🔖 The Resurrection of Flinders Petrie | electricarchaeology.ca

Bookmarked The Resurrection of Flinders Petrie by Shawn Graham (electricarchaeology.ca)
The following is an extended excerpt from my book-in-progress, “An Enchantment of Digital Archaeology: Raising the Dead with Agent Based Models, Archaeogaming, and Artificial Intelligence”, which is under contract with Berghahn Books, New York, and is to see the light of day in the summer of 2020. I welcome your thoughts. The final form of this section will no doubt change by the time I get through the entire process. I use the term ‘golems’ earlier in the book to describe the agents of agent based modeling, which I then translate into archaeogames, which then I muse might be powered by neural network models of language like GPT-2.

🔖 The En-Gedi Scroll (2016) | Internet Archive

Bookmarked The En-Gedi Scroll (2016) (Internet Archive)

The data and virtual unwrapping results on the En-Gedi scroll. 

 
See the following papers for more information:
Seales, William Brent, et al. "From damage to discovery via virtual unwrapping: Reading the scroll from En-Gedi." Science advances 2.9 (2016): e1601247. (Web Article)
 
Segal, Michael, et al. "An Early Leviticus Scroll From En-Gedi: Preliminary Publication." Textus 26 (2016): 1-30. (PDF)

📺 EDUCE: Imaging the Herculaneum Scrolls | YouTube

Watched Imaging the Herculaneum Scrolls from YouTube
The eruption of Mt. Vesuvius covered the city of Herculaneum in twenty meters of lava, simultaneously destroying the Herculaneum scrolls through carbonization and preserving the scrolls by protecting them from the elements. Unwrapping the scrolls would damage them, but researchers are anxious to read the texts. Researchers from the University of Kentucky collaborated with the Institut de France and SkyScan to digitally unwrap and preserve the scrolls. To learn more about the EDUCE project, go to http://cs.uky.edu/dri.

They haven’t finished the last mile, but having high resolution scans of the objects is great. I’m not sure why they’re handling these items manually when they could very likely be secured in better external casings and still imaged the same way.

👓 Coca-Cola Urns | BEACH

Read Coca-Cola Urns (beachpackagingdesign.com)
Although the Han Dynasty urn on the left was originally fired sometime between 206 BC and 220 AD and the decorative “syrup urn” on the right was fired nearly 2000 years later, in the late 1800s or early 1900s, the two objects seem related, none-the-less.

👓 The Woman With Lapis Lazuli in Her Teeth | The Atlantic

Read Why a Medieval Woman Had Lapis Lazuli Hidden in Her Teeth (The Atlantic)
An analysis of dental plaque illuminates the forgotten history of female scribes.

📑 The grand sweep of Literature and History | Indie Digital Media

Annotated The grand sweep of Literature and History by Richard MacManus (Indie Digital Media)
“I’m always genuinely happy to interact with listeners,” [Doug Metzger, Ph.D.] said, “and since some prefer social media, I use it. But my (thus far only modestly effective) strategy has been to try and produce enduring content and let it speak for itself, rather than posting ephemera on Facebook and Twitter at regular intervals.”  

I love his use of the word “ephemera” in relation to social media, particularly as he references his podcast about ancient history.

🔖 Khirbet Qeiyafa Archaeological Project

Bookmarked Khirbet Qeiyafa Archaeological Project (qeiyafa.huji.ac.il)
Excavation directors:   Prof. Yosef Garfinkel (Hebrew University)
Mr. Saar Ganor (Israel Antiquities Authority)
Institution   The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Location:   Israel, 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem
Periods:   Iron Age, early 10th century BC; Hellenistic
Nearest village:   Kibbutz Netiv Ha-Lamed Hei

The fieldwork lasted from 2007 to 2013. Now the expedition concentrates on the analysis of the finds and writing the final excavation reports. A new field project is starting at Tel Lachish, cooperation between the Institute of Archaeology of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Institute of Archaeology of Southern Adventist University.

📖 Read pages 75-102 of In the Footsteps of King David: Revelations from an Ancient Biblical City by Yosef Garfinkel, Saar Ganor, and Michael G. Hasel

📖 Read pages 75-102 of Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David in In the Footsteps of King David: Revelations from an Ancient Biblical City by Yosef Garfinkel, Saar Ganor, and Michael G. Hasel (Thames & Hudson, 1st edition; July 24, 2018)

Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia

Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David

Ancient cities of the biblical period did not include public areas comparable to the central forum in Roman cities, the piazza in medieval European cities, or the shopping malls of modern cities. Instead, the gate area was the heart of the city, as everyone who entered or left the city had to pass through it.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 75-76

The city gate was where elders of the town sat and passed judgment on disputes brought before them.

Importance of the city gates

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 77

Movement through this inner gate could have been controlled, so that possibly not everyone who was allowed into the piazza could then proceed further into the city.

I’m reminded of theater design in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in which lobbies are meant to physically hold everyone in a public space before they’re let into the actual theater space inside.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 77

Tabun is an Arabic term referring to round overns used for baking, measuring around 0.5-1m (1 1/2-3 1/4 ft) in diameter and generally constructed of earth, though occasionally from a circle of rounded stones.

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 78

…four large stone steps (a rare find in itself, as built stone steps are seldom uncovered in excavations) descended into the main room.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 79

To the best of our knowledge, drainage channels have not been reported in ordinary dwellings in biblical period cities–only in the city gates–so this came as a surprise.

“To the best of our knowledge” –I like the warning/caution they give here, though most may gloss over it. Small statements like this are small flags in the text that scholars should note for potential future research. Subtle flags like this pop up in math textbooks frequently, but often only the well-trained know to take advantage of them.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 79

This demonstrates how the understanding of archaeological remains can change as an excavation progresses.

Another archaeology 101 example here. Keep in mind that something that may look one way at a point in the research may change fundamentally as one “digs” further.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 80

A bench stood next to the entrance–a feature found only in cultic rooms.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 82

…which we interpreted as a stable.

again another cautionary flag that might possibly take other interpretations.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 82

One room (G) is unusual: it contained a bench…

G doesn’t seem to actually be labeled on diagram C3, but does appear on Fig. 28 of building C10

Highlight (gray) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 82

Pillared buildings are well known from the period of the kingdoms of Judah and Israel and were used as public storehouses for the produce collected as tax from farmers. The existence of such a building at Khirbet Qeiyafa clearly indicates central authority and administration.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 85

We know that in ancient times urgent messages were communicated over great distances by sending signals using fire or torches. Evidence of this practice in the Kingdom of Judah comes from an inscription on a pottery sherd from Lachish from the time when Nebuchadnezzar was besieging the city: “we are watching for the fire signals of Lachish according to all the signs which my lord has given. The palace at Khirbet Qeiyafa would ahve been an ideal place for sending and receiving such torch-signals.

Nice documentation in the archaeological record for early long distance communication

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 86, 88

…we can three phases of development in cities in Judah in the biblical period (Fig. 33).

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 89

Khirbet Qeiyafa was probably the first site constructed according to this plan. [urban planning in Israel involving a casemate wall with houses that incorporate the casemates as rooms. Several examples from the following centuries exist using a similar pattern.]

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 91

The excavations at Khirbet Qeiyafa thus reveal another important aspect of the historical figure of David, and show that not only did he build cities, but also that a new concept of urban planning emerged during his reign.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 91

… the city was built in several major phases. In the first phase, the site was cleared of earlier settlement remains and bedrock was exposed around the future city. In the second phase, stones were quarried and brought up to the line of the city wall. […] In the third pahse, the builders began work on the gates and their chambers. […] Construction of the wall itself commenced in the fourth phase. […] In the fifth and final phase, the private houses whose walls incorporated the casemates were constructed.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 92

This was a good demonstration that the chronological dilemma cannot be resolved on the basis of pottery alone.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 93

In the 2008 season we had discovered carbonized olive pits in the city wall and in rooms of the destroyed buildings in Area B.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 93

The enormous tension that accompanied sending the samples via express mail resulted in the credit card with which we paid for the shipment being mistakenly packed inisde and sent to the laboratory at Oxford, along with the olive pits.

This could be a great plot point in a thriller version of this story!
One might think that with multiple samples, they might send them separately, that way if some are lost, then at least they’ve not lost everything!

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 94

A discovery made in our 2011 excavation season […] A jar containing some 20 olive pits was found in the destroyed city. […] which clearly indicate that the city had been destroyed no later than 980 to 970 BCE. […} Today, the dating […] is based on nearly 30 samples, probably the best radiometric dating we have so far for any level in a biblical city.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 95

…determining the dates of the reigns of the kings of Israel and Judah is not a simple task, and the length of those of David and Solomon, exactly 40 years each, appears to be a literary device rather than reflecting historical reality. We therefore propose that the round number of 1000 BCE as the date of David’s accession to the through, though this is merely an approximation. […] But it is clear from the radiocarbon determinations that Khirbet Qeiyafa can be dated to the time of David or Saul, but no to Solomon’s reign, which is later than the results obtained. It will only be possible to decide conclusively if an inscription naming one king or another is found at Khirbet Qeiyafa. To be scientifically cautious, we accept the later date, to the reign of King David.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 95

The “excavation dump” is the term commonly used by archaeologists in referring to the piles of earth and stones that they remove from the ground during excavation.

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 97

In 2007 it was possible to claim that nothing was known archaeologically about King David; ten years later the situation is very different, and archaeology can present two sites from his period in the Judean Shephelah.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 3: Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Period of King David > Page 101
Guide to highlight colors

Yellow–general highlights and highlights which don’t fit under another category below
Orange–Vocabulary word; interesting and/or rare word
Green–Reference to read
Blue–Interesting Quote
Gray–Typography Problem
Red–Example to work through

📖 Read pages 1-52 of In the Footsteps of King David: Revelations from an Ancient Biblical City by Yosef Garfinkel, Saar Ganor, and Michael G. Hasel

📖 Read pages 1-52 of Preface; Chapter 1: The Curtain Rises on the Sorek and Elah Valleys; and Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology In the Footsteps of King David: Revelations from an Ancient Biblical City by Yosef Garfinkel, Saar Ganor, and Michael G. Hasel (Thames & Hudson, 1st edition; July 24, 2018)

So far a fascinating account of a multi-season excavation of a late 11th and early 10th centuries BCE city. They do an excellent job of teasing out of the biblical, mythical, and archaeological sources for setting the story of their work. They also lay out several alternate and competing contemporary theories surrounding their work.

For those who haven’t studied archaeology, they also do a great job of discussing the evolution of the topic and its application to their particular example, so you not only get the particular story they’re telling, but also a relatively firm framework for how archaeology is practiced in a modern setting.

This is a great example of science and humanities communication. I can’t wait to finish out the book.

Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia

Chapter 1: The Curtain Rises on the Sorek and Elah Valleys

The second tradition relating to the Sorek Valley tells of the Ark of the Covenant…

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 1: The Curtain Rises on the Sorek and Elah Valleys > Page 16

Traditions connected to the Elah Valley are preserved in the books of Samuel and Chronicles, which relate to Iron Age IIA.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 1: The Curtain Rises on the Sorek and Elah ValleysK > Page 16

Khirbet Qeiyafa is […] situated on the border between Judah and Philistia, […] The question then arises if and how the excavation at Khirbet Qeiyafa contributes to our understanding of this tradition [of David and Goliath].

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 1: The Curtain Rises on the Sorek and Elah Valleys > Page 17

Hidden in the biblical story of the battle between David and Goliath is valuable geographical-historical information. […] Goliath the Gittite (from the city of Gath) […] Gath was destroyed at the end of the 9th century BCE by Hazael, the Aramean king of Damascus, and Ekron was destroyed in 603 BCE by the Babylonians. […] It is thus clear that the biblical author had access to historical information originating in the 10th and 9th centuries BCE.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 1: The Curtain Rises on the Sorek and Elah Valleys > Page 18

However, the Elah Valley was an area of border conflicts only in the 10th and 9th centuries BCE, and after the destruction of Gath entirely lost its earlier geopolitical significance.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 1: The Curtain Rises on the Sorek and Elah Valleys > Page 20
Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology
Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 22

I’m curious about the insignia pictured on David’s right shoulder. Does it mean something specific or is it simply decoration?

No other person is mentioned more frequently throughout the Old and New Testaments [than King David]…

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 24

David began his reign around 1000 BCE in Hebron, where he remained for 7 years before conquering Jerusalem and establishing it as his capital. Solomon succeeded him in c. 970 or 960 BCE. […] According to the Old Testament, following Solomon’s death the kingdom split into two separate political units: the Kingdom of Israel in the north , with its capital at Samaria, and the Kingdom of Judah in the south, centered on Jerusalem. The northern kingdom was destroyed by the Assyrians after several waves of military campaigns which resulted in the final destruction of Samaria in 722 BCE. The Kingdom of Judah was destroyed by the Babylonians after a series of invasions, which culminated in the destruction of Jerusalem and the First Temple in 586 BCE.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 25

This was demonstrated on July 21, 1993, when the fragmentary Tel Dan stela was discovered in northern Israel. On it was carved an inscription, written in Aramaic, which refers to a battle and the subsequent defeat of the king of Israel and the king of the “House of David” at the hands of Hazael of Damascus.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 27

Subsequent studies have shown that the same phrase, “House of David,” also appears on the Mesha inscription from ancient Moab.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 28

…Jerusalem is a particularly difficult city for archaeological research for three main reasons. First, the modern city covers nearly all of [it]… Secondly, the nature of construction on such a hilly site meant that in many periods builders removed all previous structures when creating new ones and built directly upon bedrock, so that remains of buildings of certain periods are entirely absent. and thirdly, during the First Temple period of life in the city extended uninterrupted over a 400-year period until the Babylonian destruction, and buildings therefore remained in continuous use for a considerable time.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 29

…several large architectural structures have been uncovered in Jerusalem [including] the “Stepped Stone Structure” [uncovered] as early as 1923-25 [in] an expedition headed by archaeologists R.A.S. Macalister and John G. Duncan exposed a portion of this impressive structure.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 29

The date of these three monumental buildings in Jerusalem is very problematic, as they are not associated with settlement strata rich in the pottery finds that can enable the archaeologist to determine their time of use, and no organic finds appropriate for radiocarbon dating were discovered.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 30

One proposal [for the chronology of the monarchy in Judah], known as the low chronology, maintains that urbanization, i.e., the transition from a rural society (the periods of the Settlement and Judges: iron Age I) to an urban society (the period of the monarchy: Iron Age II) occurred only at th end of the 10th century BCE, and only in the north, in the Kingdom of Israel. In this scenario, David must be regarded as a local tribal chief at most.

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 30

Tells consist of layers of settlement largely superimposed one upon the other […], so that it is often necessary to uncover finds from later periods first, in order to reach the earlier ones below, a time-consuming and costly undertaking.

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 31

Since archaeological techniques were then in their infancy, the methodologies used were often lacking in precision, and early excavators did not correctly differentiate between the various strata and attributed finds from different periods to the same one.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 31

Alongside the large, stratified archaeological tell sites are so-called ruins (Arabic, knirbah; Hewbrew, horvah). Such sites were settled for limited periods of time and did not develop into deep, multi-layered tells.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 32

Thus, for example, at Khirbet Qeiyafa we exposed 5,000 sq. m (54,000 sq. ft) or around 25 per cent of the settlement in seven seasons of excavation.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 32

Interpreting the various finds from an excavation, such as pottery, stone vessels, metal tools, figurines, jewelry, and coins requires care: those from a particular layer of occupation reflect mainly the final phase of habitation in that layer–in other words, the final days, a moment before the destruction or abandonment of a settlement. But what if a settlement was established a hundred or two hundred years prior to the destruction? How can we ascertain that? This is a difficult problem and the result is that many excavators erroneously tend to compress periods of tens or hundreds of years into brief periods of a few years.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 32

As a result, surveys will fail to identify the latter’s existence and a distorted picture of a “gap in settlement” will result; in other words, the surveyor will falsely conclude that during a certain period there was no settlement at a given site.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 33

I’m enjoying the archaeological background that they describe in their extended example within the book. This book could almost be described as Archaeology 101: An applied example using an exploration of Khirbet Qeiyafa.

The conclusion based on such surveys that there were no settlements in Judah during the 10th century BCE and that a centralized kingdom did not exist at the time is therefore essentially flawed.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 34

We must also remember that the dynamic hypotheses of identifying various sources, redactors, and editors of the biblical text are “constructions of modern scholarship” and that they continue to evolve and change.
One must accept, then, that modern scholarship has no clear and objective tool for dealing with the dating of the writing of the different biblical traditions. In the current stat of our knowledge, with the evidence available, the process of formation and transmission of the texts remains unresolved, as does the time and manner in which they took on their present form.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 36

Perhaps information theory could be applied here to better tease out these questions?

According to the minimalist method [using Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar to study history] , two main conclusions may be drawn from this: first, that the Roman Empire should be dated to the 16th Century, and second that Julius Caesar is a purely literary character–both of which are patently absurd.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 37

The weakest link in archaeological research […] is frequently the lengthy time that elapses between excavation and publication of the results. Archaeological excavation destroys what it excavates. It is therefore a scholarly and scientific obligation to publish all of the data on the excavation procedure and the findings for other scholars and the public at large.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 40

In our view, archaeology finds should be independently dates; only then may attempts be made to connect them with historical/biblical figures, periods, or events.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 41

This is the first site in Judah from the beginning of the monarchy to be dated using this scientific technique [radiocarbon dating]. The results unequivocally demonstrated that the city was established at the end of the 11th and the beginning of the 10th century BCE.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 42

Scholars who attempt to apply findings from northern sites to the situation in Judah and Jerusalem are committing a methodological error. […] we refrain from using the term “United Monarchy,” which implies the existence of akingdom that also included the north of the country. Instead, we shall use here the term “Kingdom of Judah.”

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 42

The data are like pieces of a mosaic that can be combined in different ways to form different images; the pieces themselves do not change, but the images they form can be modified. Here we briefly summarize five of the conflicting paradigms regarding David’s kingdom, and their development.
* The biblical paradigm […]
* The mythological paradigm […]
* The chronological paradigm […]
* The ethnic paradigm […]
* The Kingdom of Judah paradigm […]

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Pages 43-50

However the heavily fortified city of Khirbet Qeiyafa, with its planning and public spaces suggests a centralized urban social organization rather than a dispersed rural population.
We believe Khirbet Qeiyafa is a Judahite site for six main reasons, which we summarize briefly here […]

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 47

casemate wall [is] a wall built of two parallel walls with the space between them divided by perpendicular walls into long narrow rooms called casemates.

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 47

The term “Hebrew” is familiar from the Bible, where it is used to describe populations particularly during the Patriarchal period.

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 49

The term “Jew” entered into use only at the end of the First Temple period and appears primarily in the biblical books dealing with the Second Temple period. […] Therefore, in modern research it is customary to use this term only in describing populations from the Second Temple period onward.

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 49

To summarize: the mythological, chronological, and ethnic paradigms are in reality variations of the same minimalist approach.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 49

The original minimalist approach, as expressed in the mythological paradigm, was a consistent worldview that maintained that the history of ancient Israel should only be based on extra-biblical data. Both of the approaches that followed, the low chronology paradigm and the ethnic paradigm, were variations that attempted to solve questions that the previous paradigm could not answer.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 50

What about future possible paradigms?

ossuary [is] a small stone chest for holding the bones of a dead person

Highlight (orange) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 50

Christopher Rollston suggested therefore that there could be some connection between the Arabic name Khirbet Qeiyafa and the name of the family of priests, Caiaphas, known from the New Testament, and that perhaps the family had a rural estate in the area of the Elah Valley, a memory of which is preserved in the Arabic name of our site.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Pages 50-51

[…] in the Elah valley […] the soil is not terra rossa but rather a type known as rendzina.

Highlight (yellow) – Chapter 2: In King David’s Footsteps: Bible, History, and Archaeology > Page 51
Guide to highlight colors

Yellow–general highlights and highlights which don’t fit under another category below
Orange–Vocabulary word; interesting and/or rare word
Green–Reference to read
Blue–Interesting Quote
Gray–Typography Problem
Red–Example to work through

Acquired In the Footsteps of King David: Revelations from an Ancient Biblical City by Yosef Garfinkel, Saar Ganor, Michael G. Hasel

Acquired In the Footsteps of King David: Revelations from an Ancient Biblical City by Yosef Garfinkel, Saar Ganor, Michael G. Hasel (Thames & Hudson; 1 edition)

The remarkable excavation of a previously unidentified city in Israel from the time of King David, shedding new light on the link between the bible and history

King David is a pivotal figure in the Bible, which tells his life story in detail and gives stirring accounts of his deeds, including the slaying of the Philistine giant Goliath and the founding of his capital in Jerusalem. But no certain archaeological finds from the period of his reign or of the kingdom he ruled over have ever been uncovered―until now.

In this groundbreaking account, the excavators of Khirbet Qeiyafa in the Valley of Elah, where the Bible says David fought Goliath, reveal how seven years of exhaustive investigation have uncovered a city dating to the time of David― the late eleventh and early tenth century BCE―surrounded by massive fortifications with impressive gates and a clear urban plan, as well as an abundance of finds that tell us much about the inhabitants. Discussing the link between the Bible, archaeology, and history In the Footsteps of King David explains the significance of these discoveries and how they shed new light on David’s kingdom. The topic is at the center of a controversy that has raged for decades, but these findings successfully challenge scholars disputing the historicity of the Bible and the chronology of the events recounted in it.

90+ illustrations

Purchased for $26.79 at Distant Land’s 30% discount/going out of business sale.

👓 Pompeii is still astounding us with secrets | Quartz

Read Pompeii is still astounding us with secrets by Kabir Chibber (Quartz)
The latest discovery: A depiction of a so-called enchanted garden filled with vivid, incredibly well-preserved frescoes of peacocks, serpents, and a dog-headed man.

👓 A Blended Family: Her Mother Was Neanderthal, Her Father Something Else Entirely | New York Times

Read A Blended Family: Her Mother Was Neanderthal, Her Father Something Else Entirely (nytimes.com)
Genetic analysis of bones discovered in a Siberian cave hints that the prehistoric world may have been filled with “hybrid” humans.

👓 Large Cache of Texts May Offer Insight Into One of Africa’s Oldest Written Languages | Smithsonian Magazine

Read Large Cache of Texts May Offer Insight Into One of Africa's Oldest Written Languages (Smithsonian)
Archaeologists in Sudan have uncovered the largest assemblage of Meroitic inscriptions to date

This is a cool discovery, in great part because their documentation was interesting enough to be able to suggest further locations to check for more archaeological finds. This might also be something one could apply some linguistic analysis and information theory to in an attempt to better pull apart the language and grammar.

h/t to @ArtsJournalNews, bookmarked on April 17, 2018 at 08:16AM