👓 GDPR will pop the adtech bubble | Doc Searls

Read GDPR will pop the adtech bubble by Doc SearlsDoc Searls (Doc Searls Weblog)

Since tracking people took off in the late ’00s, adtech has grown to become a four-dimensional shell game played by hundreds (or, if you include martech, thousands) of companies, none of which can see the whole mess, or can control the fraud, malware and other forms of bad acting that thrive in the midst of it.

And that’s on top of the main problem: tracking people without their knowledge, approval or a court order is just flat-out wrong. The fact that it can be done is no excuse. Nor is the monstrous sum of money made by it.

Without adtech, the EU’s GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) would never have happened. But the GDPR did happen, and as a result websites all over the world are suddenly posting notices about their changed privacy policies, use of cookies, and opt-in choices for “relevant” or “interest-based” (translation: tracking-based) advertising. Email lists are doing the same kinds of things.

Some interesting thought and analysis here on the pending death of adtech with the dawn of GDPR in the EU. I’m hoping that this might help bring about a more humanistic internet as a result.

There’s a lot to unpack here, but it looks like some tremendously valuable links and resources embedded in this article as well. I’ll have to circle back around to both re-read this and delve more deeply in to these pointers.

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🎧 Gillmor Gang 05.13.17: Doc Soup | Tech Crunch

Listened Gillmor Gang: Doc Soup by Steve Gillmor, Doc Searls, Keith Teare, Frank Radice from TechCrunch

Recorded live Saturday, May 13, 2017. The Gang takes nothing off the table as Doc describes a near future of personal APIs and CustomerTech.

Keith outlines an excellent thesis about media moving from “one to many” to increasingly becoming “one to one”. It points out the issue for areas like journalism, which can become so individualized, and democracy which often rely on being able to see the messages that are given out to the masses being consistent. One of the issues with Facebook and the Cambridge Analytica problem is that many people were getting algrorithmic customized messages (true or not) that had the ability to nudge them in certain directions. This creates a lot more control on the part of major corporations which would have been far less likely when broadcasting the exact same message to millions. In the latter case, the message for the masses can be discussed, analyzed, picked apart, and dealt with because it is known. In the former case, no one knows what the message was except for the person who received it and it’s far less likely that they analyzed and discussed it in the same way that it would have been previously.

In the last portion of the show, Doc leads with some discussion about identity and privacy from the buyer’s perspective. Companies selling widgets don’t necessarily need to collect massive amounts of data about us to sell widgets. It’s the seller’s perspective and the over-reliance on advertising which has created the capitalism surveillance state we’re sadly living within now.

In the closing minutes of the show Steve re-iterated that the show was a podcast, but that it’s now all about streaming and as such, there is no longer an audio podcast version of the show. I’ll have something to say about this shortly for those looking for alternatives, because this just drives me crazy…

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🎧 This Week in Tech 652 We’re All Out of Kidneys | TWiT.TV

Listened This Week in Tech 652 We're All Out of Kidneys by Leo Laporte, Ashley Esqueda, Mike Elgan, Sam Machkovech from TWiT.tv
Dot-com superb ads, Apple growth, Bezos’s big plan, and more. Tech ads in the Superbowl. Elon Musk's "Not-a-Flamethrower." Apple, Google, and Amazon quarterly results. What are Amazon's health plans? What game company will Microsoft buy next?

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👓 Aram Zucker-Scharff named Ad Engineering Director for RED | The Washington Post

Read Aram Zucker-Scharff named Ad Engineering Director for RED (Washington Post)
He will be focused on developing and launching new ad products that will be offered to clients on and off The Washington Post.
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❤️ Bitcoin propaganda posters in Brighton | Jeremy Keith

Liked Bitcoin propaganda posters in Brighton. by Jeremy Keith (adactio.com)

Bitcoin posters in Brighton

I love the overall advertising concept here–particularly for such a modern product.

I’m almost half-tempted to commission someone to re-purpose old war propaganda posters like this to promote the Indieweb movement.

He controls his own website–and they love that.

Don’t let that shadow touch them. Own your domain.

She may be… accepting Webmentions.

INDIEWEB

First they ignore you.

Then they laugh at you.

Then they fight you.

Then you WIN

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