Another really clever reimagining of the @Hypothes_is UI from @peterhagen_. Lots of color! A graph of annotations over time! And you can annotate on the page.

Try it at https://annotations.lindylearn.io/page/?url=https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1945/07/as-we-may-think/303881/

Alternate Hypothes.is UI featuring the Atlantic article As We May Think with rainbow colored highlights on one side and annotations to the right. At the top is a graph of the article's popularity showing the number of annotations over time.

Replied to a tweet (Twitter)
If you’re curious about doing this from digital to print, you’ll find some interesting pointers/ideas at these two links:

Replied to a tweet by @Tania_UXDs (Twitter)
@BorisAnthony has some prior art: http://boris.libra.re/library/?i=color
Maybe this should be a session at the upcoming IndieWebCamp pop up on personal libraries

A Domain of One’s Own for use as a personal Learning Management System (pLMS)

I love that Johannes Klingbiel’s article Building a new website highlights having his own place on the Internet as a means to learn.

To learn—A rather obvious one, but I wanted to challenge myself again. 

While I suspect that part of the idea here is to learn about the web and programming, it’s also important to have a place you can more easily look over and review as well as build out on as one learns. This dovetails in part with his third reason to have his own website: “to build”. It’s much harder to build out a learning space on platforms like Medium and Twitter. It’s not as easy to revisit those articles and notes as those platforms aren’t custom built for those sorts of learning affordances.

Building your own website for learning makes it by definition a learning management system. The difference between my idea of a learning management system here and the more corporate LMSes (Canvas, Blackboard, Moodle, etc.) is that you can change and modify the playground as you go. While your own personal LMS may also be a container for holding knowledge, it is a container for building and expanding knowledge. Corporate LMSes aren’t good at these last two things, but are built for making it easier for a course facilitator to distribute and grade material.

We definitely need more small personal learning management systems. (pLMS, anyone? I like the idea of the small “p” to highlight the value of these being small.) Even better if they have social components like some of the IndieWeb building blocks that make it easier for one to build a personal learning network and interact with others’ LMSes on the web. I see some of this happening in the Digital Gardens space and with people learning and sharing in public.

[[Flancian]]’s Anagora.org is a good example of this type of public learning space that is taking the individual efforts of public learners and active thinkers and knitting their efforts together to facilitate a whole that is bigger than the sum of it’s pieces.

Having been studying Welsh for a while, this video about how it informed J.R.R. Tolkien’s creation of Elvish languages for his fiction was fascinating.

The fact that he uses the word Nazgûl [~““35:51] from the Irish (nasc) and Scots Gaelic (nasg) words meaning “ring” to take a linguistic dig at Irish is notable. He was probably motivated by his political views of the time rather than celebrating (as one should) the value and diversity of all languages.

Tolkien once termed Welsh ‘the elder language of the men of Britain’; this talk explores how the sounds and grammar of Welsh captured Tolkien’s imagination and are reflected in Sindarin, one of the two major Elvish languages which he created.

Via https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/medieval-welsh. For those interested on Tolkien, they’ve got a huge list of other scholarly content on his work: https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/keywords/tolkien.

Watched "Ghosts" Sam's Mom from Paramount+
Sam's Mom: Directed by Katie Locke O'Brien. With Rose McIver, Utkarsh Ambudkar, Brandon Scott Jones, Danielle Pinnock. Sam and Jay travel to where Sam's mother, Sheryl (Rachael Harris), died to see if she's now a ghost. Also, Sasappis divulges a secret to his fellow ghosts that he overheard Sam and Jay discussing.
Nice to see an episode move out and away from the main setting of the house, but it’s not really bringing the funny.
Watched "Ghosts" Who Do You Think You Are? from HBO Max
Who Do You Think You Are?: Directed by Tom Kingsley. With Lolly Adefope, Mathew Baynton, Simon Farnaby, Martha Howe-Douglas. Cash-strapped Alison and Mike think their dreams have come true when they inherit a grand country house, unaware that it's falling apart and teeming with the ghosts of former inhabitants.
Watching the credits of the American remake, I noticed the British roots and had to go back to see the source material. Perhaps not too shockingly, it’s an almost exact remake. The chamber maid has turned into a flower child and the caveman(?) has turned into a Viking, but almost everything in the original has been moved directly into the remake. 

Poorly reflecting on the remake, I think the original is actually funnier, though I do like the Viking character in the remake more.

I was a bit surprised to find the original airing on HBO Max instead of BritBox.

Watched "Ghosts" Alberta's Fan from Paramount+
Alberta's Fan: Directed by Nick Wong. With Rose McIver, Utkarsh Ambudkar, Brandon Scott Jones, Danielle Pinnock. Alberta is thrilled when a super-fan visits the mansion; Thorfinn convinces Hetty to go on a walk that would hopefully spark a special memory.
I was waiting for the hammer to fall on this one and it went the other direction. 
Watched "Ghosts" D&D from Paramount+
D&D: Directed by Nick Wong. With Rose McIver, Utkarsh Ambudkar, Brandon Scott Jones, Danielle Pinnock. After Jay is kicked out of a Dungeons and Dragons game with his city friends, Sam agrees to facilitate a new one between him and the ghosts; Isaac confronts his feelings for Nigel, a ghost from whom he's been keeping a gigantic secret.
This show isn’t good at handling the vast amounts of context that Jay is missing in the conversations with the ghosts. He just sits there not showing how uncomfortable things really must be for himself and it makes him seem so much less human.
Replied to a thread by @mizminh and @MikeKra36812131 (Twitter)
@mizminh @MikeKra36812131 These notebooks were often historically called commonplace books, zettelkasten, waste books, florilegia, etc.
Replied to a tweet by dragonman225 (Twitter)
@dragonman225 This looks like a lot of the affordances made possible by the open source @Hypothes_is project whose data can also be ported to Obsidian, Roam, or your favorite note-taking app.
Example: https://via.hypothes.is/https://julian.digital/2020/09/04/a-meta-layer-for-notes/
See also: https://boffosocko.com/2020/08/29/a-note-taking-problem-and-a-proposed-solution/
cc: @julianlehr