🎧 “Bread from the Dead” | Our Daily Bread | Eat This Podcast

Listened to Bread from the Dead | Our Daily Bread 13 by Jeremy CherfasJeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast

It’s a good thing the Egyptians believed strongly in an afterlife and wanted to make sure their dead had an ample supply of bread. The bread and the tomb inscriptions tell us something about how grain was grown and bread baked. To really understand the process, however, you need to be a practical-minded archaeologist like Delwen Samuel, who first set out to replicate Egyptian bread.

Photo of a model from the tomb of Meketre, Metropolitan Musdeum of Art, Rogers Fund and Edward S. Harkness Gift, 1920.

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🎧 Tech Was Supposed to Be Society’s Great Equalizer. What Happened? | Crazy/Genius | The Atlantic

Listened to Tech Was Supposed to Be Society’s Great Equalizer. What Happened? by Derek ThompsonDerek Thompson from The Atlantic
In a special bonus episode of the podcast Crazy/Genius, the computer scientist and data journalist Meredith Broussard explains how “technochauvinism” derailed the dream of the digital revolution.

I was excited to hear Dr. Meredith Broussard, a brilliant colleague I’ve met via the Dodging the Memory Hole series of conferences, on this podcast from The Atlantic. I would recommend this special episode (one of their very best) to just about anyone. In particular there’s something to be gained in the people side of what the IndieWeb movement is doing as well as for their efforts towards inclusion.

From a broader perspective, I think there’s certainly something to be learned from not over-sensationalizing artificial intelligence. Looking at the history of the automobile as a new technology over a century ago is a pretty good parallel example. While it’s generally done a lot of good, the automobile has also brought along a lot of additional  societal problems, ills, and costs with it as well.

I hadn’t yet heard about her new book Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World which I’m ordering a copy of today. I suspect that it’s in the realm of great books like Cathy O’Neill’s Weapons of Math Distraction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy  which was also relevant to some of the topics within this podcast.

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🎧 ‘The Daily’: The Rampant Problem of Pregnancy Discrimination | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: The Rampant Problem of Pregnancy Discrimination by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

A New York Times investigation finds that many pregnant women are systematically sidelined at work, passed over for promotions and fired when they complain.

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🎧 ‘The Daily’: The Rampant Problem of Pregnancy Discrimination | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: The Rampant Problem of Pregnancy Discrimination by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

A New York Times investigation finds that many pregnant women are systematically sidelined at work, passed over for promotions and fired when they complain.

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👓 How Some Men Fake an 80-Hour Workweek, and Why It Matters | The New York Times

Read How Some Men Fake an 80-Hour Workweek, and Why It Matters (nytimes.com)
A look at how the professional world differs for men and women, and an implicit critique of a corporate culture that values long hours above all.
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📑 How Some Men Fake an 80-Hour Workweek, and Why It Matters | New York Times

Highlighted How Some Men Fake an 80-Hour Workweek, and Why It Matters (nytimes.com)
The result of this is easy to see: Those specifically requesting a lighter workload, who were disproportionately women, suffered in their performance reviews; those who took a lighter workload more discreetly didn’t suffer. The maxim of “ask forgiveness, not permission” seemed to apply.  
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👓 Jocelyn Bell Burnell Discovered Radio Pulsars in 1974, But the Credit Went to Her Advisor; In 2018, She Gets Her Due, Winning a $3 Million Physics Prize | Open Culture

Read Jocelyn Bell Burnell Discovered Radio Pulsars in 1974, But the Credit Went to Her Advisor; In 2018, She Gets Her Due, Winning a $3 Million Physics Prize (Open Culture)
Say you made a Nobel-worthy scientific discovery and the prize went to your thesis supervisor instead. How would you take it?
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👓 40 Years Later, Talking Heads’ Most Valuable Member Is Still Its Most Under-Recognized | Paper Mag

Read 40 Years Later, Talking Heads’ Most Valuable Member Is Still Its Most Under-Recognized (PAPER)
Bassist Tina Weymouth contributions are some of the band's most iconic.
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👓 Lenore Blum shocked the community with her sudden resignation from CMU. Here she tells us why. | Next Pittsburgh

Read Lenore Blum shocked the community with her sudden resignation from CMU. Here she tells us why. by Tracy Certo (NEXTpittsburgh)
This high-tech rockstar has done so much for women in the community, making her own experiences with sexism even more stunning.

Things like this are painful to hear, particularly given the recruitment and numbers that CMU has compiled over the past several years. I’m glad that Lenore and her husband have the wherewithal to do this and raise their voices to draw attention to it.

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👓 Serena Williams’s U.S. Open Loss Was Humiliating—But Not For Her | The Atlantic

Read Serena Williams's U.S. Open Loss Was Humiliating—But Not for Her by Gillian B. White (The Atlantic)
What happened to the superstar was shocking. It was not surprising.
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👓 Jodie Whittaker demanded equal pay to Peter Capaldi for Doctor Who | The Independent

Read Jodie Whittaker demanded equal pay to Peter Capaldi for Doctor Who (The Independent)
'Equal pay is a notion that should be supported!'
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👓 Why It’s So Hard to Be a Working Mom. Even at Facebook. | Wired

Read Why It's So Hard to Be a Working Mom. Even at Facebook. (WIRED)
Opinion: I was a data scientist and mom. Then I had to choose.

For Facebook to say that they can’t do this is simply stupid and insane.

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👓 Perspective | At U.S. Open, power of Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka is overshadowed by an umpire’s power play | Washington Post

Read At U.S. Open, power of Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka is overshadowed by an umpire’s power play by Sally JenkinsSally Jenkins (Washington Post)

‘A career of pushing boundaries': How Serena Williams has rewritten rules for women in tennis

Chair umpire Carlos Ramos managed to rob not one but two players in the women’s U.S. Open final. Nobody has ever seen anything like it: An umpire so wrecked a big occasion that both players, Naomi Osaka and Serena Williams alike, wound up distraught with tears streaming down their faces during the trophy presentation and an incensed crowd screamed boos at the court. Ramos took what began as a minor infraction and turned it into one of the nastiest and most emotional controversies in the history of tennis, all because he couldn’t take a woman speaking sharply to him.

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👓 Abortion is Immoral, Except When It Comes to My Mistresses | McSweeny’s

Read Abortion is Immoral, Except When It Comes to My Mistresses by Devorah Blachor (McSweeney's)
TIM: Life begins at conception. Pregnancy is a gift from God, which is why I’m cosponsoring this anti-abortion legislation after asking my lover to have an abortion. I’m 65 and she’s 32, but you probably figured that out already.
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👓 Talking to Boys the Way We Talk to Girls | New York Times

Read Talking to Boys the Way We Talk to Girls (New York Times)
Stereotypically macho messages limit children’s understanding of what it means to be a father, a man and a boy, as well.
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