Listened to Body of Law: Beyond Roe from On the Media | WNYC Studios

Justice Ginsburg says she wishes it had been another case, not Roe v. Wade, that SCOTUS heard as the first reproductive rights case. On the Media and The Guardian take a closer look.

A majority of Americans polled by CSPAN last year couldn't name a Supreme Court case. Of those who could, Roe v. Wade was by far the most familiar, with 40 percent able to name it. (Only five percent could name Brown v. Board of Education.) And since it was decided in 1973, a majority — roughly 70 percent — have consistently said they want Roe upheld, albeit with some restrictions on legal abortion.

But what do we really know about Roe? Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has often said she wishes it had been another case that the Supreme Court heard as the first reproductive freedom case instead. It was Susan Struck v. Secretary of Defense, and it came to the high court during the same term as Roe

The year was 1970, and the Air Force (like the other branches of the military) had a regulation banning female service members from having a family. If a servicewoman got pregnant, she would get discharged. Captain Susan Struck was a nurse serving in Vietnam, and she challenged the decision in court with Ginsburg as her lawyer. However, the court never heard the case because the Air Force changed their policy first. For this week's show, we partnered with The Guardian (read their story here) to learn more about Susan Struck’s fight and its bigger lessons for reproductive freedom and for women in the workplace. 

Our producer Alana Casanova-Burgess and The Guardian's health reporter Jessica Glenza spoke to Struck about the difficult decision she made to give her baby up for adoption in order to fight the regulation. Plus, we hear why legal scholars think this case "deserves to be honored by collective memory," and how Ginsburg's arguments to the Supreme Court differed from what the justices decided in Roe

Then:

- Slate's Dahlia Lithwick explains the threats to reproductive rights in the court right now;

Neil Siegel of Duke Law School puts the Struck case in context and discusses what better questions we could be asking about women's equality;

- activist and scholar Loretta Ross explains the tenets of reproductive justice and how they expand the frame beyond Roe and abortion;

- and Reva Siegel of Yale Law School tells the story of how abortion was discussed before 1973, including during the Women's Strike of 1970. And she describes the framework of ProChoiceLife, which expands the idea of what pro-life policy is. She is also the co-editor of Reproductive Rights and Justice Stories

Read The Guardian’s print version here, and share your story with Jessica Glenza if you were a woman serving in the military before 1976.

Music by Nicola Cruz, Kronos Quartet, and Mark Henry Phillips

📺 “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” Cartoon Thanks-travaganza | CBS

Watched "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" Cartoon Thanks-travaganza from CBS
With Stephen Colbert, Jonathan Batiste, Stay Human. Stephen and Jon's Cartoon Thanks-travaganza;
This was a simple, but great way to do a vacation episode with a look back at some prior great bits. Colbert working out with RBG was priceless.

👓 Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Hospitalized After Falling, Fracturing 3 Ribs | NPR

Read Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Hospitalized After Falling, Fracturing 3 Ribs (NPR.org)
The 85-year-old justice fell in her office at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday evening. She has been hospitalized for "observation and treatment."
After the last few days, this is the type of news that could give a person a heart attack. Democrats should have done far more to swing back the Senate.

🎞️ RBG (2018)

Watched RBG (2018) from CNN Films, Storyville Films
Directed by Julie Cohen, Betsy West. With Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Gloria Steinem, Nina Totenberg. A look at the life and work of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
At the age of 84, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has developed a breathtaking legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. But without a definitive Ginsburg biography, the unique personal journey of this diminutive, quiet warrior's rise to the nation's highest court has been largely unknown, even to some of her biggest fans - until now. RBG is a revelatory documentary exploring Ginsburg's exceptional life and career from Betsy West and Julie Cohen, and co-produced by Storyville Films and CNN Films.
An awesome little movie. It has a bigness in the theater with a large crowd that it may not have had if I’d watched it on television. Either way, a great documentary.