Read Registering & Displaying A Sidebar by Joseph Dickson (joseph-dickson.com/)
Registering a sidebar gives our theme an area where dynamic content can be added by Widgets and managed by the site owner using a drag an drop interface. This can include menus, custom HTML, Images and additional features introduced by Plugins. In this post we’ll register a sidebar, that will then be assigned dynamic widgets and displayed on our site’s footer.
Read Building a WordPress Theme From Scratch by Joseph DicksonJoseph Dickson (joseph-dickson.com)
I’m a fan of using WordPress to build custom websites. So I’ve decided to start a tutorial series and share how I go about building a theme from scratch. No frameworks or starter themes.
Joseph has a great little series here on creating WordPress themes from scratch. Can’t wait to read the rest of it.

Thoughts on Wikity for WordPress

I spun up a new instance of Wikity today at http://wikity.chrisaldrich.net/ to test it out for potential use as a personal online wiki. My goal was also to test out how it may or may not work with IndieWeb-based WordPress pieces too.

Below are my initial thoughts and problems.

The /home/ page has a lot of errors and warnings. (Never a good sign.)

It took me a few minutes to figure out where the Wik-it! bookmarklet button was hiding. Ideally it would have been in the start card that described how the bookmarklet would work (in addition to its original spot).

The Wikity theme seems to have some issues when using for http vs. https.

  • Less seems to work out of the box with https
  • The main card for entering “Name of Concept or Data” didn’t work at all under https. It only showed the title and wouldn’t save. Switching to http seemed to fix it and show the editor bar.

I’ve tried copying over from Aaron DavisWikity instance, but the cardbox seems to fail on my end.

  • Nothing seemed to work at all when I had my site as https. In fact, it redirected to a URL that seemed like it wanted to run update.php for some bizarre reason.
  • On http I at least get a card saying that the process failed.
    • Not sure what may be causing this.
    • Doesn’t seem to matter how many cards it is.
    • Perhaps it’s the fact that Aaron’s site is https? I notice that his checkbox export functionality duplicates his entire URL including the https:// within the export box which seems to automatically prepend http://
    • Copying to my own wiki seems to vaguely work using http, but failed on https.

Multiple * in the markdown editor functionality within WordPress doesn’t seem to format the way I’d expect.

Sadly, the original Wikity.cc site is down, but the theme still includes a link to it front and center on my website.

The home screen quick new card has some wonky CSS that off centers it.

Toggling full screen editing mode in new cards from the home screen makes them too big and obscures the UI making things unusable.

The primary multi-card home display doesn’t work well with markup the way the individual posts do.

The custom theme seems to be hiding some of the IndieWeb pieces. It may also be hampering the issuance of webmention as I tried sending one to myself and it only showed up as a pingback. It didn’t feel worth the effort to give the system a full IndieWeb test drive beyond this.

Doing this set up as a theme and leveraging posts seems like a very odd choice. From my reading, Mike Caulfield was relatively new to WordPress development when he made this. Even if he was an intermediate developer, he should be proud of his effort, including his attention to some minute bits of UI that others wouldn’t have considered. To make this a more ubiquitous solution, it may have been a better choice to create it as a plugin, do a custom post type for wiki cards and create a separate section of the database for them instead of trying to leverage posts. This way it could have been installed on any pre-existing WordPress install and the user could choose their own favorite theme and still have a wiki built into it. In this incarnation it’s really only meant to be installed on a fresh stand-alone site.

I only used the Classic Editor and didn’t even open up the Gutenberg box of worms in any of my tests.

Summary

The Wikity theme hasn’t been maintained in four years and it looks like it’s going to take quite a bit of work (or a complete refactoring) to make it operate the way I’d want it to. Given the general conceptualization it may make much more sense to try to find a better maintained solution for a wiki.

The overarching idea of what he was trying to accomplish, particularly within the education space and the OER space, was awesome. I would love nothing more than to have wiki-like functionality built into my personal WordPress website, particularly if I could have different presentations for the two sides but still maintain public/private versions of pieces and still have site-wide tagging and search. Having the ability to port data from site to site is a particularly awesome idea.

