Read The Very Best Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe (The Kitchn)
Growing up, I thought there was only one way to make a chocolate chip cookie. You started with the yellow bag of Nestlé Toll House chocolate morsels, followed the directions on the back, and nine to 11 minutes later you were rewarded with a tray of warm cookies. Simple as that. Fast forward 20 years, and there are now more recipes for chocolate chip cookies than I’d ever have a chance to make in my lifetime (although I’d be down to try). To distinguish themselves from the competition, they all claim to be the best, whether that’s because they’re the easiest, or the most flavorful, or the chewiest, or the softest.
Not quite the article I was searching for, but relatively interesting nonetheless. One would expect Alton’s cookies to be best here…
Annotated Cookbooks may make good timeful texts by Andy Matuschak (Andyʼs working notes)
I don’t think the right answer is to use something like the Mnemonic medium to memorize a cookbook’s contents. I think a likelier model is: each time you see a recipe, there’s some chance it’ll trigger an actionable “ooh, I want to make this!”, dependent on seasonality, weather, what else you’ve been cooking recently, etc. A more effective cookbook might simply resurface recipes intermittently over time, creating more opportunities for a good match: e.g. a weekly email with 5-10 cooking ideas, perhaps with some accompanying narrative. Ideally, the cookbook would surface seasonally-appropriate recipes. Seasonality would make the experience of “reading” a cookbook extend over the course of a year—a Timeful text. 
Indigenous peoples not only used holidays and other time-based traditions as a means of spaced repetition, but they also did them for just this purpose of time-based need. Winter’s here and the harvest changes? Your inter-tribal rituals went over your memory palace for just those changes. Songs and dances recalled older dishes and recipes that hadn’t been made in months and brought them into a new rotation.

Anthropologists have collected examples of this specific to hunting seasons and preparations of the hunt in which people would prepare for the types of game they would encounter. Certainly they did this for feast times and seasonal diets as well. Indians in the Americas are documenting having done things like this for planting corn and keeping their corn varieties pure over hundreds of years.

Read Sweet smells of success emanate from the Gourmet Cobbler Factory and Clifton’s BBQ by Frier McCollister (Pasadena Weekly)
When we hear about how the pandemic and ensuing lockdown has affected local “industry” we might not have been thinking of the Gourmet Cobbler Factory. Gourmet cobbler? Factory? Yes, another little known facet of our local dining scene is that apparently Pasadena has been the epicenter of artisanal fruit cobbler production for several decades. Just around the corner from the Academy Theater, the current iteration of the Gourmet Cobbler Factory dates to 2002, when Clifton and Gloria Powell brought their recipes for “Southern” fruit cobbler to replace those at the original cobbler operation, which had been producing cobbler in the same location since 1978.
Need an idea for take out on Juneteenth or for Father’s Day?

I just went for BBQ and cobbler on Wednesday night and can confirm this place is pretty solid. I wish I had gotten twice the amount of cobbler, but I guess I can go again soon. Like all good BBQ joints, one should call their order in ahead for best availability of meat. 😉

Read Eat This Newsletter 124: Indigenous by Jeremy Cherfas (buttondown.email)
Hello. Bit of a mixed bag this time, so let’s start with possibly the most useful news of the past two weeks: New test could guarantee the perfect avocado. No...
Jeremy always has the best of food coverage out there from compiling the best he finds to making one of the best podcasts around. If you’re not subscribed to his podcast, website(s), or newsletter you’re just doing it wrong.

the Wholesome Meat Act (I kid you not) of 1967 creates three parallel meat streams depending on the inspection in place at the slaughterhouse. Giant meat packers, who have full USDA inspection, can sell their products (and any ancillary pathogens) anywhere in the country. Smaller state-inspected facilities can sell only within their home state. And the smallest slaughterhouses can sell only to people who bought a share in the animal while it was still alive. Meat inspection is a cracking example of the capture of regulatory authority by the largest players, and it is by no means unique to the US. And according the The Counter, the bigger processing plants are getting more favourable treatment even during the Covid-19 emergency. 

Annotated on May 19, 2020 at 09:49AM

No doubt many have already seen that Springer has released about 500 books for free during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Springer, these textbooks will be available free of charge until at least the end of July.

A bit of Googling will reveal people who’ve already written some code to quickly download them all in bulk as well. I’m happy with doing things manually as there’s only a handful of the 8GB of textbooks I’m interested in.

Browsing through, I’ll note a few that look interesting and which foodies like my friend Jeremy Cherfas may enjoy. (Though I suspect he’s likely read them already, but just in case…)

While physical distancing, instead of my daily commute, and like many others, I’ve been spending the time to make bread. I’ve come up with some great loaves so far. I’m contemplating doing some matzo today.

For those who are new to the bread world, I highly recommend you listen to Jeremy Cherfas’ excellent podcast series on Bread from 2018. It’s 31 episodes of about five minutes a piece, which makes it a pleasant way to time your kneading process. You’ll learn a lot more about bread while you’re making it!

Bookmarked Old Fashioned by Tom MacWrightTom MacWright (oldfashioned.tech)

This is a website that I made about cocktails. I'm not a huge cocktail nerd (drinking is bad, probably), but think that they're cool. And the world's pretty bad right now and making this has been calming.

It gave me a chance to both tinker with technology I usually don't use (Elm), and explore some of the cool properties of cocktails: notably that they're pretty similar and have standardized ingredients, so they can be described in relationship to each other.

So some of it might seem funky. By default, the list is sorted by 'feasibility': as you add ingredients that you have, it'll put recipes that you can make (or barely make) closer to the top. Also, click on 'Grid' for a wacky adjacency grid of cocktails and their ingredients.

Also, for vim fans, there’s j & k support.

IndieWeb for trying times!

hat tip:

Read How Much Can Dietary Changes and Food Production Practices Help Mitigate Climate Change? (Pacific Standard)
Food policy experts weigh in on the possibilities of individual diet choices and sustainable production methods.

Agriculture, forestry, and other types of land use account for 23 percent of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, according to the IPCC. 

Annotated on March 07, 2020 at 11:49AM


While there is limited data available that can confidently measure the expansion of the meatless population, societal indicators like the double-digit sales growth of plant-based food options between 2014 and 2017 reflect a growing consumer demand for vegan and vegetarian foods. Still, an analysis by Animal Charity Evaluators found that between 2 and 6 percent of Americans self-identify as vegetarians, and only 1 percent of Americans self-identify as vegetarians and report never consuming meat. 

Annotated on March 07, 2020 at 11:53AM


“The fundamental problem with climate change is that it’s a collective problem, but it rises out of lots of individual decisions. Society’s challenge is to figure out how we can influence those decisions in a way that generates a more positive collective outcome,” says Keith Wiebe, senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute. 

Annotated on March 07, 2020 at 11:55AM


Consumer demand is one of four important variables that, when combined, can influence and shape farming practices, according to Festa. The other three are the culture of farming communities, governmental policies, and the economic system that drives farming. 

Annotated on March 07, 2020 at 11:57AM


Festa argues that this is why organic farming in the U.S. saw a 56 percent increase between 2011 and 2016. 

A useful statistic but it needs more context. What is the percentage of organic farming to the overall total of farming?

Fortunately the linked article provides some additional data: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/01/10/organic-farming-is-on-the-rise-in-the-u-s/
Annotated on March 07, 2020 at 12:01PM

Read Forks used to be instruments of oppression (1843)
Forks can speed up eating. Historically, however, Ann Wroe says their role has been to slow things down.
This is an incredibly flowery piece without any of the substance I was hoping for.


plangent 

Annotated on March 09, 2020 at 10:59PM