Not getting enough of this week? Bring your ideas to IndieWebCamp East this weekend and let’s go hands-on to build and experiment with them! Free registration is still open.
https://2020.indieweb.org/east
Liked a tweet (Twitter)
Bookmarked ATI 2019-20 Webinar Series (Academic Technology at USNH)

USNH Academic Technology Institute Presents the 2019-20 Open Ed Webinar Series The next in the series is Feb 6 at 7:00 pm -  Ungrading: Pedagogical Possibilities for Going Beyond the Grade. Hosted by Robin DeRosa of Plymouth State University. Register here!  

These webinars are designed for past and present ATI Ambassadors as a way to continue our learning and sharing help keep us current on trends in Open Education. At ATI 2019, ambassadors identified key areas of interest that they wanted to learn more about and explore more in depth.

Replied to Agenda for Nov. 22nd Meeting by Todd ConawayTodd Conaway (Teaching and Learning on the Open Web)

We should make some agreements about our focus.

  • Are we continuting with various tools and sharing them on this site?
  • Should we focus more on building out our own domains and share that process?
  • Both? Other? 
  • Where shall we go?
Todd, I’ve randomly come across this post today and thought I’d toss out some additional ideas to consider if you haven’t already made up your minds.

If you’re thinking about doing something like WithKnown (aka Known, the CMS your post is on), and interested in the WordPress portion, you might consider doing a full/partial Domain of One’s Own program through Reclaim Hosting or even rolling your own. Even if you go small with just a few classes, you might consider adapting the Homebrew Website Club model at your site where you invite students to tinker around, help each other out, and then show off or demonstrate their work. The related IndieWeb wiki and online chat are free to join and can provide a wealth of information and help for students (and educators!) working at owning their own domains.

Incidentally, if you’re unaware, WordPress now has a suite of plugins that will allow it to have a lot of the site-to-site communication capabilities that Known does. I’ve not done it before, but I’m fairly certain you could run it on a multiuser installation of WordPress much the same way you’re using http://janevangalen.com/cms/.

Another interesting option would be to have students try out accounts on micro.blog which are relatively inexpensive, though I suspect if you touched base with Manton Reece and explained what you were doing, he might offer free or significantly reduced hosting for a reasonable period of time. I know he’s given away a year of free hosting to attendees of IndieWebCamps who are starting out with their own domains. If he did then you might be able to use some institutional funds to purchase domains for students to get them started.

I’m happy to spitball ideas in these areas if you’re interested. I’m glad to see others experimenting around with the ideas around DoOO and IndieWeb for Education!

By the way, good on you for opening up your planning process for teaching and learning on the open web. It certainly sets a useful example for others who are exploring and following in your footsteps.

Followed Amy Nelson (Sirius Reflections: History, Animals, and Networked Learning)

Sirius Reflections presents the musings of Amy Nelson, who teaches history (mostly Russian), studies animals (mostly domestic), plays with digital media and technologies (mostly related to history and animals), practices yoga (for peace), runs (for sanity), and knits (for peace and sanity).

The hub for my networked learning and research activities is amynelson.net.

Some recent work in the feed reader and discovery space

I’ve noticed a lot of quiet, but very interesting and heartening feed reader and discovery work going on in the IndieWeb and related communities lately, so I thought I’d highlight it briefly for those who are interested in the topic, but may not have been following as closely:

  • Inoreader has been working on a beta product that will make following social feeds in Twitter, Micro.blog, the Fediverse, and even IndieWeb sites with h-entry easier and prettier.
  • Kicks Condor has been iterating and doing some interesting work on the FraidyCat reader over the past few weeks.
  • Malcolm Blaney has a fantastic little feed reader in his Unicyclic site (not to mention that he’s also got a cool looking IndieWeb as a Service site with i.haza.website that I desperately want to have time to try out).
  • The volume of different and interesting content going into IndieWeb.xyz as a discovery hub has been increasing lately.
  • I’ve been admiring the discovery/aggregation work of Terry Greene on his OpenLearnerPatchbook and OpenFacultyPatchbook sites within the education space.
  • CJ Eller and others have been contributing to Blogging Futures as an extended online conversation in the form of an aggregated blogchain.

