RSVPed Attending WordPress IndieWeb Online Meetup

Interested in the Indieweb, but you already have a WordPress site? Do you have a WordPress website or thinking of starting one?

Whether you’re a blogger, coder, designer, or just someone who wants to improve their presence on the web, if you have a WordPress site and want to add Indieweb functionality to it, this is the meetup for you.

Expand your reach, improve your connection with your audience. Make it easier to interact with your website. Have better control of your web presence.

With recent events keeping many of us at home, what better time is there to connect your presence on the web to others?

  • 7:00-7:15 - Introductions
  • 7:15-7:45 - overview of Indieweb tools and WordPress
  • 7:45-9:00 - Open Discussion/Chat/Support
RSVPed Attending ONLINE: Homebrew Website Club West Coast
April 1, 2020
Wed 6:00 - 8:00pm (America/Los_Angeles)
 

Join the Zoom call: link to come

We will provide a Zoom video conference link 20 minutes before the meetup here and in the IndieWeb chat.


Homebrew Website Club is a meetup for anyone interested in personal websites and a distributed web. Whether you’re a blogger, coder, designer, or just someone who wants to improve their presence on the web, this meetup is for you.

6:00pm–7:00pm Quiet writing hour

  • Finish that blog post you’ve been working on!

7:00pm–8:00pm IndieWeb Meetup

  • Demos of personal website breakthroughs
  • Discussion around the independent web
  • Create or update your personal web site!

Join a community with like-minded interests. Bring friends that want a personal site, or are interested in a healthy, independent web!

Chat archives

Please read through our Code of Conduct.

FOURTEEN

There’s current research, coding work, and thinking going on within the IndieWeb community to extend ideas like private webmentions and limiting audience so that this sort of interaction can happen in more secluded online spaces. I’d welcome everyone who’s interested to join in the effort. Feel free to inquire at an upcoming IndieWebCamp, Homebrew Website Club, event, or in online chat right now.

Huge group of diverse attendees at IndieWebSummit 2019 waving

 
Watched How I Make my Website & My Thinking Behind It: TiddlyWiki NodeJS, Wikis, and Internal Linking by  Brandon Hall Brandon Hall from YouTube

This is how I edit and update my website and how I think about the way I've been structuring the website . The main tools that I use for this are TiddlyWiki NodeJS, any modern web browser, simple command line scripts, and FileZilla. Links to these are below.

Also on PeerTube at https://peertube.mastodon.host/videos...

This is really awesome. Brandon is using a private TiddlyWiki to generate a static website! This is so very IndieWeb. If he’s available, he should come to the next Homebrew Website Club for San Diego or the online West Coast version.
RSVPed Attending ONLINE: Homebrew Website Club West Coast March 18, 2020
Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00pm (America/Los_Angeles)

Out of an abundance of caution regarding COVID-19 (coronavirus), we have decided to switch the March 18th meetup to an online-only meetup.

We will provide a Zoom video conference link 20 minutes before the meetup here and in the IndieWeb chat.

RSVPed Attending ONLINE: IndieWeb Meetup NYC March 18, 2020
Wed 6:00 - 8:00pm (America/New_York)

Join us for an evening of IndieWeb personal site demos and discussions! Any questions? Ask in the chatroom! Your hosts will be Marty McGuire and Jason McIntosh (who are schmarty and jmac in the chat room, respectively).

Normally our meetups happen at a venue in New York City, but as a COVID-19 countermeasure, we are meeting online this month instead. We will provide a Zoom video conference link 20 minutes before the meetup here and in the IndieWeb chat.

This meetup aims to bring together folks in the New York City area — but hey, it's on the internet, so the rest of y'all can come by if you want, too.

Listened to The one thing I wish I'd done when I first started my design career by Craig BurgessCraig Burgess from getdoingthings.com

There's lots of things I wish I would have done when I first started my design career, but this one is a big one. The worst bit? It's taken me 15 years to realise it.

Jamie Tanna Bookmarked: The one thing I wish I’d done when I first started my design career ()

In this 9 minute podcast, Craig Burgess speaks about how he wished he’d got started on his Personal Website and doing more blogging early on in his career. Craig also speaks about the IndieWeb and why everyone should get involved.

For Homebrew Website Club Wednesday, even though I didn’t make it to an in-person meetup I did manage to make some reasonable visible progress on my website.

I hacked together some tweaks to add the following:

  • Improved support in my theme for time related microformats including dt-published and dt-updated
  • Because I post so frequently, I added a visible timestamp next to the date so it’s easier to follow my timeline of posts.
  • I removed the data for my location, weather, and syndication links from the_body of my posts and appended it to my post meta data. This should prevent it from showing up in Webmentions to others’ websites or in syndicated copies, but still be available to parsers to attach that data to my posts in readers and other services.
  • I modified my CSS so that the text in the Simple Location and Syndication Links plugins matches that of the rest in its section.
  • I added a cute little bullhorn icon in front of my Syndication Links so that it has some parallelism with the rest of the meta data on my site.
  • I’d always liked the idea of adding in related posts data on my site, but didn’t like how it had worked in the past. Things were even worse with replying to other people’s posts as my markup (and far too many others I’ve seen in the WordPress world) was hacky and caused the related posts data to show up in their Webmentions sent to other sites. I looked through some of Jetpack’s documentation and figured out how to remove their Related Posts functionality from the_body, where it defaults, and append it instead to the post meta section of my posts. It’s not perfect yet, but it’s much closer to how I’d like it. Best of all, that data shouldn’t show up in my replies to other sites now either! I had disabled the functionality ages ago because it made me feel like a rude-IndieWebber.

