Following Ryan Boren

Followed Ryan Boren (Ryan Boren)
Ryan Boren

non-compliant neurodivergent

I am a retired software developer, former lead developer of WordPress, and co-conspirator emeritus at Automattic. I live in Dripping Springs Texas at the Irie Smial Preserve amidst a familial motley of non-compliant, neurodivergent garage hobbits.

Check Twitter and Micro.blog for my heartbeat. That’s where I hang out the most.

WordPress, Education, moral edtech, even the words commonplace book in the tagline of one of his websites! I suspect that Ryan is my online doppleganger.

It also looks like he’s thinking about and doing some of the same things that Aaron Davis, Ian O’Byrne, John Johnston, Greg McVerry and others are doing.

Syndicated copies to:

Following David Shanske

Followed David Shanske (David Shanske | The Definitive Location)
WordPress and IndieWeb developer, genius, good friend

I’ve actually been following David for ages, but since he’s slipped some following code into Syndication Links, I thought I’d send him the first follow post to attempt to take advantage of the functionality. Can’t wait to see what it looks like on his site.

Following Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Followed Kathleen Fitzpatrick (Kathleen Fitzpatrick)

Kathleen FitzpatrickKathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Digital Humanities and Professor of English at Michigan State University. Prior to assuming this role in 2017, she served as Associate Executive Director and Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association, where she was Managing Editor of PMLA and other MLA publications. During that time, she also held appointments as Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU and Visiting Professor of Media at Coventry University. Before joining the MLA staff in 2011, she was Professor of Media Studies at Pomona College, where she had been a member of the faculty since 1998.

Fitzpatrick is author of Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy, which was published by NYU Press in November 2011; Planned Obsolescence was released in draft form for open peer review in fall 2009. She is also the author of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television, published in 2006 by Vanderbilt University Press (and of course available in print). She is project director of Humanities Commons, an open-access, open-source network serving more than 13,000 scholars and practitioners in the humanities. She is also co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she led a number of experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing. She serves on the editorial or advisory boards of publications and projects including the Open Library of the Humanities, Luminos, the Open Annotation Collaboration, PressForward, and thresholds. She currently serves as the chair of the board of directors of the Council on Library and Information Resources.

For further information, please see my CV.

I notice that Kathleen is practicing a lot of web principles similar to those in the IndieWeb community including syndication and adding syndication links, but she’s missing out on some of the additional goodies like Webmention support. Some pieces I suspect she’s come by very naturally, while others have a very micro.blog centric feel to them.

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Following Brad Enslen

Followed Brad Enslen (Brad Enslen)

Brad Enslen avatar of a jackolanternSocial commentary on current affairs, politics, social norms, civics, civility, legal and moral issues of the day. Also includes, discussion of culture, history, technology, computers, the Web and Indieweb movement. The web presence of Brad Enslen, containing both long form weblog posts and micro blog posts.


I am a New Urbanist real estate developer, as a partner in a small development in the USA.

Online Bio. Past:  In the late 1990’s I ran a banner exchange network dedicated to science fiction and fantasy websites. Later, I developed several niche web directories and forum communities devoted to science fiction, fantasy, horror, spy/espionage fiction genres.  This was still back when search engines were not very good and human edited directories were best for navigating the web.

I was a moderator at several SEO and webmaster forums: Searchking forums, SearchGuild and Spider Food.

Sometime in the early 00’s I started blogging, when blogging was the “new thing”.

Then Real Life intruded and instead of trying to build the Web I became a spectator, as it became commercial, slick, corporate and boring.

Present: Now I am back to blogging and micro blogging again.

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Following Dean Shareski

Followed Dean Shareski (ideasandthoughts.org)

Someone recently described me by saying, “If you want to learn from Dean, don’t follow him on twitter but read his blog instead” I thought that was a fair statement. This is the place where I’m pretty serious, or at least focused on my passion of learning and how to make better schools for our kids. Twitter? That’s a different story.

I’m the Community Manager for Discovery Education Canada since 2012. From 2002-2012, I worked as a Digital Learning Consultant with the Prairie South School Division in Moose Jaw, SK, Canada. Previous to that I taught grades K-8 for 14 years. I specialize in the use of technology in the classroom. I hold a Masters of Education in Communications and Technology through the University of Saskatchewan. I also am a sessional lecturer for the University of Regina. Since late 2004 I’ve been immersed in understanding what the Read/Write Web is all about and how the new shape of knowledge changes how we all learn. I believe teachers and students ought to use technology to connect ideas and learners in safe, relevant, authentic ways to answer questions, share ideas and develop community. Learning can be, and should be, fun and personal. I was fortunate to be awarded the 2010 ISTE Award for Outstanding Leadership in Technology and Education. This honor is mostly a reflection of the great people I work with both within my school division and beyond. My greatest asset is that I know smart people and how to find them.

I’ve been fortunate to work with Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach and Will Richardson in varying roles for the Powerful Learning Practice. This company offers a unique professional learning experience for educators around the world. It has been a great learning experience for me as I help create community and learning in virtual spaces and help teachers change practice to improve learning for students.

I mostly blog here but occasionally for Tech and Learning Magazine and the Huffington Post as well as on the DEN blogs.

In 2016, I published a book called “Embracing Cultures of Joy” which details and summarizes my work and belief around a topic that best describes my beliefs around learning and community.

