory Seminar: Winter 2016 by John Carlos Baez (math.ucr.edu)
Here are the notes from a basic course on category theory. Unlike the Fall 2015 seminar, this tries to be a systematic introduction to the subject. A good followup to this course is my Fall 2018 course. If you discover any errors in the notes please email me, and I'll add them to the list of errors. You can get all 10 weeks of notes in a single file here: You can get the LaTeX files created by Nelson and García Portillo here. Their typeset version was based on these handwritten versions:
Syndicated copies to:

👓 Category Theory Course | Azimuth | John Carlos Baez

Bookmarked Category Theory Course by John Carlos Baez (Azimuth)
I’m teaching a course on category theory at U.C. Riverside, and since my website is still suffering from reduced functionality I’ll put the course notes here for now. I taught an introductory course on category theory in 2016, but this one is a bit more advanced. The hand-written notes here are by Christian Williams. They are probably best seen as a reminder to myself as to what I’d like to include in a short book someday.
Syndicated copies to:

📺 Ali’s Wedding (2017) | Netflix

Watched Ali's Wedding (2017) from Netflix
Directed by Jeffrey Walker. With Osamah Sami, Don Hany, Helana Sawires, Robert Rabiah. After a "white lie" which spirals out of control, a neurotic, naive and musically gifted Muslim cleric's eldest son must follow through with an arranged marriage, except he is madly in love with an Australian born-Lebanese girl.

A great little uplifting picture with a lot of heart and some great laughs. Some really good acting from a broad cast. Definitely a film that fits in with the changing culture of the time period we’re living in. I’d recommend it.

Syndicated copies to:

📑 Open as a Set of Values, Not a Destination | Billy Meinke

Annotated Open as a Set of Values, Not a Destination by Billy Meinke (billymeinke.com)
the technology platforms we rely on are changing and to leave things the way they are is to put our work at risk.  
Syndicated copies to:

👓 Open as a Set of Values, Not a Destination | Billy Meinke

Read Open as a Set of Values, Not a Destination: Keynote for Open Education Ontario Summit 2018 by Billy MeinkeBilly Meinke (billymeinke.com)
This is the transcript from a keynote delivered November 11th at the Open Education Ontario Summit in Toronto. Thanks to David Porter, Jenni Hayman, Terry Greene, Lillian Hogendoorn, Ali Versluis, Jessica O’Reilly, and Lena Patterson for facilitating a smooth, engaging event and for giving me the opportunity to share some big, difficult ideas with the Open Rangers.
Syndicated copies to:

🔖 Introduction to Category Theory | UCLA Continuing Education

Bookmarked Introduction to Category Theory (UCLA Continuing Education)

This course is an introduction to the basic tenets of category theory, as formulated and illustrated through examples drawn from algebra, calculus, geometry, set theory, topology, number theory, and linear algebra.

Category theory, since its development in the 1940s, has assumed an increasingly center-stage role in formalizing mathematics and providing tools to diverse scientific disciplines, most notably computer science. A category is fundamentally a family of mathematical obejcts (e.g., numbers, vector spaces, groups, topological spaces) along with “mappings” (so-called morphisms) between these objects that, in some defined sense, preserve structure. Taking it one step further, one can consider morphisms (so-called functors) between categories. This course is an introduction to the basic tenets of category theory, as formulated and illustrated through examples drawn from algebra, calculus, geometry, set theory, topology, number theory, and linear algebra. Topics to be discussed include: isomorphism; products and coproducts; dual categories; covariant, contravariant, and adjoint functors; abelian and additive categories; and the Yoneda Lemma. The course should appeal to devotees of mathematical reasoning, computer scientists, and those wishing to gain basic insights into a hot area of mathematics.

January 8, 2019 - March 19, 2019
Tuesday 7:00PM - 10:00PM
Location: UCLA
Instructor: Michael Miller
Fee: $453.00

The new catalog is out today and Mike Miller’s Winter class in Category Theory has been officially announced.

Oddly, it wasn’t listed in the published physical catalog, but it’s available online. I hope that those interested in mathematics will register as well as those who are interested in computer science.

Syndicated copies to: