👓 UX of Parenting: Teething | Greg McVerry

Read UX of Parenting: Teething by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
In every start-up we have sleepless nights. Yet nothing kept us up more than the pain of trying to add new data processing servers to each of the three instances we added to https://nuevacastra.glitch.me. At first we started each instance off on a small stream of data. It was a very bespoke system a...
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👓 undo | IndieWeb

Read undo (indieweb.org)
undo is a common action you can take (often a button or menu item) to reverse the effects of the previous action, as if the action had never occurred; on the indieweb, you may want to undo a post, a deletion, or an update.
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IndieWebCamp NYC on 09/28-29

Want to see what the bleeding edge of the web and the future of social media looks like? Join an inclusive and welcoming group of creators at IndieWebCamp NYC on 9/28-29 either in person or live streaming.
https://indieweb.org/2018/NYC

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👓 The Narrow Passage of Gortahig | Dan Cohen

Read The Narrow Passage of Gortahig by Dan Cohen (Dan Cohen)

You don’t see it until you’re right there, and even then, you remain confused. Did you miss a turn in the road, or misread the map? You are now driving through someone’s yard, or maybe even their house. You slow to a stop.

On rural road R575, also known as the Ring of Beara and more recently rebranded as part of the Wild Atlantic Way, you are making your way along the northern coast of the Beara Peninsula in far southwestern Ireland. You are in the hamlet of Gortahig, between Eyeries, a multicolored strip of connected houses on the bay, and Allihies, where the copper mines once flourished. The road, like the landscape, is raw, and it is disconcertingly narrow, often too narrow for two cars to pass one another.

An interesting example of how small local decisions can have complex and interesting ramifications in the future.

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👓 Introduction – The new Gutenberg editing experience | WordPress

Read Introduction: The new Gutenberg editing experience (WordPress)
“Gutenberg” is the codename for the new WordPress editor focus. The goal of this focus is to create a new post and page editing experience that makes it easy for anyone to create rich post layouts. This was the kickoff goal: The editor will endeavour to create a new page and post building experi...
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👓 Giving Up On IndieWeb | Glenn 2.0

Read Giving Up On IndieWeb by Glenn DixonGlenn Dixon (glenn.thedixons.net)
(Further update:  webmentions are working!!!) (UPDATE: It’s now been a year since I first posted this. Just today I discovered a year-old blog post which mentioned this one, and an ensuing discussion. Of course I knew nothing of this because – well, I couldn’t get webmentions to work! I have ...
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Reply to Sara Soueidan about front end development feeds

Replied to a tweet by Sara SoueidanSara Soueidan (Twitter)

I tinker on my own website and frequently write about IndieWeb related technologies because the web is my social media platform. The feed you might appreciate most is https://boffosocko.com/category/indieweb/feed/.

I have feeds for nearly every tag/category or post type on my site for convenience (just add /feed/ to almost anything). You could subscribe to my firehose feed, but I suspect even my mother would tire of it quickly.

I’m curious if you have OPML files or similar bundles of feeds you follow that are shareable or subscribe-able?

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👓 Tech Notes: Why not add an option for that? | Neugierig.org

Read Tech Notes: Why not add an option for that? (neugierig.org)
If you've ever developed software you've surely had users ask you to add an option. "Rather than forcing everyone into behavior A," they'll reason, "why not add an option so users can choose between behaviors A and B?" This post is an attempt at producing a canonical consolidated answer to why the answer to this is often "no".
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👓 Controlling How Webmentions are Rendered | ruk.ca

Read Controlling How Webmentions are Rendered by Peter RukavinaPeter Rukavina (ruk.ca)
Ton continues to wrap his head around Webmention, and wonders about how mentions should be displayed on the “mentioned” site: What strikes me as odd now is how little control I have over how the Webmention and Semantic Linkbacks plugins actually deal with webmention data. The stuff I’d like to...
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👓 A Close Look at How Facebook’s Retreat From the News Has Hurt One Particular Website—Ours | Slate

Read A Close Look at How Facebook’s Retreat From the News Has Hurt One Particular Website—Ours by Will Oremus (Slate Magazine)
New data shows the impact of Facebook’s pullback from an industry it had dominated (and distorted).

(Roose, who has since deleted his tweet as part of a routine purge of tweets older than 30 days, told me it was intended simply as an observation, not a full analysis of the trends.)

Another example of someone regularly deleting their tweets at regular intervals. I’ve seem a few examples of this in academia.


It’s worth noting that there’s a difference between NewsWhip’s engagement stats, which are public, and referrals—that is, people actually clicking on stories and visiting publishers’ sites. The two have generally correlated, historically, and Facebook told me that its own data suggests that continues to be the case. But two social media professionals interviewed for this story, including one who consults for a number of different publications, told me that the engagement on Facebook posts has led to less relative traffic. This means publications could theoretically be seeing less ad revenue from Facebook even if their public engagement stats are holding steady.


From Slate’s perspective, a comment on a Slate story you see on Facebook is great, but it does nothing for the site’s bottom line.


(Remember when every news site published the piece, “What Time Is the Super Bowl?”)

This is a great instance for Google’s box that simply provides the factual answer instead of requiring a click through.


fickle audiences available on social platforms.

Here’s where feed readers without algorithms could provide more stability for news.

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👓 GitHub Is Microsoft’s $7.5 Billion Undo Button | Bloomberg

Read GitHub Is Microsoft’s $7.5 Billion Undo Button by Paul Ford (Bloomberg.com)
Steve Ballmer spent years hating on open source software. Satya Nadella recognized that the service has become indispensable to programmers.

A nice analysis piece about the GitHub purchase for the non-technical. It highlights the fact that a nice and simple UI can be worth its weight in gold.

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👓 Invisible asymptotes | Remains of the Day

Read Invisible asymptotes by Eugene Wei (Remains of the Day)
My first job at Amazon was as the first analyst in strategic planning, the forward-looking counterpart to accounting, which records what already happened. We maintained several time horizons for our forward forecasts, from granular monthly forecasts to quarterly and annual forecasts to even five and ten year forecasts for the purposes of fund-raising and, well, strategic planning.

A great long read covering some interesting portions of UX and strategy in the future of social. There are some useful tidbits for the IndieWeb to consider here.

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👓 human beings | Khürt Williams

Read human beings (Island in the Net)
I’m saddened that a blog post linking to another blog post might need to include a disclaimer even if some of it is in jest. A part of me thinks we’re headed down a path of permission based interactions. Both online and offline. If that happens during my lifetime I’ll exit this experiment called the USA, to places where human beings are still human beings.

I was being facetious and satirical, but all the same… This is just the type of response I was aiming at eliciting.

Fantastic photo, by the way!

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Replied to Add ability to edit Linkbacks type and fields manually · Issue #75 · pfefferle/wordpress-semantic-linkbacks (GitHub)
Add these fields to the edit comment form in the admin. Partially this is also to allow viewing of this data in the admin.

Some additional related thoughts/ideas:

For more easily editing webmentions (aka comments) and their types it would be nice if the Comments UI page (usually found at /wp-admin/edit-comments.php) could be modified to add some additional columns for improved UI/UX.

In particular it would be nice to have direct access to see and sort comments by the semantic_linkbacks_type field as well as potentially via dropdown UI to be able to modify the type (mention, reply, like, favorite, read, listen, etc.). In particular, I find I’d often like to take a basic webmention and turn it into a “reply” to show the full content (particularly while facepiling simple mentions) when it substantively adds to the discussion.

Until #166 is resolved it would be nice to also have easier manual access to be able to modify semantic_linkbacks_avatar in bulk when they either don’t exist or fail to resolve.

It would also be nice to be able to (via query parameters in the URL perhaps?) filter out certain webmention types in the Comment page view. As an example, this might allow someone to more easily see only replies without cluttering up the page with likes, bookmarks, etc. to more easily reply to commenters.

As a potential guide, there is a related plugin called Admin Columns which has some related code that allows adding arbitrary admin columns as well as editing and formatting them.

Mock example of additional columns for webmentions and types
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👓 Gmail’s biggest redesign is now live | The Verge

Read Gmail’s biggest redesign is now live by Vlad Savov (The Verge)
Snoozing, nudging, hover actions, and a new sidebar — it’s a mobile app on the web!

I’ve been using gmail for about 2 years now and am curious to see what this delivers though I do have to admit I’m itching to going back to my old methods of owning may own email and data.

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