With IndieWebCamp Online 2020 coming up this weekend, I hope to fix a few outstanding issues and roll these changes up into my open sourced IndieWeb Twenty Fifteen WordPress theme as my hackday project. If you’re using it on your own site, do let me know. Not that I can promise to fix it if it’s broken in places, but I’d at least like to know how it’s working out for you or where it could be improved.

Things left over to fix:

  • Simple Location data still needs some CSS help to display the way I want it to.
  • I need to target the Simple Location icon so I can have its color match that of the other icons.
  • Because so many of my posts don’t have titles, I’ll need to tweak something there so that the Jetpack related posts will pick up better meta data as a pseudo-title instead of displaying the relatively context-less commentary that appears in the_body
  • It may take a day or two for the related posts to populate properly, but I should make sure that it’s putting out relevant/interesting results.
  • Is it worth adding a default featured photo for the related posts that don’t have one? Could I pull one from other meta fields for some classes of posts?
Replied to Mentioning for Webmention practice by Stephen Locker (sjlocks.com)
Thank you, Jeremy, for helping me along on getting these tools figured out. Very few things about the web have excited me as much as learning about the IndieWeb work that has been ongoing.
Stephen, I came across your post via your comments on Jeremy’s site and noticed that you’re in the LA area.

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Homebrew Website Club meetup here, and to my knowledge I don’t think anyone has ever done a micro.blog meetup here.

Would you be interested in attending or even helping co-organize one in the next month?

Replied to Starting an IndieWeb Homebrew Website Club by Jeremy Felt (jeremyfelt.com)
Starting things is fun. Narrating things as you go is… funner. Just about a month ago I joined the IndieWeb chat via Slack, which is connected to IRC and a web chat as well. I haven’t actually participated, but I’ve been getting the feel of conversations and checking out a bunch of the materia...
Congrats this is awesome!
Even doing the cutting/pasting from the wiki page to set up an event can sometimes be harrowing, so kudos for sticking with that part.

The part I got hung up on the most here was actually adding my name in the RSVP. The code seemed to suggest that adding would work, but it kept showing me “Template:Jeremyfelt.com” instead. I then poked around and saw that others had redirects setup, so I created a page titled “jeremyfelt” and added a wiki redirect to my user page and changed the code to , but it then said “Template:jeremyfelt” and I knew I was going nowhere. Finally, I updated it with standard URL syntax: [[jeremyfelt|Jeremy Felt]] and my name appeared as expected. No cool picture next to it or anything, but I’ll figure that at some point. This is all wiki stuff I probably used to know but have completely forgotten.

Some of this is relatively arcane and custom templated MediaWiki business. Here’s a link that explains most of it: https://indieweb.org/wikifying#How_to_Join_the_IndieWeb_Wiki

Feel free to hop into the helpful chat and most are ready and happy to try to help you out when you get stuck or provide pointers.
— Annotated December 19, 2019 at 01:31PM

Replied to Agenda for Nov. 22nd Meeting by Todd ConawayTodd Conaway (Teaching and Learning on the Open Web)

We should make some agreements about our focus.

  • Are we continuting with various tools and sharing them on this site?
  • Should we focus more on building out our own domains and share that process?
  • Both? Other? 
  • Where shall we go?
Todd, I’ve randomly come across this post today and thought I’d toss out some additional ideas to consider if you haven’t already made up your minds.

If you’re thinking about doing something like WithKnown (aka Known, the CMS your post is on), and interested in the WordPress portion, you might consider doing a full/partial Domain of One’s Own program through Reclaim Hosting or even rolling your own. Even if you go small with just a few classes, you might consider adapting the Homebrew Website Club model at your site where you invite students to tinker around, help each other out, and then show off or demonstrate their work. The related IndieWeb wiki and online chat are free to join and can provide a wealth of information and help for students (and educators!) working at owning their own domains.

Incidentally, if you’re unaware, WordPress now has a suite of plugins that will allow it to have a lot of the site-to-site communication capabilities that Known does. I’ve not done it before, but I’m fairly certain you could run it on a multiuser installation of WordPress much the same way you’re using http://janevangalen.com/cms/.

Another interesting option would be to have students try out accounts on micro.blog which are relatively inexpensive, though I suspect if you touched base with Manton Reece and explained what you were doing, he might offer free or significantly reduced hosting for a reasonable period of time. I know he’s given away a year of free hosting to attendees of IndieWebCamps who are starting out with their own domains. If he did then you might be able to use some institutional funds to purchase domains for students to get them started.

I’m happy to spitball ideas in these areas if you’re interested. I’m glad to see others experimenting around with the ideas around DoOO and IndieWeb for Education!

By the way, good on you for opening up your planning process for teaching and learning on the open web. It certainly sets a useful example for others who are exploring and following in your footsteps.

Read IndieWeb Meetup by John Chidgey (techdistortion.com)
Once I knew the conference dates in the States I realised that the IndieWeb meetup in Austin would be happening on the first Wednesday of the month, which was an evening when I would be in Houston. Noting it was a mere 2.5 hour drive (far closer than a 28 hour door to door flight) I decided to drop by.
Replied to a tweet by Cathie LeBlancCathie LeBlanc (Twitter)
“@jgmac1106 We don't yet have meetups but we should! @mburtis @actualham @PSUOpenCoLab”
Perhaps you might borrow the set up of Homebrew Website Club so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel? You can always change the name to something like DoOO or Domains Meetup, but it would give you a place to start. Like Greg indicated I’m happy to help remotely as well.