🎧 ‘The Daily’: A Crossroads for the Democratic Party | New York Times

Listened ‘The Daily’: A Crossroads for the Democratic Party by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com

In Georgia, two women were locked in a close race for the Democratic nomination for governor. What does this primary tell us about the future of the Democratic Party?

On today’s episode:

• Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading:

• Stacey Abrams, a former minority leader of the Georgia House, made history by becoming the first black woman to be a major party nominee for governor in the United States, defeating Stacey Evans in Georgia’s Democratic primary.

• The race between Ms. Abrams and Ms. Evans, two well-regarded candidates with starkly different campaign strategies, was viewed as a weather vane for the Democratic Party’s prospects in the midterm elections. Ms. Abrams banked on the support of young people, women, and African-American and Hispanic voters, while Ms. Evans reached out to moderate and conservative-leaning white voters.

• Here are the results for Tuesday’s primaries in ArkansasGeorgiaKentucky and Texas.

• Record numbers of women are running in the midterm elections, but the road to Capitol Hill is a hard one.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Teacher Fired Gun in Classroom, Barricaded Himself: Police | Time

Read Teacher Fired Gun in Classroom and Barricaded Himself at Georgia High School, Police Say by Associated Press (Time)
Police in Georgia say officers have responded to reports of shots fired at a Dalton high school and a teacher is now in custody

Saddened to hear about this school shooting incident at the neighboring high school just 23 miles from Calhoun High School, which I attended in Georgia. I remember driving to Dalton High School to take my S.A.T.s and frequently attend football and soccer games.

It’s potentially proof that arming teachers isn’t the great idea many thought it might have been just a week ago.

This now makes three school shootings in communities that I’ve either been directly touched by or been in close proximity to following two others: a shooting at Johns Hopkins in April 1996 involving a friend who was staying in my apartment at the time and the Heath High School Shooting in Paducah, KY in 1997 in the town where I’d lived briefly in 1996.

This has long since ceased to be a political issue and is a pressing public health issue that needs to be addressed on multiple levels.

Syndicated copies to:

🎧 Pecans and history | Eat This Podcast

Listened Pecans and history by Jeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast
The Guadalupe River that flows through Texas used to be known as The River of Nuts, a fact that Wikipedia does not confirm. The nut in question is the pecan, Carya illinoinensis, and the pecan tree is the state tree of Texas. The groves of wild pecans that lined the rivers of Texas are, however, threatened by the very popularity of the nuts they bear, and in particular by the fickle global nut market. The Chinese, you see, have gone nuts for pecans, increasing their purchase of American pecans from 3–4% in 2006 to 30–40% today. And if they abandon the pecan as quickly as they took it up, the wild pecan groves might be abandoned too. All this, and much more, I learned from James McWilliams, professor of history at Texas State University. His new book is one of those delights that looks at the global sweep of human endeavour through a little lens, in this case the pecan. Why it was the Chinese, rather than the French, the English or some other country, that chose to absorb the pecan surplus, I guess we’ll never know. McWilliams told me that Chinese people he spoke to believe the nuts prolong life; irrational as that may seem, no American grower is going to say they don’t. And while the high prices are good news for growers, they’re not so good for people who want pecan-containing industrial food.

Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS | More
Support this podcast: on Patreon


I grew up in rural Appalachia eating my fair share of wild pecans and thought I knew a good bit about them. I know even more now…

Syndicated copies to: