👓 Recap of An Introduction to Microformats | gRegorLove.com

Read Recap of An Introduction to Microformats by gRegor MorrillgRegor Morrill (gregorlove.com)
I gave a talk on microformats Wednesday night at the San Diego PHP Meetup group. This was my first time giving a formal talk on the topic. I think it went pretty well and I got some good feedback. There was a lot of information and links covered (and some I forgot) so I decided to make a summary pos...

Wish I could have attended the presentation, but thanks for the recap and links to the resources.

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👓 IndieWeb and the Log Lolla theme | More Themes Baby

Replied to IndieWeb and the Log Lolla theme (More Themes Baby)
Lately I found myself posting a lot about IndieWeb, and thinking about how useful it could be for the next versions of the Log Lolla theme.

I ran across this article today as the result of a refback of all things (hooray for old web infrastructure!). The site had reposted a few IndieWeb related articles I wrote in the past year.

Since they don’t support webmention and don’t seem to have comments on their site open, I’ll say “Hello!” by syndicating to Twitter. I hope you haven’t given up on the idea of what the IndieWeb stands for and are still thinking of making your Log Lolla theme directly compatible with how the IndieWeb works with WordPress. There are a bunch of us out here who’d love to give you any help and support you need as we’d all love to see more IndieWeb friendly themes in the WordPress repo. Feel free to join us in the #IndieWeb chat or the #WordPress chat to say hello.

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👓 Mapping Microformats To This Site | Interdependent Thoughts

Read Mapping Microformats To This Site by Ton ZijlstraTon Zijlstra (zylstra.org)

As a first step to better understand the different layers of adding microformats to my site (what is currently done by the theme, what by plugins etc.), I decided to start with: what is supposed to go where?

I made a post-it map on my wall to create an overview for myself. The map corresponds to the front page of my blog.

Green is content, pink is h- elements, blue u- elements, and yellow p- elements, with the little square ones covering dt- and rel’s. All this is based on the information provided on the http://microformats.org/wiki/Main_Page, and not on what my site actually does. So next step is a comparison of what I expect to be there from this map, to what is actually there. This map is also a useful step to see how to add microformats to the u-design theme for myself.

This is an interesting visual exercise.

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Reply to Ton Zijlstra about microformats in WordPress

Replied to Better Blending of Micro Formats with WordPress Themes by Ton Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
Earlier this week I discussed microformats with Elmine. Microformats make your website machine readable, allowing other computers and applications to e.g. find out where my contact information is, and the metadata from my postings. It was a discussion that branched off a conversation on online repre...

Ton, one of the best “crash courses” I’ve seen for working toward adding microformats to a pre-existing WordPress theme is David Shanske’s GitHub repo forking of the WordPress TwentySixteen Theme. If you follow the list of commits in chronological order from the oldest, you’ll get a good idea of what could and should be done and even how to do it.

Naturally, keep in mind that some themes may also have a few already implemented while others may have them implemented poorly (and sometimes even wrong).

👓 Better Blending of Micro Formats with WordPress Themes | Interdependent Thoughts

Read Better Blending of Micro Formats with WordPress Themes by Ton Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
Earlier this week I discussed microformats with Elmine. Microformats make your website machine readable, allowing other computers and applications to e.g. find out where my contact information is, and the metadata from my postings. It was a discussion that branched off a conversation on online repre...
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📅 RSVP An Introduction to Microformats: November 7, 2018

RSVPed Unable to Attend An Introduction to Microformats: November 7, 2018
PayLease – San Diego, CA
I'll be giving a talk about microformats at the SDPHP meetup group. Learn about microformats(.org), a simple way to markup structural information in your HTML. I will walk through how to publish microformats, how they are parsed, and some compelling use-cases for both publishers and consumers. For more information and RSVP, visit the meetup.com event page.
Add to calendar

I wish I could attend this talk by gRegor this week. If you’re a web developer or designer in the San Diego area, I highly recommend you attend as there aren’t many people who could speak on this important topic as well as he can.

