👓 twenty eighteen | Matthias Pfefferle

Read zwanzigachtzehn by Matthias PfefferleMatthias Pfefferle (notiz.Blog)

2018 war ein durchwachsenes Jahr!

Mein privates „Ich“ hat letztes Jahr sehr viel Raum eingenommen und auch beruflich hat sich viel verändert.

Das heißt ich hatte generell wenig Zeit für mein online „Ich“ und wenn ich doch etwas Zeit hatte, war das Ergebnis meistens eher frustrierend.

My German is atrocious, but it’s well worth stumbling through to see what Matthias is up to lately, particularly with regard to his work on the IndieWeb.

I’ll have to revisit some of his work on OStatus and ActivityPub with respect to WordPress. It would be nice to be able to follow @chrisaldrich@boffosocko.com on Mastodon wouldn’t it?

Thanks, as always Pfefferle, for keeping the web open!

👓 My New Posting Workflow | grant.codes

Read My New Posting Workflow by Grant RichmondGrant Richmond (grant.codes)
So I have been working away on some new features on my site for quite a while now and it looks like everything is about ready. Honestly I don't particularly enjoy writing long-form content, so it is kind of strange that I have really enjoyed working on this new functionality.The Inspiration I was ra...

This is awesome Grant!

May have been a nice addition to add some links to the browser extensions (or maybe I missed them?) and make it more explicit that they’re publicly available. Can’t wait to try this out!

👓 Now | Christopher Chelpka

Read Now by Christopher ChelpkaChristopher Chelpka (christopherchelpka.com)
This now page was updated on January 11, 2018. I microblog about new updates when I shift my focus. Here’s What I’m Doing Now Because of my amazing church, I’m on a one-week study leave listening to some really smart theologians teach on the Trinity. I’m also researching the office of deacon...

Interesting and brief set up for a now page.

📑 Welcome to my online sandbox. | Joyce Garcia

Annotated Welcome to my online sandbox. by Joyce GarciaJoyce Garcia (Gratuitous Web Presence)
Then I learned about the IndieWeb movement and Micro.blog, and I fell in love with the Internet as I once hoped it would be: a place where people could congregate, converse, and learn from one another with somewhat minimal rancor — and without an overtly overarching need to make a buck with their “content.”  

📺 “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” Kirsten Gillenbrand/M. Night Shyamalan | CBS

Watched "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" Kirsten Gillenbrand/M. Night Shyamalan from CBS
With Stephen Colbert, Kirsten Gillibrand, M. Night Shyamalan, Jonathan Batiste. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.); filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan (Glass (2019));

📑 Contact | Devon Zuegel

Annotated Contact by Devon Zuegel (Devon's Site)

This site is where I can riff on ideas, be wrong, and learn from those mistakes. Of course I try to be correct, and I always write what I believe to be true, but the greatest value most often comes from someone messaging me to point out a body of research I missed or angle I misinterpreted.

In this vein, please don't hesitate to let me know what you think! The whole point is to share what I know and to learn the rest.  

In addition to collecting the quote above, I’ll also note that Devon’s site now has an RSS feed (which I’m positive it didn’t before), so one can now follow her writing there directly.

👓 I don’t want to be a brand. | Cheri Baker

Read I don't want to be a brand. by Cheri BakerCheri Baker (social.cheribaker.com)

I attended a training program on author marketing recently, and while I appreciated most of the advice, and the speaker was excellent, I’m struggling with one piece of it, which I’ll paraphrase here:

“You should write down your brand statement, and then EVERYTHING you communicate online (or around your customers) should be in line with that statement. In short, if it doesn’t advance your brand, don’t share or say it.”

And my heart rose up in revolt and shouted: F@CK THAT SH*T!

Some great sentiment here on just being a person.

📑 I don’t want to be a brand. | Cheri Baker

Annotated I don't want to be a brand. by Cheri BakerCheri Baker (social.cheribaker.com)

To participate in the economy, we’re encouraged to shape ourselves into a strategically pleasing form, always with a sale in mind.

Isn’t the phrase

we’re encouraged to shape ourselves into a strategically pleasing form

almost exactly what women have been attempting to fix with much of the feminist movement? We should all just be ourselves. Trying to “stay on message” is just painful. The message should be: “This is my life, and I’ll do with it as I please.”

