Reply to Blog Engines and Indieweb Controlling Upstream by Brad Enslen

Replied to Blog Engines and Indieweb Controlling Upstream by Brad EnslenBrad Enslen (Brad Enslen)
All this WordPress 5.0 Gutenberg stuff got me thinking.  With WordPress it seems like the Indieweb starts making serious and cool progress and the WordPress people come along and knock the game board and pieces off the table.  And it sounds like the disruption from WordPress is going to continue f...

Brad, I like and agree with your general thoughts, but I think that looking at the long term broader picture, most of what you’re describing is covered under the umbrella principle of plurality. For things to grow and thrive, we all need plurality to flourish. As a result there are several hundred projects within the broader IndieWeb which are growing and thriving. It seems far slower because a large number of the projects are single-maintainer single-user ones which are being built for personal use.

It’s nice that there are mass-scale projects like WordPress, WithKnown, Get Perch, Grav, Drupal, and a few others which have one or more “IndieWeb-centric” developers working on them that allow those without the coding skills to jump in and enjoy the additional freedom and functionality. The occasional drawback is that those big-hearted developers also fit into the broader fabric of those massively distributed projects and sometimes their voices aren’t as well heard, if at all.

I’m aware of the disruption of the Gutenberg Editor within WordPress v5.0 and how it applies to those using IndieWeb technology on WordPress. I’m sure it will eventually get sorted out in a reasonable fashion. Sadly, throwing out the baby out with the bathwater as it comes to WordPress and IndieWeb may not be the best solution for many people and may actually be a painful detriment to several hundreds.

While it would be interesting to see a larger group of developers converge on building an open and broadly used IndieWeb system as you suggest, it takes a massive amount of work and community collaboration to get such a thing moving. I think this bears out if you look at the lay of the land as it already exists. Just think of the time effort and energy that the core IndieWeb community puts into the tremendous amount of resources that exist today.

Looking back on the past 4+ years of IndieWeb within the WordPress community, I’m really amazed to see exactly how far things have come and where things currently stand. There used to be a dozen or more pieces that required custom code, duct tape, and baling wire to get things working. Now it’s a handful of relatively stable and well set up pieces that—particularly for me—really makes WordPress deliver as an open source content management system and next generation social medial platform that aims to democratize publishing. In terms of building for the future, I suspect that helping to bring new people into the fold (users, developers, designers, etc.) will increase and improve the experience overall. To some degree, I feel like we’re just getting started on what is possible and recruiting new users and help will be the best thing for improving things moving forward. IndieWeb integration into large-scale projects like WordPress, Drupal, etc. are very likely to be the place that these ideas are likely to gain a foothold in the mainstream and change the tide of how the internet works.

While it may seem daunting at times, in addition to the heroic (part-time, it needs to be noted) developers like Mathias Pfefferle, David Shanske, Micah Cambre, Michael Bishop, Ashton McAllan, Jack Jamieson,  Ryan Barrett, Peter MolnarAmanda Rush; enthusiastic supporters like you, Greg McVerry, Aaron Davis, Manton Reece; and literally hundreds of others (apologies to those I’ve missed by name) who are using and living with these tools on a daily basis, there are also quieter allies like Brandon Kraft, Ryan Boren, Jeremy Herve and even Matt himself, even if he’s not directly aware of it, who are contributing in their own ways as well. Given the immense value of what IndieWeb brings to the web, I can’t imagine that they won’t ultimately win out.

If it helps, some of the current IndieWeb issues pale in comparison to some of the accessibility problems that Gutenberg has neglected within the WordPress community. Fortunately those a11ys are sticking with the greater fight to make things better not only for themselves, but for the broader community and the world. I suggest that, like them, we all suit up and continue the good fight.

Of course part of the genius of how IndieWeb is structured: anyone is free to start writing code, make better UI, and create something of their own. Even then they benefit from a huge amount of shared work, resources, and simple standards that are already out there.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Send me a webmention with Drupal! | Swentel

Read Send me a webmention with Drupal! by Kristof De JaegerKristof De Jaeger (realize.be)

After months of reading, experimenting and a lot of coding, I'm happy that the first release candidate of the Drupal IndieWeb module is out. I guess this makes the perfect time to try it out for yourself, no? There are a lot of concepts within the IndieWeb universe, and many are supported by the module. In fact, there are 8 submodules, so it might be daunting to start figuring out which ones to enable and what they exactly allow you to do. To kick start anyone interested, I'll publish a couple of articles detailing how to set up several concepts using the Drupal module. The first one will explain in a few steps how you can send a webmention to this page. Can you mention me?

A red letter day in that there’s another open source Webmention set up for a huge CMS!

Syndicated copies to:

Reply to Dries Buytaert on follow and subscriptions to blogs

Replied to a tweet by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (Twitter)

Happy birthday Dries! If I may, can I outline a potential web-based birthday present based on your  wish?

Follow posts

With relation to your desire to know who’s subscribed and potentially reading your posts, I think there are a number of ways forward, and even better, ways that are within easy immediate reach using Drupal as well as many other CMSes using some simple web standards.

I suspect you’ve been following Kristof De Jaeger’s work with the Drupal IndieWeb module which is now a release candidate. It will allow you to send and receive Webmentions (a W3C recommendation) which are simple notifications much the way they work on Twitter, Facebook, etc. I’ve written a bit about how they could be leveraged to accomplish several things in Webmentions: Enabling Better Communication on the Internet.