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👓 I’ve just spent the day at IndieWeb Camp Berlin and it has been SUPER fun. | Charlie Owen

Read a post by Charlie OwenCharlie Owen (sonniesedge.co.uk)
I've just spent the day at IndieWeb Camp Berlin and it has been SUPER fun.
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Some ideas about tags, categories, and metadata for online commonplace books and search

Earlier this morning I was reading The Difference Between Good and Bad Tags and the discussion of topics versus objects got me thinking about semantics on my website in general.

People often ask why WordPress has both a Category and a Tag functionality, and to some extent it would seem to be just for this thing–differentiating between topics and objects–or at least it’s how I have used it and perceived others doing so as well. (Incidentally from a functionality perspective categories in the WordPress taxonomy also have a hierarchy while tags do not.) I find that I don’t always do a great job at differentiating between them nor do I do so cleanly every time. Typically it’s more apparent when I go searching for something and have a difficult time in finding it as a result. Usually the problem is getting back too many results instead of a smaller desired subset. In some sense I also look at categories as things which might be more interesting for others to subscribe to or follow via RSS from my site, though I also have RSS feeds for tags as well as for post types/kinds as well.

I also find that I have a subtle differentiation using singular versus plural tags which I think I’m generally using to differentiate between the idea of “mine” versus “others”. Thus the (singular) tag for “commonplace book” should be a reference to my particular commonplace book versus the (plural) tag “commonplace books” which I use to reference either the generic idea or the specific commonplace books of others. Sadly I don’t think I apply this “rule” consistently either, but hope to do so in the future.

I’ve also been playing around with some more technical tags like math.NT (standing for number theory), following the lead of arXiv.org. While I would generally have used a tag “number theory”, I’ve been toying around with the idea of using the math.XX format for more technical related research on my site and the more human readable “number theory” for the more generic popular press related material. I still have some more playing around with the idea to see what shakes out. I’ve noticed in passing that Terence Tao uses these same designations on his site, but he does them at the category level rather than the tag level.

Now that I’m several years into such a system, I should probably spend some time going back and broadening out the topic categories (I arbitrarily attempt to keep the list small–in part for public display/vanity reasons, but it’s relatively easy to limit what shows to the public in my category list view.) Then I ought to do a bit of clean up within the tags themselves which have gotten unwieldy and often have spelling mistakes which cause searches to potentially fail. I also find that some of my auto-tagging processes by importing tags from the original sources’ pages could be cleaned up as well, though those are generally stored in a different location on my website, so it’s not as big a deal to me.

Naturally I find myself also thinking about the ontogeny/phylogeny problems of how I do these things versus how others at large do them as well, so feel free to chime in with your ideas, especially if you take tags/categories for your commonplace book/website seriously. I’d like to ultimately circle back around on this with regard to the more generic tagging done from a web-standards perspective within the IndieWeb and Microformats communities. I notice almost immediately that the “tag” and “category” pages on the IndieWeb wiki redirect to the same page yet there are various microformats including u-tag-of and u-category which are related but have slightly different meanings on first blush. (There is in fact an example on the IndieWeb “tag” page which includes both of these classes neither of which seems to be counter-documented at the Microformats site.) I should also dig around to see what Kevin Marks or the crew at Technorati must surely have written a decade or more ago on the topic.


cc: Greg McVerry, Aaron Davis, Ian O’Byrne, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Jeremy Cherfas

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👓 Introducing Trashy.css | CSS Tricks

Read Introducing Trashy.css by Nathan Smith (CSS-Tricks)
It began, as many things do, with a silly conversation. In this case, I was talking with our Front End Technology Competency Director (aka "boss man")

I can’t wait to try this out on some sites. I love that it’s got a browser bookmarklet that will let one test out other sites too.

