Read The fight to preserve a 44,000-year-old painting by Krithika Varagur (1843)
One of the world’s oldest artworks has been discovered inside a working Indonesian mine. It survived this long – Krithika Varagur ventures to Sulawesi to find out if it has a future

This painting was discovered in the Bulu Sipong cave on Sulawesi in 2016 and recent analysis has shown that it is the “oldest pictorial record of storytelling” and the “earliest figurative artwork in the world”, and is at least 43,900 years old. (The oldest known drawing in the world, a 73,000-year-old abstract scribble, was found in South Africa in 2018.)

Annotated on March 06, 2020 at 10:25PM

Watched Beethoven “Moonlight Sonata” for Old Elephant by Paul BartonPaul Barton from YouTube

Mongkol is a 61-year-old former logging elephant. His captive-held life was spent hauling trees in the Thai forest. His body shape is deformed through hard labor, he lost his right eye and tusk in this brutal logging practice. Mongkol was rescued and brought to Elephants World to spend the rest of his days relaxing peacefully in freedom by the River Kwai. I discovered Mongkol is an extremely gentle, sensitive elephant who enjoys music, especially this slow movement by Beethoven which I play to him occasionally in the day and night.

You half expect the elephant to do something, but really the entire point is the quiet peacefulness.

Doc Searls retweet of Charles Johnson’s post ()

Read Required Reading by Hrag Vartanian (Hyperallergic)
Banksy got into the Valentine’s Day spirit and released an image of his newest piece in Bristol on Friday (Valentine’s Day). He posted about the new wall piece on his Instagram account (via @banksy)The Oscar-winning short animation flick is available on YouTube. Called “Hair Love,” it’s by...
Read - Finished Reading: How Saint George’s Dragon Got Its Wings (JSTOR Daily)
The lack of living dragons has never stopped people from drawing them. The trends for dragon design tend to organize along East-West lines: dragons in Asia are snakelike, wingless and benevolent, while European dragons are menacing winged lizards. When an artist situated right between Asia and Europ...
Read The Moral Deformity of Team Trump by Jim Andrews (vispo.com)
Images made with/by Aleph Null 3.0. Donald Trump, his cabinet, his main advisors, and a few Republicans incinemated. 231 images of these bandits mixed randomly together. Steve Bannon, Mike Pence, Steve Mnuchin, Myron Ebell, James Mattis, Mike Flynn, Jeff Sessions, Ryan Zinke, Wilbur Ross, Tom Price, Ben Carson, Elaine Chao, Rick Perry, Betsy Devos, Scott Pruitt, Kellyanne Conway, Hope Hicks, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Invanka Trump, Jared Kushner, James Woolsey, Newt Gingrinch, Mitch McConnell.
A fascinating little art project.
Read The ABC of City Planning (chpcny.org)
In 1937, Mayor La Guardia’s Committee on City Planning produced a small book for children, titled The ABC of City Planning, intended to instill understanding and enthusiasm in children for the city’s built environment. CHPC has preserved a copy of this adorable text, which for modern audiences is more than just an amusing diversion: it offers a unique insight into a New York City of a different era.

Liked "DANCE!" (2016), Pasha CAS (Temirtau, Kazakhstan) by Pasha CASPasha CAS (https://vk.com/pashacaskz)

"DANCE" (1910), Henri Matisse (Hermitage, St. Petersburg)
"DANCE!" (2016), Pasha CAS (Temirtau, Kazakhstan)

One of the most significant paintings in Matisse's work is “Dance”, which he created between 1908-1913. impressed by ritual, mystical and probably even idolatrous dances. The energy of the picture is conveyed in 3 colors: blue, green and red. With them, the artist merges the state of nature, rhythm, actions and people that appear before us naked and liberated, completely merging and at the same time clearly standing out from the general background.

And now, a little more than a century passes, and there is a new artist who wants to peek at modern round dance of megalopolises - through the prism of a new reality. Looking at the modern “Dance” we find that the idol has ceased to be something deified, it is so tangible and real that it even has its own outlines and outlines in the form of corporations and the fact that they spew out of themselves, drugging and enslaving people in shirts and tie, as in shackles. The all-consuming illusion of satiety, demonstrating the power of those who sit "on the pipe" over those who dance around it. Monster corporations ready to suck and sell oil - paint new interiors. Desperately dancing around the pipe!

PS
The city of Temirtau. Metallurgical plants etch everything living on the vine: not so long ago, environmentalists took a sample of the earth at five playgrounds and it was found that lead was exceeded 5 times higher than normal! Everyone is silent!

Author: street art artist Pasha CAS
Curator: Rush X
Text: Vita Pravda
Photo: Olya Koto
April 2016

http://pashacas.ru/2016/04/tanec-1910-anri-matiss-ermitazh-sankt-peterburg-plyashem-2016-pasha-kas-g-temirtau-kazaxstan/

(Rough translation from Russian)

Liked April memories by Olya KotoOlya Koto (vk.com/koto_olya)

The other day I’m eating in a trolley bus, in a backpack are paint cans and a bright sweater. It is drizzling outside the window - such is St. Petersburg spring! It's time for the opening of the season. The sun has already hatched somewhere, behind me is the Nevskaya Guba, and under my feet there are coils that replace the stepladder. Again, I dare to draw!

