👓 Learning How to Learn Math | Math3ma | Tai-Danae Bradley

Read Learning How to Learn Math by Tai-Danae BradleyTai-Danae Bradley (math3ma.com)
Once upon a time, while in college, I decided to take my first intro-to-proofs class. I was so excited. "This is it!" I thought, "now I get to learn how to think like a mathematician." You see, for the longest time, my mathematical upbringing was very... not mathematical. As a student in high school and well into college, I was very good at being a robot. Memorize this formula? No problem. Plug in these numbers? You got it. Think critically and deeply about the ideas being conveyed by the mathematics? Nope. It wasn't because I didn't want to think deeply. I just wasn't aware there was anything to think about. I thought math was the art of symbol-manipulation and speedy arithmetic computations. I'm not good at either of those things, and I never understood why people did them anyway. But I was excellent at following directions. So when teachers would say "Do this computation," I would do it, and I would do it well. I just didn't know what I was doing. By the time I signed up for that intro-to-proofs class, though, I was fully aware of the robot-symptoms and their harmful side effects. By then, I knew that math not just fancy hieroglyphics and that even people who aren't super-computers can still be mathematicians because—would you believe it?—"mathematician" is not synonymous with "human calculator." There are even—get this—ideas in mathematics, which is something I could relate to. ("I know how to have ideas," I surmised one day, "so maybe I can do math, too!") One of my instructors in college was instrumental in helping to rid me of robot-syndrome. One day he told me, "To fully understand a piece of mathematics, you have to grapple with it. You have to work hard to fully understand every aspect of it." Then he pulled out his cell phone, started rotating it about, and said, "It's like this phone. If you want to understand everything about it, you have to analyze it from all angles. You have to know where each button is, where each ridge is, where each port is. You have to open it up and see how it the circuitry works. You have to study it—really study it—to develop a deep understanding." "And that" he went on to say, "is what studying math is like."

A nice little essay on mathematics for old and young alike–and particularly for those who think they don’t understand or “get” math. It’s ultimately not what you think it is, there’s something beautiful lurking underneath.

In fact, I might say that unless you can honestly describe mathematics as “beautiful”, you should read this essay and delve a bit deeper until you get the understanding that’s typically not taught in mathematics until far too late in most people’s academic lives.

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👓 Who says neuroscientists don’t need more brains? Annotation with SciBot | Hypothesis

Read Who says neuroscientists don’t need more brains? Annotation with SciBot by Maryann Martone (web.hypothes.is/blog/)
You might think that neuroscientists already have enough brains, but apparently not. Over 100 neuroscientists attending the recent annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (SFN), took part in an annotation challenge: modifying scientific papers to add simple references that automatically generate and attach Hypothesis annotations, filled with key related information. To sweeten the pot, our friends at Gigascience gave researchers who annotated their own papers their very own brain hats.
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👓 All Those Books You’ve Bought but Haven’t Read? There’s a Word for That | New York Times

Read All Those Books You’ve Bought but Haven’t Read? There’s a Word for That by Kevin Mims (nytimes.com)
Most of us own books we’ve read and books we haven’t. Kevin Mims considers the importance of owning books we’ll never get around to finishing.

I had hoped for more here, but it’s just a recap of things I’ve read in either their original incarnations or via other resources.

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👓 Some IndieWeb WordPress tuning | EdTech Factotum

Replied to Some IndieWeb WordPress tuning by Clint LalondeClint Lalonde (EdTech Factotum)
Been spending a bit of time in the past 2 days adding some new functionality to the blog. I am making more of an effort to write more, thanks in no small part to the 9x9x25 blog challenge I am doin…

Right now, I just want to write.  

You might find that the micropub plugin is a worthwhile piece for this. It will give your site an endpoint you can use to post to your site with a variety of third party applications including Quill or Micropublish.net.
October 14, 2018 at 01:01AM

My hope is that it will somehow bring comments on Facebook back to the blog and display them as comments here.  

Sadly, Aaron Davis is right that Facebook turned off their API access for this on August 1st, so there currently aren’t any services, including Brid.gy, anywhere that allow this. Even WordPress and JetPack got cut off from posting from WordPress to Facebook, much less the larger challenge of pulling responses back.
October 14, 2018 at 01:03AM

Grant Potter  

Seeing the commentary from Greg McVerry and Aaron Davis, it’s probably worthwhile to point you to the IndieWeb for Education wiki page which has some useful resources, pointers, and references. As you have time, feel free to add yourself to the list along with any brainstorming ideas you might have for using some of this technology within your work realm. Many hands make light work. Welcome to the new revolution!
October 14, 2018 at 01:08AM

the autoposts from Twitter to Facebook were  

a hanging thought? I feel like I do this on my site all too often…
October 14, 2018 at 01:09AM

I am giving this one a go as it seems to be the most widely used.  

It is widely used, and I had it for a while myself. I will note that the developer said he was going to deprecate it in favor of some work he’d been doing with another Mastodon/WordPress developer though.
October 14, 2018 at 01:19AM

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👓 💬 Some IndieWeb WordPress tuning | Read Write Collect

Read Some IndieWeb WordPress tuning by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Great to see you tinkering Clint. Pretty sure the bridge to Facebook died with Cambridge Analytica. If you are looking for any ideas and inspiration, I highly recommend diving into Chris Aldrich’s research. There is always something there I feel I have overlooked.
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👓 Riding the Locals’ Favorite: El Prieto, Altadena, California | Singletracks Mountain Bike News

Read Riding the Locals’ Favorite: El Prieto, Altadena, California by Greg Heil (Singletracks.com)
El Prieto has been hailed by many as one of the best singletrack rides in the Los Angeles area. After hearing such accolades, I just had to check it out! And let me tell you: the reputation is not unfounded. To start the ride, park at the lot and head past the upper yellow gate on the paved road. Af...