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Reply to Curtis McHale and David Wolfpaw on rel-alternate

Replied to a tweet by DΛVID V3.0.6DΛVID V3.0.6 (Twitter)

The conversation started in the IndieWeb Chat last week with:
15:27 aaronpk: “my post permalinks now have a rel=alternate link to an mf2 and jf2 JSON version of the post”

And continued over the next several hours and days primarily with participation of aaronpk, GWG, and pfefferle among a few others.

David Shanske (GWG) and I discussed an overview of it in the most recent episode of An IndieWeb Podcast. The conversation about rel=”alternate” begins at the 11:00 minute mark.

Somewhere there’s a note that GWG has already built a big chunk of code into the Webmention/Semantic Linkbacks plugin that implements a large chunk of the work already. There’s also some work done in https://github.com/indieweb/wordpress-mf2-feed as well.

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🔖 ❤️ vilhalmer tweet

Liked a tweet by vil vil (Twitter)
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An Indieweb Podcast: Episode 9 30 Days of Indieweb

Episode 9: 30 Days of Indieweb


Running time: 0h 58m 33s | Download (18.9MB) | Subscribe by RSS | Huffduff

Summary: David is about to head off abroad for a month. We talk about what’s been happening recently and his plans for his upcoming sojourn.

Recorded: August 5, 2018

Shownotes

IndieWeb Camp NYC–September 28-29, 2018–RSVPs are open now

Micropub Plugin work for WordPress
It will include a Media endpoint
Code for integration with the WordPress REST API

rel=”alternate”
This sketch solution may be an end-around the issue of getting WordPress (or potentially other CMSes) Themes to be microformats 2 compatible, and allow a larger range of inter-compatibility for websites and communication.

Facebook API changes cause breakage of Brid.gy
Ditchbook, a micropub-based tool for exporting data from Facebook and importing into other services

Greg McVerry’s EDU522 course Digital Teaching and Learning Too (🎧 00:47:57)

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👓 Classical music metadata | Imani Mosley

Replied to Classical music metadata by Imani Mosley (Imani Mosley)

This metadata project came about in a very practical fashion: NPR's in-house music database has a legacy file naming convention for its art music back from when it was digitizing LPs and moving from a physical collection to an online one. I won't go too much into why the system exists as it does but what's important to know is that it is as anachronistic as possible. There is very little connection between it and any other "standard" and makes it nearly impossible to discover anything as the search is exact rather than flexible. So being good librarians, we want to fix it. Making that statement was the easy part.

What followed was a very intense meeting in which my supervisor and I went through the pros and cons of various metadata & cataloging systems (our in-house database, iTunes, and others). There were far more cons than pros. It gave us a lot to consider and some things we could put in place but still left an uneasy feeling.

Imani, I didn’t see a comment box on your website and it doesn’t appear to support the Webmention spec yet, so I’ll post my reply on my site (something I’d do anyway) and send you a ping via Twitter.

I can’t help but thinking that this may be a potential use case for microformats. I notice there’s already some useful pages and research on music and even sheet music on their website.

If nothing else, I’d recommend that you or others delving into the process of looking at music metadata try to emulate the process behind what microformats are and how they work. I think it’s highly useful to take an overview of what and how people are already doing things in real life situations, figure out common patterns, and then documenting them to make the overall scope of work potentially smaller as well as to indicate a best path forward. Many companies will have created proprietary formats and methods which are likely to be highly incompatible or described, but not actually implemented in actual practice. (Hint: avoid unimplemented suggestions at all costs.) Your small polling sample already indicates a lot of variability, and I suspect your poll is very biased give people who would most likely be following your account.

A good starting point for answering your problem might be to do a bit of reading on microformats and then asking questions in the microformat community’s online chat. I suspect there are several people in the community who have done large-scale work on the web and categorization who might be able to help you out as well as point you in the direction of prior art and others who are working on these problems.

If you need help in understanding some of the microformats material, I’m happy to help you out via phone or online video chat and introduce you to some folks in the area.

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