👓 Implementing IndieWeb on your personal Drupal site, part 1 | Roy Scholten

Read Implementing IndieWeb on your personal Drupal site, part 1 by Roy Scholten (yoroy.com)
This is my version of the steps you need to take to make your site part of the indie web community. Swentel helped me getting it all setup on this here Drupal site using his indieweb module. It’s all a bit complicated still, so this is mostly me trying to retroactively understand what’s going on...

It’s great to see people using swentel‘s Drupal plugin to better own, control, and use their presence online to better communicate with others! I may have to spin up an instance and check it out soon myself.
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Reply to Your Challenge: Take Back The Open Web

Replied to Your Challenge: Take Back The Open Web by Daniel Bachhuber (WordCamp for Publishers: Chicago)

This year, we’re asking for speaker applications that focus on Taking Back The Open Web. But what does this really mean?

One thought is that the Open Web is inclusive and encourages fair distribution of ideas with no barrier to entry. It exists in opposition to proprietary systems created by companies for the purposes of lock-in, control of user experience, or requiring payment for entry. In 2010, the New York Times pointed out ways in which these platforms trade fair access to ideas for a better-looking web.

It’s 2018 now, and we’ve seen the impact of opaque, tightly-controlled systems. In  “Can We Save the Open Web”, Drupal founder Dries Buytaert asks:

Do we want the experiences of the next billion web users to be defined by open values of transparency and choice, or by the siloed and opaque convenience of the walled-garden giants dominating today?

After helping to implement and post the first “Read posts” within WordPress using the W3C Webmention spec yesterday, I really can’t wait to see what the WordCamp for Publishers: Chicago begins announcing for their upcoming lineup on the topic “Take Back the Open Web.”

Most promising to me is that this WordCamp actively, purposely, and contemporaneously quoted Drupal founder Dries Buytaert in their announcement right after he began contemplating POSSE vs. PESOS and other IndieWeb philosophies.

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👓 The Royal Family using Drupal | Dries Buytaert

Read The Royal Family using Drupal by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (dri.es)
An average of 12 million people check the Royal Family website each year

I remember thinking about the signals that were pushed out when WhiteHouse.gov went from Drupal to WordPress, but honestly in the broader scheme of things, I’m really surprised that the Trump administration didn’t slip all the way down to using Wix.com.

In any case, it’s always interesting to see which organizations are using which platforms.

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👓 When should we release Drupal 9? | Dries Buytaert

Read When should we release Drupal 9? by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (dri.es)
Thoughts about Drupal 9 release timelines, including how this might impact Drupal 7, Drupal 8 and even Drupal 10.

Interesting to watch the hows and whys of the ways open source projects plan their releases. I wish that WordPress had more outward communication like this for big releases and projects like Gutenberg. Transparent and open communication can sure help a lot of potential problems.

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🔖 IndieWeb Module for Drupal

Bookmarked IndieWeb Module for Drupal by Kristof De Jaeger (Drupal.org)
Integrates the philosophy of Indieweb in your Drupal website.
For more information about indieweb, see https://indieweb.org/.

Current functionality:
  • Receive webmentions and pingbacks via Webmention.io
  • Publish content etc via bridg.y, store syndications
  • Microformats for content and images
  • IndieAuth and Authentication API
  • Micropub for creating content etc
  • Creating comments from 'in-reply-to'
  • Microsub link exposing
This is only the tip of the iceberg and much more functionality will be added.
More extensive documentation is in the README file and on the configuration screens.

To install
  • composer require indieweb/mention-client in the root of your Drupal installation.
  • go to admin/modules and toggle 'Indieweb' to enable the module.
  • go to admin/config/services/indieweb and start configuring.
Currently development is happening on Github at https://github.com/swentel/indieweb and is synced back for bug fixes and releases. Create issues on Github.

This looks like a tremendous step forward for folks who want to join the IndieWeb via Drupal. Kudos to Kristof De Jaeger for some fantastic looking work.​​​​​​​​

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Reply to ravisagar on Twitter

Replied to ravisagar on Twitter (Twitter)
@ChrisAldrich Just found your blog after searching more about implementing #POSSE and #Webmention Great content. Thanks for sharing.

