Read -30- (Wikipedia)
-30- has been traditionally used by journalists in North America to indicate the end of a story or article that is submitted for editing and typesetting. It is commonly employed when writing on deadline and sending bits of the story at a time, via telegraphy, teletype, electronic transmission, or paper copy, as a necessary way to indicate the end of the article. It is also found at the end of press releases.
Read Tombstone (typography) (Wikipedia)
In mathematics, the tombstone, halmos, end-of-proof, or Q.E.D. symbol "∎" (or "□") is a symbol used to denote the end of a proof, in place of the traditional abbreviation "Q.E.D." for the Latin phrase "quod erat demonstrandum", meaning "which was to be demonstrated". In magazines, it is one of the various symbols used to indicate the end of an article. In Unicode, it is represented as character U+220E ∎ END OF PROOF (HTML ∎). Its graphic form varies, as it may be a hollow or filled rectangle or square.
Read The Plain Text Project (plaintextproject.online)

Do you need big, feature-packed, and sometimes complex tool for your work, to stay organized, or keep track of your tasks?

Maybe not.

Maybe all you need is plain text. Yes, simple, old fashioned, unadorned, boring text. It sounds scary or alien, but it's not.

Plain text isn't just for the geek or the techie. Plain text isn't just for the academic or hardcore productivity hacker. Plain text is for anyone.

Read Redesigning my Blog Post Pages by Aaron PareckiAaron Parecki (Aaron Parecki)
I had a great time in the sessions at IndieWebCamp West yesterday! Today is project day, so I started the morning off listening to some chill tunes with other folks on the Zoom "hallway track" deciding what to work on. My blog post permalinks have been bothering me for a while, I feel like they are...
Bookmarked Type Scale - A Visual Calculator (type-scale.com)

A type tool by Jeremy Church

How to Use

I like to enter the base font-size for paragraph text. Then I select from the surrounding values for headers and small text.

There are no rules. Just experiment and have fun. Try using the values for line-height, margins or whatever, and see what works.

hat tip: gRegorLove
Watched Play this Game! The Elusive Letter G by Len Turner (Johns Hopkins Office of Communications) from Johns Hopkins University | YouTube

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University say most participants in a study couldn't pick out the correct form of lowercase g, a letter shape most of us have seen millions of times. Play this game to find out if you can spot the right g.

Read The ligatures in Kenneth C. Griffin Museum of Science and Industry by Matt Maldre (Spudart)
The Museum of Science and Industry is renaming the museum to be the “Kenneth C. Griffin Museum of Science and Industry” Sounds pretty silly right? Look at how long that name is. Plus, Chicagoans notoriously hate renaming buildings. The Chicago Tribune ran an article with selected Twitter reactions from Chicagoans. A typical Chicago response: Me? …
Bookmarked Relative Font Weights Considered Harmful by Den McHenryDen McHenry (denmchenry.com)

Not exactly, but who can resist writing a "considered harmful" article when you can get away with it?

The real harm is that you can very easily conceal the semantics conveyed by font-weight depending on the font that's rendered, which is not always in your control. This all depends on how you define the base weight to which your relative values refer, and (1) whether that base weight is actually available in the rendered font and (2) which value is substituted if it isn't.

You get a webmention, and you get a webmention, and…

👓 The world’s first code-free sparkline typeface | After the flood

Read The world’s first code-free sparkline typeface (After the flood)

Displaying charts in text without having to use code

Data can be hard to grasp however visualising it can make comprehension faster. Sparklines (tiny charts in text, like this: 123{10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100}789) are a useful tool, but creating them for the web has always required code and using them in word documents was previously impossible.

Sparks, now in its second release, is a family of 15 fonts (three variants in five weights each) that allows for the easy combination of text and visual data by removing the need for any technical know-how. By installing the Spark font you can use them immediately without the need for custom code.

Liked a post by AlonealastalovedalongtheAlonealastalovedalongthe (Toot Café)
All the hand painted signs I find disused in sheds and basements make me sad. I don't think the ability to print signs with computers and digital fonts actually made the world a better place. Definitely didn't make it more beautiful. Logos like the coca cola logo are static, dead imitations of beautiful handwritten scripts shoved in everyone's faces as a reminder of what once was a living, human pursuit rewarded by society.

👓 What do you want to do when you grow up, kid? | Robin Rendle

Read What do you want to do when you grow up, kid? by Robin Rendle (robinrendle.com)
I fell into web design via books. When I was maybe six or seven I remember reading about polar bears and how they hibernated in a large compendium about all sorts of natural habitats and curiosities ranging from foxes hunting in the desert and wild horses running on the Mongolian plains to Emperor penguins shivering in the Antarctic. And to this day I still remember that giant, double page spread of a bear and her cubs. It was a wondrous illustration but what piqued my curiosity was how the writer described hibernation.
What a great little story here. I may be biased because I love all of these types of things myself.

🔖 Sans Forgetica | RMIT

Bookmarked Sans Forgetica (sansforgetica.rmit)
Sans Forgetica is a typeface designed using the principles of cognitive psychology to help you to better remember your study notes. It was created by a multidisciplinary team of designers and behavioural scientists from RMIT University. Sans Forgetica is compatible with both PC and Mac operating systems. Download it for free today, or keep scrolling to learn more about how it was made.

📺 Sans Forgetica | The font to remember | RMIT University | YouTube

Watched Sans Forgetica | The font to remember from YouTube
Sans Forgetica is a typeface that has been specifically designed by academics at RMIT University to enhance memory retention.
Download the font and Chrome extension, or hear more from the team who created Sans Forgetica, at: http://sansforgetica.rmit
As I look at some of the websites being created for the EDU522 class, it’s exciting to see what people are creating and how they’re expressing themselves. As hinted at in the Who Am I module, I do think it may be useful for some to think about the readability and accessibility of their sites. Even simple things like the color of a background against text can make it unpleasant or difficult to read. For ideas on readability, I recommend Kevin Marks’ WIRED article How the Web Became Unreadable.1

Be creative and have fun, but remember the multiple audiences and communities who may not consume your content the same way you do.

References

1.
Marks K. How the Web Became Unreadable | Backchannel. WIRED. https://www.wired.com/2016/10/how-the-web-became-unreadable/. Published October 19, 2016. Accessed August 1, 2018.