Read Neolithic carved balls could have been basis of the imperial measurement system (HeraldScotland)
I AM pleased that Jeff Nisbet has managed to do what I have tried in vain to do for the past two years which is to get media interest into what may well be the first examples of art in Scotland ("New theory sheds light on mysterious stone balls found across Scotland", The Herald, May 4) with the suggestion that the balls are, perhaps, apprenticeship pieces for entry into the profession of stone masonry.
Watched What's the meaning of Stonehenge? I Curator's corner season 4 episode 1 from YouTube
Neil Wilkin is back with another bronze age adventure. In this episode he is joined by Susan Greaney, Senior Properties Historian for English Heritage to discuss the history and importance of Stonehenge. Going into the heart of the monument and looking at some related bronze age objects Neil and Susan explore the connections between Stonehenge, the rest of Britain and the continent.
Watched How To Make A Carved Stone Ball | Stone Age Technology from YouTube
Discover more about 'Making Connections: Stonehenge in its Prehistoric World' an exhibition that runs from 12 October 2018 until 21 April 2019: http://bit.ly/2QRzFDb Watch James Dilley (@ancientcraftUK) as he recreates a Carved Stone Ball using the same techiniques and methods as stone workers from the late Neolithic era.
Read Prehistoric Petrosphere - Carved Stone Spheres and Balls (Joy of Museums Virtual Tours)
Prehistoric Petrosphere – Carved Stone Spheres and Balls Prehistoric Petrosphere – Carved Stone Balls are spherical human-made objects made from stone. These ancient artifacts have been created by carving by up to up to 5200 years ago. These carved stone balls dating from the Late Neolithic to as late as the Iron Age, are mainly […]

Plotting the find sites on a map shows that these petrospheres were often located in the vicinity of Neolithic recumbent stone circles. 

Annotated on July 24, 2020 at 03:06PM

They are usually round of reasonably uniform size at around 2.75 inches or 7 cm across. They can have from 3 to 160 protruding knob shapes on the surface. These carved stone balls are nearly all have been found in north-east Scotland, the majority in Aberdeenshire. As portable objects, they are straightforward to transport and have been found on Iona, Skye, Harris, Uist, Lewis, Arran, Hawick, Wigtownshire, and fifteen from Orkney. A similar distribution to that of Pictish symbols led to the early suggestion that carved stone balls are Pictish artifacts. However, examples have been found in Ireland and England. 

Annotated on July 24, 2020 at 03:27PM