Read Birds of North America: A guide to field Identification by Chandler S. Robbins, Bertel Bruun , Herbert S. Zim, Arthur Singer (Illustrator) (Golden Field Guides from St. Martin's Press)

Spot the silhouette of a Northern Goshawk in flight. Identify the raucous call of the Red-winged Blackbird. Discover the secret of picking out a Chipping Sparrow from its look-alike cousins. It's simple with this classic field guide, a treasured favorite among amateur bird lovers and exacting professionals. Recognized as the authority on bird identification, this invaluable resource provides:

-All of North America in one volume
-Over 800 species and 600 range maps
-Arthur Singer's famous illustrations featuring male, female, and juvenile plumage
-Sonograms that picture sound for easy song recognition
-Migration routes, feeding habits, and characteristic flight patterns
-American ornithologists' classifications
-Convenient check boxes to record birds you have identified
-Color tabs for quick references

Read introductory pages 1-17.

This seems to have most North American birds with good layouts, information, sonograms, and ranges. Could be a solid contender and is a nice size.

Read Peterson First Guides Birds by Roger Tory Peterson (Houghton Mifflin Company)
Peterson First Guides are the first books the beginning naturalist needs. Condensed versions of the famous Peterson Field Guides, the First Guides focus on the animals, plants, and other natural things you are most likely to see. They make it fun to get into the field and easy to progress to the full-fledged Peterson Guides.
Read pages 1-17 of opening.

A very slim, but nice pocket-sized guide. Probably the least comprehensive on my list. Has some basic names, info, and few pictures than others. Opening was pretty good on laying out structure for what to look out for.

This is definitely not the guide for me.

Replied to a tweet by Tim PrebbleTim Prebble (Twitter)
I had posted about watching Tim’s experiment and a fellow academic replied to me via Mastodon that about a reverse experiment from 1715 that may be of interest:

@chrisaldrich Everything old ( from 1715) is new again The Bird Fancyer’s Delight (Walsh, John) – IMSLP: Free Sheet Music PDF Download

Although strictly speaking, the goal here was to get birds to imitate the written recorder tunes rather than vice versa.

Jason Green, January 24, 2020 at 12:27 pm

Watched Bird Song Preludes - Proof of Concept by Tim PrebbleTim Prebble from YouTube

This is a proof of concept for a project I am doing later in the year, as part of the Auckland City Council Artists Residency, where I will be based in Little Huia for two months...

A fascinating experiment of taking birdsong and translating it into music. This is pretty cool!