Replied to Mentioning for Webmention practice by Stephen Locker (sjlocks.com)
Thank you, Jeremy, for helping me along on getting these tools figured out. Very few things about the web have excited me as much as learning about the IndieWeb work that has been ongoing.
Stephen, I came across your post via your comments on Jeremy’s site and noticed that you’re in the LA area.

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Homebrew Website Club meetup here, and to my knowledge I don’t think anyone has ever done a micro.blog meetup here.

Would you be interested in attending or even helping co-organize one in the next month?

Replied to Starting an IndieWeb Homebrew Website Club by Jeremy Felt (jeremyfelt.com)
Starting things is fun. Narrating things as you go is… funner. Just about a month ago I joined the IndieWeb chat via Slack, which is connected to IRC and a web chat as well. I haven’t actually participated, but I’ve been getting the feel of conversations and checking out a bunch of the materia...
Congrats this is awesome!
Even doing the cutting/pasting from the wiki page to set up an event can sometimes be harrowing, so kudos for sticking with that part.

The part I got hung up on the most here was actually adding my name in the RSVP. The code seemed to suggest that adding would work, but it kept showing me “Template:Jeremyfelt.com” instead. I then poked around and saw that others had redirects setup, so I created a page titled “jeremyfelt” and added a wiki redirect to my user page and changed the code to , but it then said “Template:jeremyfelt” and I knew I was going nowhere. Finally, I updated it with standard URL syntax: [[jeremyfelt|Jeremy Felt]] and my name appeared as expected. No cool picture next to it or anything, but I’ll figure that at some point. This is all wiki stuff I probably used to know but have completely forgotten.

Some of this is relatively arcane and custom templated MediaWiki business. Here’s a link that explains most of it: https://indieweb.org/wikifying#How_to_Join_the_IndieWeb_Wiki

Feel free to hop into the helpful chat and most are ready and happy to try to help you out when you get stuck or provide pointers.
— Annotated December 19, 2019 at 01:31PM

Replied to Agenda for Nov. 22nd Meeting by Todd ConawayTodd Conaway (Teaching and Learning on the Open Web)

We should make some agreements about our focus.

  • Are we continuting with various tools and sharing them on this site?
  • Should we focus more on building out our own domains and share that process?
  • Both? Other? 
  • Where shall we go?
Todd, I’ve randomly come across this post today and thought I’d toss out some additional ideas to consider if you haven’t already made up your minds.

If you’re thinking about doing something like WithKnown (aka Known, the CMS your post is on), and interested in the WordPress portion, you might consider doing a full/partial Domain of One’s Own program through Reclaim Hosting or even rolling your own. Even if you go small with just a few classes, you might consider adapting the Homebrew Website Club model at your site where you invite students to tinker around, help each other out, and then show off or demonstrate their work. The related IndieWeb wiki and online chat are free to join and can provide a wealth of information and help for students (and educators!) working at owning their own domains.

Incidentally, if you’re unaware, WordPress now has a suite of plugins that will allow it to have a lot of the site-to-site communication capabilities that Known does. I’ve not done it before, but I’m fairly certain you could run it on a multiuser installation of WordPress much the same way you’re using http://janevangalen.com/cms/.

Another interesting option would be to have students try out accounts on micro.blog which are relatively inexpensive, though I suspect if you touched base with Manton Reece and explained what you were doing, he might offer free or significantly reduced hosting for a reasonable period of time. I know he’s given away a year of free hosting to attendees of IndieWebCamps who are starting out with their own domains. If he did then you might be able to use some institutional funds to purchase domains for students to get them started.

I’m happy to spitball ideas in these areas if you’re interested. I’m glad to see others experimenting around with the ideas around DoOO and IndieWeb for Education!

By the way, good on you for opening up your planning process for teaching and learning on the open web. It certainly sets a useful example for others who are exploring and following in your footsteps.

Read IndieWeb Meetup by John Chidgey (techdistortion.com)
Once I knew the conference dates in the States I realised that the IndieWeb meetup in Austin would be happening on the first Wednesday of the month, which was an evening when I would be in Houston. Noting it was a mere 2.5 hour drive (far closer than a 28 hour door to door flight) I decided to drop by.
Replied to a tweet by Cathie LeBlancCathie LeBlanc (Twitter)
“@jgmac1106 We don't yet have meetups but we should! @mburtis @actualham @PSUOpenCoLab”
Perhaps you might borrow the set up of Homebrew Website Club so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel? You can always change the name to something like DoOO or Domains Meetup, but it would give you a place to start. Like Greg indicated I’m happy to help remotely as well.
Replied to a tweet by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (Twitter)
Perhaps you were thinking of Tim Clarke (@FloatingTim) or Lora Taub (@ltaub)? That would give you 4 not counting their students that might be interested. That’s also more than enough to do a Homebrew Website Club on a regular basis too.