📑 I don’t want to be a brand. | Cheri Baker

Annotated I don't want to be a brand. by Cheri BakerCheri Baker (social.cheribaker.com)

“You should write down your brand statement, and then EVERYTHING you communicate online (or around your customers) should be in line with that statement. In short, if it doesn’t advance your brand, don’t share or say it.”

And my heart rose up in revolt and shouted: F@CK THAT SH*T!

Almost as iconic as “I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not gonna take this anymore!”

📅 Changing the Conservation Conversation! | Innovate Pasadena, Friday Coffee Meetup

RSVPed Attending Innovate Pasadena, Friday Coffee Meetup: Changing the Conservation Conversation!

Friday, January 18, 2019
8:15 AM to 9:45 AM
at Cross Campus, 85 N. Raymond Avenue · Pasadena, CA

Less than 1% of the earth’s water is potable and suitable for our survival. Today, we are using up those resources faster than they are naturally replenished. By the year 2050 we will see the world population grow by 50%. Compound that growth with increased standards of living and increased per capita usage and there is a disaster in the making. As agriculture and residential water consumers battle over water rights, residential consumers will win in the short term. Will they really win in the end?

If we do nothing, our grandchildren will be faced with famine and lack of water on a global scale. Droughts like we are experiencing in the 9 western states give us a glimpse of what a future with limited potable water would be like. In a recent 5-year period, water prices increased 41%. Energy prices are rising at a similar rate. Fines for “bad behavior” are more common, but ineffective.

The only way to truly solve this dilemma is to make water conservation second nature. What are the characteristics of such a solution? Can we access the solution on a personal level? Come to the Friday MeetUp at Cross Campus on 1/18/19 to learn what you can do to join the movement toward intelligent water and energy solutions.

Bio:
Kerry Austin-Dunkijacobs - Disruptor for Good l Inventor l Water Conservation Advocate l Co-Founder l CEO
Epiphany Shower US l Intelligent Green Products
www.epiphanyshower.com

Kerry Austin-Dunkijacobs is a problem-solving visionary that creates solutions that are unique, simple to use, and provide uncompromising performance. A “conscious capitalist,” I listen to the spoken and unspoken needs of all the stakeholders that impact the products and companies that I envision and bring to life.

By focusing on Disruptive Innovation that creates widespread product adoption and continued enthusiastic use by consumers, I envision products that are so effective and aesthetically pleasing that they become the standard by which competitive products are measured.

My most recent product, the Epiphany!™ 1000 Digital Flow Optimizer, brings this philosophy to the Bath and Shower space. Saving a typical 50-60% in water and energy use, this device delivers Conservation without Compromise™, Benefits without Sacrifice™ and Savings without Effort™.

Vision must be complemented by the ability to execute. The most critical component of execution is the ability to identify the right talent to move a project along from the earliest concept stages through product development and on to marketing, manufacturing, distribution and customer service. The team we assembled at Intelligent Green Products and Epiphany Shower US brings together a unique blend of product development, business development, marketing, and finance needed to create successful products in today’s rapidly evolving markets.

Replied to RSS is not dead. Subscribing is alive. by Colin Devroe (cdevroe.com)

Sinclair Target, writing for Motherboard:

Today, RSS is not dead. But neither is it anywhere near as popular as it once was.

This isn’t the first nor the last article to cover the creation of the RSS standard, its rise to relative popularity with Google Reader, and its subsequent fall from popularity.

Colin, I saw this article last week and I agree with your thoughts. Your analysis and the concept of the fear of missing out is a strong one. It’s even more paralyizing when one is following feeds with longer and potentially denser articles instead of short status updates or even bookmarks.

RSS definitely needs a UI makeover. I’ve been enamored of the way that SubToMe has abstracted things to create a one click button typically with a “Follow Me” or “Subscribe” tag on it. It looks a whole lot more like the follow buttons on most social services, but this one can recommend a feed reader or provide a list of potential readers to add the subscription to. Cutting out several layers and putting the subscription into something where it can be immediately read certainly cuts through a lot of the UI problems generally presented to the average person. It would be nice to see more sites support this sort of functionality rather than needing the crufty pages full of XML and pages describing what RSS is, how it works, and how to add a particular site to a reader.

We’ve come a long way, but we still have a way to to continue on.