Many thanks to the space of sevcableport, for the kindly provided place for creativity!

Pink cat and reels, April 2018

#CotoOlya #PortSevcable

spray paint canswoman in orange coat spraypaints a large pink cat onto a wallWoman in pink sweater dancing in front of a large pink spraypainted cat on a wallclose up of one of the spools which has spraypainted pink and black lines coming off of it to look like the spools material is snaking across the ground.

View of industrial area with a pink cat spraypainted on a wall with large wooden spools of wire in front so as to indicate that the cat may be playing with their string
Via: @wakest via: @liaizon
Listened to Episode 5: Caring What You're Sharing by Dr Laurie SantosDr Laurie Santos from The Happiness Lab

Sharing a good experience with another human deepens our enjoyment of the moment... but only if we abide by certain rules. Dr Laurie Santos shows us how we often get 'sharing' wrong and explains how we can all derive more happiness from ice cream, sunsets and a night in front of the TV.

Maryellis Bunn’s website

Erica Boothby website

Museum of Ice Cream website

Alix Barash website

There is some interesting discussion about exploring and interacting with the world here both with and without a camera and/or digital phone or other device in one’s hand. 

The research and examples in this episode could be useful  for UX/UI  designers in the social media and IndieWeb spaces. The ideas presented here could help us in designing interactions on the web for people in a much happier and healthier fashion. I particularly likes the concept that a museum specifically redesigned some of it’s exhibits so as to be able to minimize the use of phones and increase the human-to-human interaction.

The questions of whether we’re posting content for ourselves or to share with others is an intriguing one. I tend to post for myself (and my memory via my commonplace book) first in almost all cases. When I’m taking photos or checking in, I almost always do it in a way so as to minimize as much as possible the distraction of doing so to others. It’s exceptionally rare that I spend the time and effort to get the “perfect” photo when I’m with others in public.

The discussion about the museum experience being designed for or against photography and the research relating to memories of the experiences reminds a lot of Matt Maldre’s recent experience with a museum security guard who urged patrons to get their phones out and take close up photos of artworks. [#] She obviously intuitively knew something that the rest of us could have only guessed at. Or perhaps she’s just been reading all the most cutting-edge research and putting it into practice in her own work?

This also reminds me I ought to call Dan Cohen and have a conversation about these sort of design concepts (and particularly those relating to Frances Yates and memory techniques) for his forthcoming library.

Read Fun security guards at art museums by Matt Maldre (Spudart)
Ever come across a fun or interesting security guard at an art museum? Here’s my encounter with a security guard at the Art Institute of Chicago sharing her love of tiny details of paintings, encouraging visitors to get closer to the artworks. After spending about ten minutes with a post-impressionist painting, over to the right …
I’ve always thought it would be kind of cool to be a museum security guard… Punking visitors might not have occurred to me, though this sounds so much more legit.
Read Whenever you see a Xerox machine in a public place, xerox your face by Matt Maldre (Spudart)
I have a long-standing goal of whenever I see a xerox machine in a public place, to scan my face. My wife and I did one on our honeymoon in France. The copy machine was tucked away in the back of a Monoprix supermarket in Avignon while we were picking up some food storage containers. …
Read Thoughts about xeroxing your face by Matt Maldre (Spudart)
A few days ago I xeroxed my face on our copier at work. The scanning bed was left open, and was just begging for something fun to be done. The copier machine at Tribune Content Agency and Chicago Magazine I did one copy of my face, then I grabbed a coworker and we each did …
I love the idea of this. Since the 80’s are having a resurgence in throw-back theme parties, people should definitely rent Xerox machines to practice this lost art form.

Practicing this with kids is an even more fun idea.

Where’d I put my Xerox machine???

Read Grand Guignol (Wikipedia)
Le Théâtre du Grand-Guignol (French pronunciation: ​[ɡʁɑ̃ ɡiɲɔl]: "The Theatre of the Great Puppet") – known as the Grand Guignol – was a theatre in the Pigalle district of Paris (at 20 bis, rue Chaptal [fr]). From its opening in 1897 until its closing in 1962, it specialised in naturalistic horror shows. Its name is often used as a general term for graphic, amoral horror entertainment, a genre popular from Elizabethan and Jacobean theatre (for instance Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, and Webster's The Duchess of Malfi and The White Devil), to today's splatter films.

Audiences had strong reactions to the new disturbing themes the horror plays presented. One of the most prevalent themes staged at the Grand-Guignol was the demoralization and corruption of science. The “evil doctor” was a reoccurring trope in the horror shows performed.

Development idea: Bring back the Grand Guignol, but have evil politicians instead.
Annotated on January 20, 2020 at 04:06PM