I know that some have set up remove viewing/remote attendance parties for Camps/Summit in the past–not a bad idea Greg!

IndieWeb Summit 2019 
What to expect (w/ some remote attendance tips)

Replied to a tweet by Mo PelzelMo Pelzel (Twitter)
“Seeing good examples of existing domains is crucial for showing students what is possible in creating their own domain, says @CassieNooyen #domains19”
This is a lot of the value behind the idea of Homebrew Website Club and even the early blogosphere. Seeing interesting/useful things others have is likely to make you want that thing too. #​KeepingUpWithTheDomains #​Domains19

❤️ Seeing good examples of existing domains is crucial for showing students what is possible in creating their own domain, says @CassieNooyen

Liked Mo Pelzel on Twitter (Twitter)

👓 Loveland Public Library to Host Free Beginners WordPress Class Online May 22, 2019 | WP Tavern

Read Loveland Public Library to Host Free Beginners WordPress Class Online May 22, 2019 (WordPress Tavern)
Public libraries are one of the few remaining community centers where people freely pass on valuable skills to neighbors young and old. In addition to offering free access to books, computers, and …
This library looks like it’s essentially hosting a WordPress-sepecific Homebrew Website Club and doing something in the wild that Greg McVerry and I think would be a great public model.

📅 Virtual Homebrew Website Club Meetup on May 15, 2019

Are you building your own website? Indie reader? Personal publishing web app? Or some other digital magic-cloud proxy? If so, come on by and join a gathering of people with like-minded interests. Bring your friends who want to start a personal web site. Exchange information, swap ideas, talk shop, help work on a project…

Everyone of every level is welcome to participate! Don’t have a domain yet? Come along and someone can help you get started and provide resources for creating the site you’ve always wanted.

This virtual HWC meeting is for site builders who either can’t make a regular in-person meeting or don’t yet have critical mass to host one in their area. It will be hosted on Google Hangouts.

More Details

Join a community of like-minded people building and improving their personal websites. Invite friends that want a personal site.

  • Work with others to help motivate yourself to create the site you’ve always wanted to have.
  • Ask questions about things you may be stuck on–don’t let stumbling blocks get in the way of having the site you’d like to have.
  • Finish that website feature or blog post you’ve been working on
  • Burn down that old website and build something from scratch
  • Share what you’ve gotten working
  • Demos of recent breakthroughs

Skill levels: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Any questions? Need help? Need more information? Ask in chat: https://chat.indieweb.org/indieweb/

RSVP

Add your optional RSVP in the comments below; by adding your indie RSVP via webmention to this post; or by RSVPing to one of the syndicated posts below:
Indieweb.org event: https://indieweb.org/events/2019-05-15-homebrew-website-club#Virtual_Americas_West
Twitter “event”: https://twitter.com/ChrisAldrich/status/1122956290756530176
Meetup.com: https://www.meetup.com/IndieWeb-Homebrew-Website-Club-Los-Angeles/events/261026321/

👓 Festive indieweb and selfhosting | voss.co

Read Festive indieweb and selfhosting by voss voss (Left handed typing since 2017)
Holiday is on, and apart from relaxing with the family, I aim to look into a bunch of stuff before I'm back at the factory in January. My Indieweb life is coming on well, thanks to Known, and the community in London. I attended my first couple of Homebrew Website Club meetups in town in 20...

📅 RSVP for Homebrew Website Club (vHWC) on November 14, 2018

RSVPed Attending Homebrew Website Club (vHWC) on November 14, 2018
Virtual HWC for site builders who either can’t make a regular in-person meeting or don’t yet have critical mass to host one in their area. Everyone of all levels is welcome to participate remotely! Hosted on Google Hangouts. Virtual on Pacific Time. We will be using Google Hangouts; a link to the hangout will be posted here closer to the date.
  • 18:30–19:30 PST (2:30–3:30 UTC, 21:30–22:30 EST): Quiet Writing hours: Ask for help, write code, or just talk.
  • 19:30–21:00 PST (3:30–5:00 UTC, 22:30–00:00 EST): Demos, followed by talking through recent IndieWeb news.