👓 Robert Rauschenberg, Erased de Kooning Drawing, 1953 | SFMOMA

Read Robert Rauschenberg, Erased de Kooning Drawing, 1953 (SFMOMA)
From 1951 to 1953, Robert Rauschenberg made a number of artworks that explore the limits and very definition of art. These works recall and effectively extend the notion of the artist as creator of ideas, a concept first broached by Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968) with his iconic readymades of the early twentieth century. With Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), Rauschenberg set out to discover whether an artwork could be produced entirely through erasure—an act focused on the removal of marks rather than their accumulation.

I love the idea here of making art by removing things. It’s somewhat akin to removing stone in a block of marble to create a sculpture, but at the same time this is also different. I’m also reminded of the idea of a photo negative or the concept of publishing negative results in science to give us a fuller picture of an area. Translating this idea from art into broader life could be quite interesting.

Hat tip: graffiti story, body art

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Liked a post by AlonealastalovedalongtheAlonealastalovedalongthe (Toot Café)
All the hand painted signs I find disused in sheds and basements make me sad. I don't think the ability to print signs with computers and digital fonts actually made the world a better place. Definitely didn't make it more beautiful. Logos like the coca cola logo are static, dead imitations of beautiful handwritten scripts shoved in everyone's faces as a reminder of what once was a living, human pursuit rewarded by society.
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👓 graffiti story, body part  | Mastodon

Read graffiti story, body part  by Kate Kate (Mastodon)

In our town there’s a big wall. Recently a silver penis showed up there, at startling scale. Someone stood there and sprayed it into life, with anatomical detail.

Two weeks later and it’s been covered with a dense drizzle of more silver lines. Not roller painted, so not the council. A concerned citizen went to the hardware store and bought a matching can and scribbled it out, standing in the same spot.

What’s that word for making art by erasing art?

#smallstories

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📺 Elsku Stelpur (Dear Girls) | YouTube

Watched Elsku Stelpur (Dear Girls) from YouTube
"Elsku Stelpur" or "Dear Girls" was the winning performance by Hagaskóli in Skrekkur 2015, an annual Icelandic talent show between high schools in Reykjavík. The performance consists of contemporary dancing and feminist slam poetry in Icelandic, which I've subtitled in English so that more people can understand its powerful message, please enjoy.

A powerful piece. Possibly even more powerful watching it in a language that isn’t English.

👓 Goodbye PMCA | ColoradoBoulevard.net

Read Goodbye PMCA by Toti O'Brien (ColoradoBoulevard.net)
Chances are by the time you read this article, Pasadena Museum of California Arts (PMCA) has closed its doors for good (last day is scheduled for Sunday, October 7th, 2018)
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👓 Virginia Museum Does What Pasadena Museum Won’t: Gives Back Nazi-Looted Artwork to Heir of Owner | Pasadena Now

Read Virginia Museum Does What Pasadena Museum Won’t: Gives Back Nazi-Looted Artwork to Heir of Owner (pasadenanow.com)
In contrast to the decades-long court battle fought by a Pasadena museum with the heir of an art dealer to keep a pair of $24 million, 400-year-old paintings which had been seized by a Nazi leader during World War II, the Virginia Museum of Fine Art Board voted last week to return a valuable painting it had acquired under similar circumstances. The masterpieces in both cases had been taken in forced sales from Amsterdam art dealer Jacques Goudstikker in 1940 by Hermann Göring, Hitler’s henchman who created the Gestapo, the feared Nazi secret police.
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Glenn Zucman's Business Cards

Over the weekend, I attended WordCamp Los Angeles and ran into my friend and fellow educator Glenn Zucman. Though I suspect we both know where to find each other (online via our many websites), we traded business cards and chatted about business cards and art for a bit.

Because Glenn is such a creative genius, I wanted to take a moment to share his brilliant business card idea which I loved. Since he does some painting in his work, he’s using variously colored paint chips (choose your favorite color, natch) as business cards over which he’s using a stamp and ink to add on his contact details. What a great mixed-media idea using “found art” for an artists’ business cards.

What I loved even more is that he not only found some nice sized paint chips, which are about twice the size of a typical business card, but he found chips for a paint brand which he actually likes and endorses.

Glenn Zucman business card front
Glenn Zucman business card verso

🎧 Analysis, Parapraxis, Elvis, Season 3 Episode 10 | Revisionist History

Listened to Analysis, Parapraxis, Elvis, Season 3 Episode 10 by Malcolm Gladwell from Revisionist History

"The one song The King couldn’t sing."

Elvis Presley returned from his years in the army to record one of his biggest hits, “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” But he could never quite get the lyrics right. Why? Revisionist History puts the King of Rock and Roll on the couch.

I expected Gladwell to circle back around to the opening song about beating the dog, but he left us hanging…

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👓 How David Lynch Got Creative Inspiration? By Drinking a Milkshake at Bob’s Big Boy, Every Single Day, for Seven Straight Years | Open Culture

Read How David Lynch Got Creative Inspiration? By Drinking a Milkshake at Bob’s Big Boy, Every Single Day, for Seven Straight Years (Open Culture)
"It is no secret that David Lynch, the writer-director-composer-painter, has an unusual relationship with Bob's Big Boy," begins a 1999 Los Angeles Times article on the auteur of films like Eraserhead and Blue Velvet. "For seven years in the 1980s he ate lunch there every day, ordering cup after cup of over-sweetened coffee and a single chocolate milkshake while scribbling notes on Bob's little square napkins." He took pains, notes reporter Amy Wallace, "to arrive at Bob's at precisely 2:30 p.m. each day. The reason: It increased the odds that he would encounter perfection."
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👓 The Artwork Was Rejected. Then Banksy Put His Name to It. | The New York Times

Read The Artwork Was Rejected. Then Banksy Put His Name to It. by Alex Marshall (nytimes.com)
The Royal Academy in London turned down a work by “Bryan S. Gaakman” for an exhibition, then asked Banksy — who had made it — if he had a submission.

This reminds me a bit of episode one of Revisionist History, though the way it is presented is much more cutsey with a soupcon of aw-shucks. They really should do more blind screening of artwork the way that orchestras in the US are typically doing blind auditions these days.

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🎧 Season 2 Episode 4 The Foot Soldier of Birmingham | Revisionist History

Listened to Revisionist History Season 2 Episode 4 The Foot Soldier of Birmingham by Malcolm GladwellMalcolm Gladwell from Revisionist History

Birmingham, 1963. The image of a police dog viciously attacking a young black protester shocks the nation. The picture, taken in the midst of one of Martin Luther King Jr.’s most famous marches, might be the most iconic photograph of the civil rights movement. But few have ever bothered to ask the people in the famous photograph what they think happened that day. It’s more complicated than it looks.



S2e4 content
CREDIT - Bill Hudson, AP
S2e4 content 2
“The Foot Soldier” by Ronald S. McDowell

What a stunning and unexpected story. I do so love this podcast.

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👓 Neanderthals produced symbolic art, research suggests | Cosmos Magazine

Read Neanderthals produced symbolic art, research suggests (Cosmos Magazine)
Grooves on an ancient piece of flint might have been made intentionally to encode information. Andrew Masterson reports.

An interesting synopsis though I suspect the paper is far more detailed.

h/t to @CosmosMagazine


bookmarked on May 03, 2018 at 09:03PM

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