Is anyone actively still using it? I’d love to hear others’ thoughts about problems/issues they’ve seen. Is it still working for you as expected? Is it worth upgrading the broken bits? Is it worth refactoring into a standalone plugin?

Bookmarked Nightingale (WordPress.org)
Theme for NHS organisations based on the NHS Digital frontend framework. Highly customisable for all types of NHS organisations, from campaign sites to primary care providers to arms length bodies to community practices. This can also be used for non NHS organisations.
via Kevin Marks, who asks if we could add microformats to it, from 

Replied to What is up with the 2020 WP Theme by autumnautumn (Reclaim Hosting Community)

Curious if anyone has any experience with the new 2020 theme. I’m particularly confused as to why on fresh install it seems like an out of the box theme. But then if you touch the Customizer at all it fills your site with all this content for a musume in Sweden!?!?!

I like using the customizer to change the look and feel of my site but it seems I can’t use it with this theme without it doing this dump of content.

Can anyone point me to articles about this theme and why this content is supposed to help me? Maybe this is just a new way of working with a theme that I’m not used to?

Autumn, It’s been a while since I’ve done a fresh install, but I’ll confirm that what you’ve experienced is true. The base theme was shown off using a Swedish museum, so I wasn’t too surprised to hear that portion, but I too was a bit freaked out by the content they created on my behalf.

From what I can tell, they’re creating the content to help users realize how to set up a separate front page and a separate blog page which isn’t always intuitive to newcomers to the platform. Fortunately they haven’t made too much useless content and new users can simply either edit the front page the theme creates to something that suits them or just delete that page and create something of their own.

The only other content I can see that one might want to modify are the two footer widgets that you can either edit or simply delete or replace.

In all I think they’ve taken this route simply to give new users an idea about how they could set up their sites and give them an idea about the way the theme uses the Gutenberg editor. (It’s not too different from the long standing “Hello World” introductory post or the “Hi, this is a comment.” first comment on a fresh install.) For people new to WordPress this is probably pretty helpful, though for older hands it may be annoying. Fortunately the content the customizer creates is pretty minimal and easy to get rid of.

Read Add class attribute to WordPress "the_tags" markup by WebrockerWebrocker (Webrocker)
I'm in the process of gradually enhancing my site's markup with microformats, in order to "indiewebify" my site further. On thing I noticed while working on this at the Düsseldorf Indiewebcamp, is that WordPress (or the way my theme handles) tags on posts has no way to get an additional class insid...
David Shanske is sure to appreciate this if he hasn’t come across it. (I didn’t see it in his IW26 theme repo, so perhaps not?)
Read How To Add a Class to a Single Post in WordPress by Tom McFarlin (tommcfarlin.com)
As I’ve continued to work on the theme that I’m planning to use after Standard (and that I’ hoping to begin dogfooding within the next month or so), there have been a couple of features that I’ve wanted to implement for the sake of styling. For example, there are times where I want to be abl...
This was useful in my microformats project for the Twentyfifteen theme modifications today.
Liked Working through displaying Webmentions by Jeremy Felt (jeremyfelt.com)
Now that this site supports Webmentions, I’ve been having some fun digging into how I’d like them to be presented. The theme I’m using is very bare-bones. I created it using Underscores a couple years ago when I decided I had lost touch with the code I was using and for some reason wanted to g...
This should be an interesting experiment to watch.
Read How to Customize Twenty Fifteen to Make it Your Own (WPMU DEV Blog)
I recently praised the new Twenty Fifteen default WordPress theme for its clean look and focus on sharing beautiful content. I like its vertical rhythm, the layout of the sidebar and the responsive behavior. It really is a beautiful theme. But while I love how it looks, there’s always room to make it your own. Twenty Fifteen offers a few customization options but there is a lot more you may want to do to style it to your liking.
Looking for tidbits of inspiration for the new theme.
Read Taming a River Theme by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)
Origin Story
Matt worked long hours making an incredible theme for Footprints on the James course.1 It’s in WordPress but a large portion of the site ended up being built by hand as complexity increased and time dwindled.2 That means it’s hard-coded HTML/PHP.
Now because the site was so great, w...