Wish I had been able to attend the WithKnown Collective meeting this morning. Somehow between the conversation in the chat room last week, the meeting time chooser, and the posting in events.indieweb.org, nothing sent me a notification to know when the actual meeting was finally set. Total user interface fail on so many levels. Hopefully there are some good notes for catching up.
Read To the Un-Known! by Evgeny KuznetsovEvgeny Kuznetsov (DIMV)
Visitors of this blog might have noticed I’ve moved it from Known to Hugo recently. Doing it without losing IndieWeb features was quite a hassle, I admit, so I felt the need to document the process. Hopefully, my experience will be of use to someone, and even if not, bragging is half of the fun ab...
Those who are paying attention at will see the value in webmention for allowing cross-site interactions without the need for “social media”. WithKnown, Drupal, Grav, and other CMSes are capable of doing this too.

(Ownership of your Open Pedagogy Anyone? Who needs invasive corporate social media to interact online now?)

Replied to a post by Jeannie McGeehanJeannie McGeehan (Modern Retro Me)
For the longest time I had felt that WordPress was just way too robust and clunky for my wants/need/desires for blogging. Other solutions were either not mobile-friendly or not as cost-effective as my hosting account. Finally decided to give @withknown a try. Took a bit to get it all set up, but once I did it seems to have what I really need. I wanted something that was between Blogger and Twitter but that also incorporated Indieweb technologies like webmentions. Something I could post my recipes and long-form posts but could also easily post quick micro-posts on-the-go should the mood strike me. Known combined with the Indigenous mobile app gives me all of that and more. Really looking forward to posting more.
Congratulations on the move. Looking good so far!
Read About Known by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)
In 2013, my mother had a double lung transplant. The rules for recovery post-transplantation are that you can't have a bridge between you and the hospital; they don't want you to be stuck in traffic if you need emergency attention. So we rented an apartment in the Inner Sunset, where we all sat with...
Read Upgrade Time! by John EvdemonJohn Evdemon (Loosely Coupled Thinking)
I love Known - it's an elegant blogging tool that supports most Indieweb standards right out of the box. The biggest challenge I've had with Known is getting it upgraded.  I host my blog with Reclaim - a great little hosting service with excellent customer support. 
Some useful advice for updating Known when I get around to it. I feel like the technical hurdle for maintaining it has increased with the addition of needing bits like Composer.
Replied to Agenda for Nov. 22nd Meeting by Todd ConawayTodd Conaway (Teaching and Learning on the Open Web)

We should make some agreements about our focus.

  • Are we continuting with various tools and sharing them on this site?
  • Should we focus more on building out our own domains and share that process?
  • Both? Other? 
  • Where shall we go?
Todd, I’ve randomly come across this post today and thought I’d toss out some additional ideas to consider if you haven’t already made up your minds.

If you’re thinking about doing something like WithKnown (aka Known, the CMS your post is on), and interested in the WordPress portion, you might consider doing a full/partial Domain of One’s Own program through Reclaim Hosting or even rolling your own. Even if you go small with just a few classes, you might consider adapting the Homebrew Website Club model at your site where you invite students to tinker around, help each other out, and then show off or demonstrate their work. The related IndieWeb wiki and online chat are free to join and can provide a wealth of information and help for students (and educators!) working at owning their own domains.

Incidentally, if you’re unaware, WordPress now has a suite of plugins that will allow it to have a lot of the site-to-site communication capabilities that Known does. I’ve not done it before, but I’m fairly certain you could run it on a multiuser installation of WordPress much the same way you’re using http://janevangalen.com/cms/.

Another interesting option would be to have students try out accounts on micro.blog which are relatively inexpensive, though I suspect if you touched base with Manton Reece and explained what you were doing, he might offer free or significantly reduced hosting for a reasonable period of time. I know he’s given away a year of free hosting to attendees of IndieWebCamps who are starting out with their own domains. If he did then you might be able to use some institutional funds to purchase domains for students to get them started.

I’m happy to spitball ideas in these areas if you’re interested. I’m glad to see others experimenting around with the ideas around DoOO and IndieWeb for Education!

By the way, good on you for opening up your planning process for teaching and learning on the open web. It certainly sets a useful example for others who are exploring and following in your footsteps.

Watched Connecting to the IndieWeb Movement by Jim GroomJim Groom from bavatuesdays

B4CoUflCUAEMNpG

Tomorrow at 12 PM Eastern/ 9 AM Pacific I’ll be be hosting a Connected Courses discussion that will explore the IndieWeb movement as a people-centered response to the corporate web. How do core IndieWeb principles such as owning your content, remaining better connected, and redefining control online intersect with the values of connected learning? Take a bit of time tomorrow and join myself, Mikhail GershovichBen WerdmullerErin Jo Richey, and Simon Thomson to find out more.

I particularly love how they all underline the humanity that should and does underlie the web. This is certainly a classic for the area of IndieWeb and education. I’m not sure how I hadn’t seen this before.

[Withknown is] the posterchild of the IndieWeb.
— Jim Groom

I’ll agree that it is pretty darn awesome!

Some slight rephrasings from Ben in the video that I thought were spot on:

IndieWeb: allowing people to connect online without caring about what platforms or services they’re using.

IndieWeb puts the learner first. The LMS, which primarily serves an administrative function, should not be the center of the process.

Liked The best way to blog in 2020 by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)
I've been blogging - albeit not consistently on the same site - since 1998. That's a long time in internet years, and in human years, and over time I've conditioned out any self-editing impulse I might have. I write, hit publish, and share. Done. Because I'm fairly prolific, friends and colleagues o...
Amen Ben!
Liked a tweet by Johan BovéJohan Bové (Twitter)
Just wait until your friends start complaining when they realize that the SEO on their names and photos is ruined by your website ranking so far above their own websites and social.
Replied to a post by Johan BovéJohan Bové (Johan's Known)
Interesting experiment Chris. Too bad that the spam-bots found this site so fast. Especially for that reason I'm keeping the public comments on my own instance closed. What are you using for keeping webmentions to your site spam-free?
To my knowledge, there has yet to be an instance of spam within the broader community using Webmention. Of course, if it does become a problem there are community-based plugins like Akismet which have been very effective in the past. Others are also experimenting with building the idea of Vouch to extend Webmention as well.

cc: Chris Aldrich

Replied to a tweet by Katherine MossKatherine Moss (Twitter)
There’s no reason you can’t have multiple websites. Several of us do it for a variety of reasons:
https://indieweb.org/multi-site_indieweb

I’ve been running versions of both for many years and they each have their pros and cons. In terms of IndieWeb support they’re both very solid. Why not try them both for a bit and see which appeals to you more? Depending on your skill level and what you’re looking for in your site you may find one easier to run and maintain than another.

Personally I’ve used WithKnown (I’ve used it for multiple sites since it started) in a more “set it and forget it” mode where I just post content there and worry less about maintenance or tinkering around. On my WordPress site  I tend to do a lot more tinkering and playing around, particularly because there is a much larger number of plugins available to utilize without writing any of my own code. Lately I am kind of itching to play around with Drupal again now that it has a pretty solid looking IndieWeb module (aka plugin).