Following The Literature and History Podcast

Followed The Literature and History Podcast by Brad Metzger, Ph.D.Brad Metzger, Ph.D. (literatureandhistory.com)
Literature and History is a free podcast, covering Anglophone literature from ancient times to the present. It includes summaries, analysis, historical background and original music.

I’ve now listened to a couple of episodes and they’re truly fantastic! While I would have expected a lot more focus on the literary, I’m actually even more impressed that Doug focuses so heavily on the history and context of the pieces as a means of gaining entry to them and the times from which they stem. What a truly phenomenal bunch of work he’s done!

Indie Digital Media by Richard MacManus

Followed Indie Digital Media by Richard MacManus (Indie Digital Media)

For creators & fans of independent digital media

A new blog by our friend Richard MacManus has not only hit the digital presses, but there are several posts up already. Like most of what he writes, this looks like it will also be required reading. I suspect it’ll also be of interest to the broader IndieWeb community as well.

Seeing this also reminds me to finish compiling a list I had started based on one of our conversations about topic-specific indie blogs.

Following Post Reports | Washington Post

Followed Post Reports (Washington Post)

Post Reports cover art Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered.

This looks to be like the New York Times’ The Daily Podcast which I enjoy quite a bit. I’m putting into my podcast rotation to sample it for a bit.

Subscribed to Buried Truths | NPR via WABE 90.1

Followed Buried Truths by Hank KlibanoffHank Klibanoff (NPR.org via WABE 90.1)

In 1948, three black farmers decided they'd had enough. They were going to vote in rural South Georgia, where white supremacists held power by suppressing the black vote. Pulitzer-Prize winning author, journalist and Emory University professor Hank Klibanoff explores the mysteries and injustices of history through civil rights cases that few have seen. How far would white supremacists go — on the streets, in the courtrooms, in the legislatures — to preserve their racial dominance? And, most importantly, why? Who were we back then? The truth is restless, relevant and revealed in Buried Truths.

Subscribing at the recommendation of John Biewen who has been promoting it on the front end of his new season of Scene on Radio (on the topic of Men). How could I not listen after his stupendous season of episodes on race and culture entitled Seeing White last year?

Following My Url Is

Followed My Url Is (myurlis.com)

My Url Is features a new guest every two weeks to talk about how they got involved with the IndieWeb and what hopes, goals and aspirations they have for the community and for their website. The guests are a combination of those both new to the IndieWeb and those who have helped build it from the beginning.

An awesome new podcast by Eddie Hinkle with an IndieWeb flavor!

Following Derek Powazek

Followed Derek Powazek (Derek Powazek)

It's pronounced poe-WAH-zek.

Derek Powazek has worked the web since 1995 at pioneering sites like HotWired, Blogger, and Technorati. He is the author of “Design for Community: The Art of Connecting Real People in Virtual Places” (New Riders, 2001). He is the cofounder of JPG, the photography magazine that’s made by its community. He has been Chief of Design for HP’s MagCloud, advisor to a handful of startup companies, and creator of Fray, the magazine of true stories and original art.

Following Stephen Downes

Followed Stephen Downes (downes.ca)

Stephen Downes is a specialist in online learning technology and new media. Through a 25 year career in the field Downes has developed and deployed a series of progressively more innovative technologies, beginning with multi-user domains (MUDs) in the 1990s, open online communities in the 2000s, and personal learning environments in the 2010s. Downes is perhaps best known for his daily newsletter, OLDaily, which is distributed by web, email and RSS to thousands of subscribers around the world, and as the originator of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), is a leading voice in online and networked learning, and has authored learning management and content syndication software.

Downes is known as a leading proponent of connectivism, a theory describing how people know and learn using network processes. Hence he has also published in the areas of logic and reasoning, 21st century skills, and critical literacies. Downes is also recognized as a leading voice in the open education movement, having developed early work in learning objects to a world-leading advocacy of open educational resources and free learning. Downes is widely recognized for his deep, passionate and articulate exposition of a range of insights melding theories of education and philosophy, new media and computer technology. He has published hundreds of articles online and in print and has presented around the world to academic conferences in dozens of countries on five continents.

I’d been following several of Stephen’s web properties previously, but I’m adding his Half an Hour site as well as his Mastodon instance today.

Following Rosemary Orchard

Followed Rosemary Orchard (rosemaryorchard.com)
Rosemary OrchardI am working at the Technische Universität Wien developing in house software solutions. I studied French and German as foreign languages at university in the UK and lived in France, Germany and Austria as part of my degree program. I now live and work in Vienna, Austria.

Met virtually at IndieWebCamp New York.

Following Catherine Cronin

Followed Catherine Cronin – open educator, open researcher, educational developer (catherinecronin.net)

I’m Catherine Cronin — open educator, open researcher and educational developer in CELT (Centre for Excellence in Learning & Teaching) at the National University of Ireland, Galway. My work focuses on open education, critical approaches to openness, digital identity practices, and exploring the interplay between formal and informal learning. In my recently completed PhD, I  explored the use of open educational practices (OEP) in higher education.

I am a member of the advisory board of the Open Education Working Group and a regular contributor to conversations and collaborative projects in the area of open education, within Ireland and globally. My academic background includes a BSc Mechanical Engineering, MEng Systems Engineering, and MA Women’s Studies (Gender & Technology). I’ve been involved in teaching, research and advocacy in higher education and in the community for over 25 years. Recent work, apart from my OEP research, includes creating an Open Education guidefor faculty and staff, collaborating to create the Equity Unbound curriculum, engagement in the global #icollab network, and facilitating workshops on open educationdigital identity, and digital wellbeing for educators and learners in different settings.

Please click on the link to my Blog or Contact above – or join in conversation with me on Twitter at @catherinecronin.

Following John Eckman

Followed John Eckman (Open Parenthesis)

John Eckman blogs here about Open Source, the Next Generation Internet, the Assembled Web, and Web Application Strategy, Design, and Development. He also works at Optaros.

I’m the CEO of 10up, a digital agency focused on designing and building compelling, content-centric experiences on open source platforms, especially WordPress.

Why is this blog called Open Parenthesis?

It’s meant to bring together two key concepts that have dominated my professional career – writing and coding:

1. Parentheses in writing are often used to insert explanatory text not directly related to the main point (see the wikipedia entry). (I did a PhD in literature & culture, and spent years teaching in a university English environment).

2. Parentheses in software development are used for a variety of reasons in different languages, but often they’re used to pass parameters to functions (or to indicate the parameters a function receives). (I’ve spent the last decade working in software development, specifically on the web).

The site’s called “Open Parenthesis” (the singular of parentheses) because the idea is that the conversation is open ended.

It starts an explanatory insertion (like this one), but it can’t yet be closed.

It resembles a function taking parameters, but we can’t yet close the parentheses because we don’t know yet what the possibilities are.

Finally, there’s also the notion of “Open” because I’m focused on open source software, as well as open-ness and transparency of conversation in general.

Following Paul Jacobson

Followed Paul Jacobson (Paul Jacobson)

I am an experienced writer, content marketer and strategist with some experience in project management. My career spans legal services, content marketing (with emphasis on the social Web) and business development. I have more than a decade’s experience in social marketing (social media driven marketing) and was South Africa’s first social media legal expert.

I am also an amateur photographer. My photography is one of my primary forms of personal expression that is partly about documenting my life and experiences and partly about sharing ideas and concepts.