Not mentioned in that article for brevity is the ability to send notifications via Webmention when one makes follow or subscription posts.

As an example, I’ve created a follow post for you for which my site would have sent a Webmention. Unfortunately at the time, your site didn’t support receiving it, so you would have missed out on it unless you support older legacy specs like pingback, trackback, or refback.

I also created a larger related Following page of people and sites I’m subscribed to which also lists you, so you would have received another notification from it if you supported Webmention.

I’m unaware of anyone actually displaying these notifications on their website (yet!), though I’ve got some infrastructure on my own site to create a “Followed by” page which will store and show these follows or subscriptions. At present, they’re simply stored in my back end.

Read Posts

As for Rachel’s request, this too is also possible with “read” webmentions. I maintain a specific linkblog feed (RSS) with all of the online material I read. All of those posts send notifications to the linked sites. While it’s not widely supported by other platforms yet, there are a few which do, so that online publications can better delineate and display the difference between likes, bookmarks, reads, etc. There’s at least one online newspaper among 800+WordPress websites which support this functionality. I suspect that with swentel’s Drupal module and some code for supporting the proper microformats, this is a quick reality in the Drupal space as well. Because the functionality is built on basic web standards, it’s possible for any CMS to support them. All that’s left is to ramp up adoption.

A quick note on Microsub and feed readers

Dave Winer in his reply to you linked to a post about showing likes on his site (presumably using the Twitter API) where he laments:

I know the Like icon doesn’t show up in your feed reader (maybe that can change)

Interestingly, swentel’s module also supports Microsub, so that reader clients will allow one to like (bookmark, or reply to) posts directly within readers which will then send Micropub requests to one’s website to post them as well as to potentially send Webmention notifications. These pieces help to close the circle of posting, reading, and easily interacting on the open web the way closed silos like Facebook, Twitter, et al. allow.

Syndicated copies to:

❤️ the first Drupal to Drupal conversation over webmention

Liked a post by swentelswentel (realize.be)
Milestone: the first Drupal to Drupal conversation over webmention (AFAIK)! Thanks @aleksip for testing :) https://www.aleksip.net/trying-out-the-indieweb-module #indieweb #drupal

Awesome news indeed!

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Gary Pendergast Praises ClassicPress, Extends Invitation for Collaboration | WordPress Tavern

Read Gary Pendergast Praises ClassicPress, Extends Invitation for Collaboration (WordPress Tavern)
Gutenberg and WordPress core contributor Gary Pendergast has weighed in with this thoughts on ClassicPress, a fork of WordPress created by Scott Bowler. Pendergast praises the fork and extended an …

The potential forking of WordPress like this actually could present an interesting opportunity for the broader community and the platform. It reminds me a bit of the BackDrop fork of Drupal and how it has benefited both platforms going forward. BackDrop has about 100 solid contributors that are building and iterating much more rapidly on their platform than the bigger behemoth of Drupal. As a result, new plugins and cleaner UI have entered their core and improved more rapidly with active dogfooding while their security teams collaborate closely and pushes go back and forth between the two. In the end both platforms end up benefiting tremendously. Naturally the two need to have some collegiality and collaboration to help make sure this happens.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 First Look at Live Demo of the Gutenberg Content Editor for Drupal 8 | WP Tavern

Read First Look at Live Demo of the Gutenberg Content Editor for Drupal 8 (WordPress Tavern)
Drupal Europe has just announced its program for the upcoming event in Darmstadt, Germany, September 10-14. The conference will host more than 1,600 Drupal professionals and enthusiasts for 162 hou…

This seems only natural. I do wish both sides would take a stronger look at Micropub though as it’s already built to work with any CMS that would like to use it.

Syndicated copies to:
Checked into Eureka! Dinner

Drupal after dark.
Cocktails and dinner with John Romine, Jen Lampton, Martin Beck, Rebeca Godin, Shawn DeArmond, and the rest of the gang.

Drank: Eureka! Punch: Bourbon / spiced rum / white rum / herbsaint / brandy / bitters / clove / corriander / cinnamon / green tea / clarified milk / pineapple / lemon
Drank: The Penicillin: smoked whiskey / ginger / honey / citrus
Ate: Cobb Salad with chicken / blue cheese / egg / avocado / bacon / tomato / red onion / ranch

Syndicated copies to:

❤️ Dries tweet

Liked a tweet by Dries BuytaertDries Buytaert (Twitter)

What a gift! Dries @s me while I’m at DrupalCamp! I feel like I’ve got some serious Drupal street cred now.

Syndicated copies to:

Reply to zeldman about ALA article on webmention

Replied to a tweet by Jeffrey ZeldmanJeffrey Zeldman (Twitter)

As I prep for DrupalCamp LA this weekend I’m considering how fun and impressive it’s been watching folks like Kristof De Jaeger (t) & Dries Buytaert (t) bring Webmention and other #IndieWeb philosophies to Drupal since February.
https://www.drupal.org/project/indieweb

Additional details and documentation can be found on the Drupal page of the IndieWeb wiki.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Controlling How Webmentions are Rendered | ruk.ca

Read Controlling How Webmentions are Rendered by Peter RukavinaPeter Rukavina (ruk.ca)
Ton continues to wrap his head around Webmention, and wonders about how mentions should be displayed on the “mentioned” site: What strikes me as odd now is how little control I have over how the Webmention and Semantic Linkbacks plugins actually deal with webmention data. The stuff I’d like to...
Syndicated copies to: