Forget about blackout poetry, Google enables highlight poetry in your browser!

Kevin Marks literally and figuratively highlighted a bit of interesting found poetry on Google’s Ten things we know to be true article. (Click the link to see the highlight poetry on Google’s page for yourself.)

A screenshot appears below:

Screenshot of a Google Page with the words "Doing evil is a business. take advantage of all our users" disaggregated, but highlighted so as to reveal a message.
Found poetry:
“Doing evil
is a business
take advantage of
all our users”

Here’s a shortened URL for it that you can share with others: bit.ly/D-ntB-Evil

It’s a creative inverse of blackout poetry where instead of blacking out extraneous words, one can just highlight them instead. This comes courtesy of some new browser based functionality that Google announced earlier this week relating to some of their search and page snippets functionality.

You can find some code and descriptions for how to accomplish this in the WISC Scroll to Text Github repository.

What kind of poetry will you find online this week?

Read Homosalus by Waliya Yohanna Joseph (vispo.com)

Give your time to people.
Give your talent to people.
Give your treasure to people.
Shield your taste from people.
Shield your tongue from people.
Shield your temper from people.
Commit yourself to trust in people.
Commit yourself to truth in people.
Commit yourself to teaching people.
Then, your life must be successful.
Then, your life journey would be smooth.
Then, your life would be without sorrow.

Fascinating interactive poetry.
Read Paradox of Technology by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
Podcasting or bronze casting crafting  of your story should be rough draft of your glory Yet the paradox of technology lead to padlocks on the soapbox once artisic holitstic now undescriptive and stripped of synergistic differences search of prescriptive low friction design instead of the grind//...
Quite a nice little poem here. Almost rap-like with a soupcon of social media silo…
Replied to Testing Out IndieWeb With Poetry (The Daily Connector)
For this Connected Writing Activity — which is taking place rather randomly as a test of something new, so pardon the odd nature of the post — we are testing out Greg’s idea for IndieWeb syndication across blogs. He has a “sub” set up for poetry at IndieWeb, so let’s try that.
You’ve gotten soooo close, but missed by just a hair.

You’ve described the process properly, but in the link at the top of your site, you’ve written:

<a href="https://indieweb.xyz/en/indiewebpoetry” class=">/en/indiewebpoetry</a>

instead of

<a href="https://indieweb.xyz/en/indiewebpoetry” class="u-syndication">/en/indiewebpoetry</a>.

I think the other small portion you’re missing is that Indieweb.xyz works using the Webmention protocol. It doesn’t appear to me that your site is using the Webmention or the Semantic Linkbacks plugins to make that portion work. If you install and activate them, that will get you a bit further and your site will properly ping Indieweb.xyz when you publish your posts to it.

An alternate route, without those plugins, is to manually ping Indieweb.xyz directly. You can use this manual submission link which has instructions and the fields you’ll need to fill out to force a manual webmention.

Looking forward to seeing your poetry on /en/indiewebpoetry!

P.S.: I’m also seeing <pre><a rel="webmention" href="https://brid.gy/webmention/wordpress">-</a></pre> appearing in a widget in your right hand sidebar. I take this to mean that you’re trying to accept webmentions and that you’re using WordPress.com to host your site. I suspect you may not be getting the results you’re looking for on that account because the code is wrapped in <pre></pre>. If you remove that pre tag, you’ll be closer to getting that piece working. If it’s done properly you should only see the dash “-” in that widget. If you prefer to not have a random dash in your sidebar and since that link is only used/read by Brid.gy’s code parser, you can also hide it on your site by using the following code instead <link rel="webmention" href="https://brid.gy/webmention/wordpress">.

👓 Testing Out IndieWeb With Poetry | Daily Connector

Read Testing Out IndieWeb With Poetry (The Daily Connector)
This was also posted to /en/indiewebpoetry. For this Connected Writing Activity — which is taking place rather randomly as a test of something new, so pardon the odd nature of the post &#8212…

🔖 ❤️ OnlineCrsLady tweeted in his cryptography/blockchain talk for #Domains19 @poritzj mentioned steganography, so I wanted to share with him, plus with anyone interested in such weirdness, the Latin Steganometrographia for creating cryptographic poetry in Latin: cool, bizarre, fun! https://t.co/5JawIqhbQF https://t.co/jqnJPJZcwh

Bookmarked a tweet by Laura GibbsLaura Gibbs (Twitter)

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.


From Robert Frost, “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” from The Poetry of Robert Frost, edited by Edward Connery Lathem (1923)

I’ve been thinking lately about writing some poetry and putting it here on my site. Since the muses aren’t visiting today, I thought I would republish Frost’s poem today to to celebrate its entering the public domain. Perhaps I’ll think of a way to remix it too…

Featured photo credit: P1020911 flickr photo by pekka.jarvelainen shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC) license

Acquired Gmorning, Gnight!: Little Pep Talks for Me & You

Acquired Gmorning, Gnight!: Little Pep Talks for Me & You by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jonny Sun (Random House)

Before he inspired the world with Hamilton and was catapulted to international fame, Lin-Manuel Miranda was inspiring his Twitter followers with words of encouragement at the beginning and end of each day. He wrote these original sayings, aphorisms, and poetry for himself as much as for others. But as Miranda’s audience grew, these messages took on a life on their own. Now Miranda has gathered the best of his daily greetings into a beautiful collection illustrated by acclaimed artist (and fellow Twitter favorite) Jonny Sun. Full of comfort and motivation, Gmorning, Gnight! is a touchstone for anyone who needs a quick lift.

Gmorning, Gnight!

Received as a Christmas gift

👓 National Poetry Writing Month #NaPoWriMo: 3 Days In! | Silence and Voice

Read National Poetry Writing Month : 3 Days In! by Jeffrey KeeferJeffrey Keefer (Silence and Voice)
I have been successful with writing poems for the first two days of National Poetry Writing Month, the annual celebration of poetry writing that coincides with National Poetry Month each April. Since I have been writing poetry as one of my 2018 goals (the goal is specifically to publish a poem this year), I thought this was a wonderful opportunity to generate some first drafts of poems in a communal setting as others who are engaging in the same process are sharing their progress via the tag .
I’ve been considering that I ought to write more poetry. Perhaps NaPoWriMo would be the way to go?

👓 Gil Scott-Heron, Revolutionary Poet and Musician, Dead at 62 | Rolling Stone

Read Gil Scott-Heron, Revolutionary Poet and Musician, Dead at 62 by Andy Greene (Rolling Stone)
Scott-Heron was best known for 1970’s ‘The Revolution Will Not Be Televised’
I remembered reading about his passing several years back, but something this morning got some of his poetry, music, and writing stuck in the back of my head. Perhaps it was something about the revolution not being televised. In any case, what a creative soul we’ve lost…

👓 Robert Lowth | Wikipedia

Read Robert Lowth (Wikipedia)
Robert Lowth FRS (/laʊð/; 27 November 1710 – 3 November 1787) was a Bishop of the Church of England, Oxford Professor of Poetry and the author of one of the most influential textbooks of English grammar.
An interesting character with an outsize influence on modern English grammar. Dave Harris is sure to appreciate this.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

Lowth seems to have been the first modern Bible scholar to notice or draw attention to the poetic structure of the Psalms and much of the prophetic literature of the Old Testament.  

October 16, 2018 at 10:55AM

Lowth’s grammar is the source of many of the prescriptive shibboleths that are studied in schools,  

October 16, 2018 at 10:56AM

His most famous contribution to the study of grammar may have been his tentative suggestion that sentences ending with a preposition—such as “what did you ask for?”—are inappropriate in formal writing.  

October 16, 2018 at 10:56AM