If you’re building in Drupal, I’m sure you’ll also find some valuable help from @hongpong, @mlncn@dries, and @swentel.

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👓 Three ways we can improve Drupal’s evaluator experience | Dries Buytaert

Read Three ways we can improve Drupal's evaluator experience by Dries Buytaert (dri.es)
It’s time to improve Drupal's download process and end-user documentation. I believe we can improve Drupal's evaluator experience with these three steps.
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👓 Posting my phone’s battery status to my site | Dries Buytaert

Read Posting my phone's battery status to my site by Dries Buytaert (dri.es)
Working towards being able to publish notes and photos from my phone

This functionality seemed eerily familiar to me as I began to read, but the really interesting part is the reason he did it.

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👓 Webmention.io integration for Drupal 8 | realize.be

Read Webmention.io integration for Drupal 8 by Kristof De Jaeger (realize.be)
I've had my site for quite some time now, the internet archive goes way back to 2002 even! To be fair, most of the content until 2007 wasn't that interesting (not sure what makes me think it is nowadays though, but okay ... ), but it was mostly the primary source of well .. me :). Apart from that, I also use Twitter, but I want to turn this around and let my site be the primary source. The IndieWeb movement is something I only recently discovered, but somehow, the philosophy was in my mind for the last few weeks, and I am not the only one that is talking about it. So, as a first small step, to figure out who links to my content, I created a simple Drupal 8 module that can receive and store webmentions and pingbacks from Webmention.io. The source is available at https://github.com/swentel/webmention_io. I'll move this drupal.org at some point once it gets into a more polished state, but it also depends on further iterations of getting more interaction feedback to my site. Next up is looking at https://brid.gy/ as the service has integration with social networks to post and retrieve replies from there.

This isn’t as direct a solution as I would have expected, but I suspect that it probably works pretty well. While reading it, I feel obliged more than usual to make a read post and send a webmention to it…

It’s interesting to see some of the great strides forward Drupal has been making in the IndieWeb arena since November .

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👓 My POSSE plan for evolving my site | Dries Buytaert

Read My POSSE plan for evolving my site by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (dri.es)
How I plan to evolve my site to take back control over my data and reclaim my blog as my thought space.

An excellent layout of itches for improving a website.

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Dries Buytaert: creator of Drupal and co-founder of Acquia

Followed Dries Buytaert, creator of Drupal and co-founder of Acquia by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (dri.es)
Discover Dries' thoughts on the open web, the future of digital, technology startups, Open Source and Drupal.

Dries looks like he’s not only starting to post more, but post more interesting pieces about the future of the web.

Reply to “To PESOS or to POSSE?” by Dries Buytaert

Replied to To PESOS or to POSSE? by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (dri.es)
Comparing two different approaches that help you take control back over your own data on the web. [...] The goal of this analysis was to understand the pros and cons of how I can own my own content on https://dri.es. While PESOS would be much easier to implement, I decided to go with POSSE. My next step is to figure out my "POSSE plan"; how to quickly and easily share status updates on my Drupal site, how to syndicate them to 3rd party services, how to re-organize my mailing list and my RSS feed, and more. If you have any experience with implementing POSSE, feel free to share your takeaways in the comments.

What a fantastic breakdown of the concepts of POSSE vs. PESOS, though to be sure there are also additional variations for syndicating, cross-posting, or moving content around to reach various audiences.

One thing that I think you’ve only briefly touched upon is the ability to also have likes, replies/comments, etc. also come back to your site as native content via webmentions. I’ve been able to get rid of five apps and their incessant notifications and trim it all back to just using my own site to handle everything instead. Using something I choose to use instead of something I’m forced to, while also owning my data, is really very liberating.

Like you, I too have always wanted to own my own content on the web, and there are some easier and some harder methods. Not being as strong a developer as many, I’ve taken a more hybrid approach to things which is still evolving. To some extent I began at the easy end with some PESOS based workflows and relying on simple tools like IFTTT.com to at least begin owning all my content. For many content management systems, this is nearly dead easy, and could even be done with something as simple and flexible as Tumblr without much, if any, coding experience.

Over time, as I’ve been able, I’ve  moved to a more direct POSSE method as either I or, more often, others have managed to master making the simple posting interfaces easier and easier. I think in the end, POSSE is the strongest of the methods, so that has always been my ultimate goal.

From a Drupal-centric approach, you might be able to gain an interesting perspective on the multitude of ways POSSE/PESOS can be done by looking at the various ways that are available in WordPress ecosystem. It’s probably easy to discern that some are far easier than others based on one’s facility with coding. In general, I’ve noticed that the more freedom and flexibility a particular method or plugin has, the longer it takes to code and/or configure. The less flexibility a plugin offers, the easier. (So one could compare something like SNAP at the more comprehensive/difficult end to something simpler like JetPack for POSSE.) The difficulty is in the administrative tax of keeping up with the panoply of social media platform APIs to keep things working smoothly over time, particularly when you want your posts to be able to leverage the broad arrays of posting options and display outputs platforms like Facebook and Twitter offer. The other difficult questions can sometimes be: am I just replacing one or two social platforms, or am I trying to replace 20? and am I doing them with one plugin or with 20? and finally, how DRY is that process? Sometimes manually cutting and pasting is just as good.

As you do, I write first and foremost for myself and then a distant second for reaction and conversation with others. Thus I think of my personal site as just that: personal. To some extent it’s a modern day version of a commonplace book where I collect a variety of thoughts in a variety of means, while still trying somewhat to keep it in an outer facing form to look what people might expect a site to look like. This means that I have a good number more than the traditional types of posts most social media sites have. I try to own all my own bookmarks and even post what I’m reading both online and in physical form. I keep highlights and annotations of things I find interesting. I naturally keep longer posts, status updates, and photos like many. I even log scrobbles of music and podcasts I listen to as well as film and television I watch. Interestingly there’s a tremendous amount I only publish privately to myself or a small circle of others that’s hidden on my site’s back end. Depending on how far and deep you want your experience to go you might want to consider how all these will look or be represented on your site. To  a great extent, I think that WordPress’s attempt to copy Tumblr (text, photo, quote, link, chat, audio, video) with their Post Formats was interesting, it just didn’t go far enough. Naturally, this may take a different form for you depending on whether you’re building just for yourself or if you’re planning something more modular for the larger Drupal community to leverage.

Screencapture of my homepage with a list of the various post types my site supports including: articles, notes, bookmarks, jams, checkins, watches, RSVPs, etc.
A few of the post types my website supports.

The best part of all this is that I’ve not done any of it alone. While I try to maintain a list of some of my experiments to help others (you’ll probably appreciate the ones on mobile posting and RSS based on your outline), there’s also a wealth of other examples on the IndieWeb wiki and a terrifically stellar group of people around almost 24-7 in the IndieWeb chat to help spur me along. I’ll echo Tantek’s welcome to what I think is a more thoughtful and vibrant open web.

I hope others also find these resources so they’re not fumbling around in the dark as I was for so long. Since you’re obviously building in Drupal, I can recommend you take a look at some of the examples provided by the WordPress and the Known communities which Ben referenced. Since they’re all .php based and open-source, you may get further faster in addition to being able to iterate upon and improve their work. Many of the developers are frequently in the IndieWeb chat and I’m sure would be happy to help with ideas and pitfalls they came across along the way.

Like others, I’m posting my reply first on my own website, and manually cross-posting it to yours (manually until you support Webmention–perhaps via the Vinculum plugin?) as well as automatically to Twitter and others.

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Alpha Release of Linkback Module for Drupal 8 with Webmention Support [8.x-1.0-alpha1]

Bookmarked Alpha Release of Linkback Module for Drupal 8 with Webmention Support [8.x-1.0-alpha1] by Dan FeidtDan Feidt (Drupal.org)
We are proud to bring you the first alpha release of Linkback, an interesting suite of modules which can help integrate your website with the wider internet. Linkback provides the backend functionality to save both outgoing and incoming pings and webmentions involving remote sites.

Drupal 8, now (along with platforms like WithKnown, Perch, WordPress, Craft, Kirby, ProcessWire, Elgg, and Django) has Webmention support. Congratulations to Dan Feidt (aka HongPong) and everyone involved!

This means that more websites can communicate directly with each other on the open and decentralized web. (Wouldn’t you like to “@mention” someone from your own website to theirs?) It’s a rapidly growing reality on the internet.​​​​​

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