And none of this even touches on the excellent continuing work on Microsub readers which continues to astound me. Even with all of this activity, I’m sure I’m missing some fun little gems, so please don’t hesitate to mention them.

Read FemEdTech Quilt of Care and Justice in Open Education Quilt #OER20 by Frances Bell (OER20)
This is an open invitation to contribute to the FemEdTech Quilt of Care and Justice in Open Education. Our Call for Participation complements the Call for contributions to OER20 with its theme of C…

craftivism

a neologism to me, though the broader idea isn’t with respect to the pussy hats made/worn during the 2017 inaugural.
–November 19, 2019 at 09:40AM

This article has several examples of other examples of craftivism as well.

👓 For-profit, faux-pen, and critical conversations about the future of learning materials | Rajiv Jhangiani, Ph.D.

Read For-profit, faux-pen, and critical conversations about the future of learning materials by Rajiv Jhangiani, Ph.D. (Rajiv Jhangiani, Ph.D.)
I remember the first time I heard the term “free riders” being used in the context of the open education movement. It was at the Open Education Conference in 2015 in Vancouver when, dur…

Of course the Open Education conference is just an open education conference and it certainly isn’t the only place to have these conversations. Regional events such as the Northeast OER Summit, the Cascadia Open Education Summit, Wisconsin’s E-ffordability Summit, the Statewide Colorado OER conference and others are wonderful options. Further afield, the OER conference and the Open Education Global conference are both events that welcome critical conversations. As do other events like Digital Pedagogy Lab and the many virtual conference hallway conversations facilitated by Virtually Connecting.

Nice list of open education and OER related conferences and communities.

👓 The Crumbling of the OpenEd Coalition | e-Literate | Michael Feldstein

Read The Crumbling of the OpenEd Coalition by Michael FeldsteinMichael Feldstein (e-Literate)
At the OpenEd conference this week, David Wiley made an announcement that was more significant than it may have sounded.
An interesting case study about a community and some decisions it will have to make going forward.

👓An OpenEd Conference Update | iterating toward openness | David Wiley

Read An OpenEd Conference Update by David WileyDavid Wiley (iterating toward openness)
After two amazing keynotes at #OpenEd19 this morning, I read the following statement to conference attendees:   In 2003 I invited a small group of about forty people interested in open content…

🔖 Full Spectrum Learning – Elevating Learning at St. Norbert College

Bookmarked Full Spectrum Learning – Elevating Learning at St. Norbert College (fullspectrumlearning.knight.domains)
Full Spectrum Learning (FSL) is St. Norbert College’s attempt to embrace and encourage diverse teaching and learning practices that elevate student learning. Because we at St. Norbert aspire to cultivate in students a love of lifelong learning inspired by excellent teaching, it is of vital importance that we come together in community to explore the ever-changing breadth of teaching and learning modalities.
Hat tip:

Following Dr. Kay Oddone

Followed Dr. Kay Oddone (Linking Learning)

I am a lecturer and researcher at Queensland University of Technology, teaching Connected Learning, Inquiry Learning and Teacher Librarianship. My recently completed thesis investigates how teachers experience professional learning through personal learning networks. My research presents a conceptual model of of learning as a connected professional, which makes a significant contribution to theory and practice in the emerging field of professional networks and learning, enabled through the affordances of social technologies. While I have based my research on school teachers’ professional learning, I believe that my research has implications for professional learning opportunities of individuals in many different fields. I am very interested in how we can break down the silos that exist between different professions, and would love to hear from others who wish to explore this further. I also hope that my research will build foundations for rethinking how we bring connected learning more authentically into our pedagogical practice.

I have previously worked as a librarian and teacher, and have been fortunate to have had many wonderful learning opportunities across a variety of roles, in a variety of contexts. When I’m not working, I love reading, playing with my Jack Russell puppy, Ruby and Whippet, Alice, and cooking. I’d love to travel more and see the world, and eat my way around many different countries and cultures!

I’m planning on proposing an OER or other book related session at the upcoming IndieWebCamp New Haven next weekend. If you’re interested or want to propose other ideas for or , I hope you’ll join us either in-person or remotely.

Not sure what to expect at a camp? Here are some additional details for both in-person and remote attendance.