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Following Kicks Condor

Followed Kicks Condor (kickscondor.com)

Microchips and mods gratify me greatly

I first discovered the Techs-Mechs who are a clan of South of the border Gundam breaking own immagration fences with their impressive manos mecanicas

A short time later, I made the indieweb.xyz.

The creator of indieweb.xyz.

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Following My Favorite Theorem by Kevin Knudson and Evelyn Lamb

Followed My Favorite Theorem by Kevin Knudson and Evelyn Lamb (kpknudson.com)
University of Florida mathematician Kevin Knudson and I are excited to announce our new math podcast: My Favorite Theorem. In each episode, logically enough, we invite a mathematician on to tell us about their favorite theorem. Because the best things in life are better together, we also ask our guests to pair their theorem with, well, anything: wine, beer, coffee, tea, ice cream flavors, cheese, favorite pieces of music, you name it. We hope you’ll enjoy learning the perfect pairings for some beautiful pieces of math. We’re very excited about the podcast and hope you will listen here, on the site’s page, or wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes will be published approximately every three weeks. We have a great lineup of guests so far and think you’ll enjoy hearing from mathematicians from different mathematical areas, geographic locations, and mathematical careers.

Following Caliphate

Followed Caliphate (New York Times)

A new audio series following Rukmini Callimachi as she reports on the Islamic State and the fall of Mosul. This series includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence.

I’ve sampled several episodes via The Daily, so I’m officially subscribing so I can get the rest of the episodes.

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Following Michael Levin

Followed Michael Levin (ase.tufts.edu)

Investigating information storage and processing in biological systems

We work on novel ways to understand and control complex pattern formation. We use techniques of molecular genetics, biophysics, and computational modeling to address large-scale control of growth and form. We work in whole frogs and flatworms, and sometimes zebrafish and human tissues in culture. Our projects span regeneration, embryogenesis, cancer, and learning plasticity – all examples of how cellular networks process information. In all of these efforts, our goal is not only to understand the molecular mechanisms necessary for morphogenesis, but also to uncover and exploit the cooperative signaling dynamics that enable complex bodies to build and remodel themselves toward a correct structure. Our major goal is to understand how individual cell behaviors are orchestrated towards appropriate large-scale outcomes despite unpredictable environmental perturbations.

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Following WorkLife with Adam Grant

Followed WorkLife with Adam Grant: A TED original podcast (ted.com)

You spend a quarter of your life at work, so shouldn’t you enjoy it? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant takes you inside some of the world’s most unusual workplaces to discover the keys to better work. Whether you’re learning how to love criticism or trust a co-worker you can’t stand, one thing’s for sure: You’ll never see your job the same way again.

Each weekly episode of WorkLife with Adam Grant centers around one extraordinary workplace – from an award-winning TV writing team racing against the clock, to a sports team whose culture of humility propelled it to unexpected heights. In immersive interviews that take place in both the field and the studio, Adam brings his observations to vivid life – and distills useful insights in his friendly, accessible style.

“We spend a quarter of our lives in our jobs. This show is about making all that time worth your time,” says Adam, the bestselling author of Originals, Give and Take, and Option B with Sheryl Sandberg. “In WorkLife, we’ll take listeners inside the minds of some fascinating people in some truly unusual places, and mix in fresh social science to reveal how we can lead more creative, meaningful and generous lives at work.”

Malcolm Galdwell talked to Adam Grant in a bonus episode of Revisionist History. He seems interesting and the topic of work life is intriguing. I’ll bite and sample some episodes.

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Following John Cooke

Followed John Cooke (Marwyn and John)

John retired from an interesting and (mostly!) enjoyable career at the University of Edinburgh covering teaching, research, being an Associate Dean responsible for students and curriculum matters across the Faculty/College and as an administrator.

John was educated at a local primary school and the grammar school attended previously by his parents. Trinity College, Cambridge provided a fine university education; this was followed by studies for a PhD in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh. The thesis was titled “Radial velocities of faint galaxies from objective prism plates” – I know, I know

Retirement still doesn’t allow enough time to do everything but amateur radio and music have flourished, John is back on a bike and has time to mess about with websites. He loves making things, whether it’s with wood, electronic components or software.

Marwyn retired from teaching modern languages and guidance at a series of interesting schools over her career.

Following Adam Procter

Followed Adam Procter (adamprocter.co.uk)

designer-practitioner-researcher

I'm the Programme Leader for BA (Hons) Games Design & Art and Senior Teaching Fellow at Winchester School of Art (WSA). I sometimes get the chance to make Apps, Web stuff and work as UX and UI designer, developer and consultant.

I run the research-led teaching programme BA (Hons) Games Design & Art and am responsable for the programme structure, ethos, recruitment and attainment of all students. I teach across a wide range of games subject areas in all years as well but my main teaching revolves around year 3 and the development of final projects which can be viewed here http://winchester.games. I keenly teach both the academic theory and the practical application.

"Most learning is not the result of instruction. It is rather the result of unhampered participation in a meaningful setting." — Ivan Illich

The area I  mainly research is connected technology and edutech. I am investigating how to design tools for design education and the digtial medium via connected devices. My focus is on ethical, delightful design practice that embraces the studio culture. I am keen on open education, open practice and co-ops. This research is currently within the structure of a Webscience PhD, you can keep up to date at researchnot.es.