It’s been a few years since I’ve ridden this trail, and I remember the trail itself being excellent, but don’t remember the ride up being as nice as described here–at least not in the open fire roads during the high heat of the day.

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Reposted Planned Parenthood Hosts Fall Benefit by Outlook Photos (Outlook Newspapers)

Sheri Bonner, Sally De Witt, and event co-chairs Stephanie Dencik and Stephanie McLemore

Planned Parenthood Pasadena and San Gabriel Valley hosted its annual Fall Benefit at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Pasadena on Saturday.

Hundreds of donors, advocates, and community and business leaders turned out for the event, which marks the organization’s 85th anniversary serving 24 communities. Stephanie Dencik and Stephanie McLemore served as the event’s co-chairs; Sheri Bonner is the local organization’s CEO.

Emcee Cristela Alonso shared her stories of finding care as a Latina and local high school students Amanda Estevez and Nick Sanchez brought the audience to their feet with their transformative experiences as Peer Advocates, serving as resources for sexual and reproductive health information in their schools and communities.

Other speakers included Dave Quast, PP Advocates board member and long-time advocate, and Dr. Leah Torres, a Utah-based OB/GYN whose health advocacy had helped bridge divides across conservative and progressive communities, states and countries.

see additional photos.

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👓 Free Speech in the Age of Algorithmic Megaphones | Wired

Read Free Speech in the Age of Algorithmic Megaphones (WIRED)
Researchers have long known that local actors—as well as Russia—use manipulative tactics to spread information online. With Facebook suspending a slew of domestic accounts, a difficult reckoning is upon us.

We need something in the digtial world that helps to put the brakes on gossip and falsehoods much the same way real life social networks tend to slow these things down. Online social networks that gamify and monopolize based on clicks using black box algorithms are destroying some of the fabric of our society.

Lies were able to go across the world before the truth had a chance to put on it’s breeches in the past, but it’s ability to do so now is even worse. We need to be able to figure out a way to flip the script.

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👓 Tech suffers from lack of humanities, says Mozilla head | The Guardian

Read Tech suffers from lack of humanities, says Mozilla head by Alex Hern (the Guardian)
Mitchell Baker says firms should hire philosophy and psychology graduates to tackle misinformation

Is it just me or am I seeing a major uptick in articles defending the humanities over the past several years? I find it interesting given the political climate (at least in the United States) where it seems the sciences are under attack–at least culturally. Perhaps both are under attack, but from very different perspectives and levels.

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👓 A few words about Cindy Lobel | Recode

Read A few words about Cindy Lobel by Kara Swisher (Recode)
She was part of the Recode family, and her tragic death last week leaves a hole in our lives.

A more personal obituary than the one in the NYT.

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👓 Cindy R. Lobel, Who Studied New York’s History Through Food, Dies at 48 | New York Times

Read Cindy R. Lobel, Who Traced New York History Through Food, Dies at 48 by Katherine Rosman (nytimes.com)
Professor Lobel was among the first historians to explore the economic and social elements of city life in the 19th century through the lens of eating.

I’m glad the NYT caught this and gave her an obituary. I suspect it’s in part because she’s more local to NYC in addition to her husband and his outlet’s influence as well as their recent push to cover the work of women better–a year ago, even more sadly, there likely would have been no mention of her passing.

I’ll have to bookmark her book to check out. With any luck, friends and colleagues will finish the book she’s currently working on.

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👓 Apple is about to do something their programmers definitely don’t want. | Anil Dash

Read Apple is about to do something their programmers definitely don't want. by Anil Dash (Anil Dash)
Apple spent $5 billion on a beautiful new office, Apple Park. So it’s amazing they’re about to make an extremely costly, avoidable mistake: putting their coders in an open-plan layout. I work at Fog Creek Software, where our cofounder and former CEO Joel Spolsky has been blogging for
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👓 Have the Hip Hop BBQ | Anil Dash

Read Have the Hip Hop BBQ by Anil Dash (Anil Dash)
I keep having to explain a principle I arrived at a few years ago when I realized the modern conservative movement is grounded almost entirely in a contrived sense of grievance, predicated on a false victimhood of its supporters. (That’s not to say some haven’t genuinely suffered some
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👓 We’re (still) not being alarmist enough about climate change | Anil Dash

Read We’re (still) not being alarmist enough about climate change by Anil Dash (Anil Dash)
What if we had another 9/11, and nothing happened? Living in New York City, the one fantasy sport that everybody plays is real estate; we all like to imagine what it would be like to be able to afford to buy a place. And sometime over the last year
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👓 The price of relevance is fluency | Anil Dash

Read The price of relevance is fluency by Anil Dash (Anil Dash)
“You can’t say anything anymore! You can’t even make jokes!” There’s a constant complaint from people in positions of power, mostly men, who keep making the ridiculous assertion that they’re not able to speak in public. What they actually mean is they no longer understand the

An awesome little essay. I highly recommend this for a useful lens into our current culture and particular with reference to fame, politics, and social media.

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