🎧 ‘The Daily’: One Family’s Reunification Story | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: One Family’s Reunification Story from New York Times

Since President Trump ended the practice of separating migrant children from their parents, few families have been reunited. Those that have are becoming national symbols.

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🎧 ‘The Daily’: The U.S. as a Place of Refuge | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: The U.S. as a Place of Refuge from New York Times

As large groups of Central American migrants approach the U.S. border, the Trump administration is making it more difficult for them to apply for asylum. Is the president undermining the original concept of asylum, or is he restoring it?

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📺 60 Minutes – November 25, 2018: Chaos on the Border, Robots to the Rescue, To Kill a Mockingbird | CBS News

Watched Chaos on the Border, Robots to the Rescue, To Kill a Mockingbird from CBS News

The chaos behind Donald Trump's policy of family separation at the border
A 60 Minutes investigation has found the separations that dominated headlines this summer began earlier and were greater in number than the Trump administration admits

Robots come to the rescue after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster
Seven years after a powerful earthquake and tsunami caused a massive nuclear meltdown in the Daiichi Power Plant, Lesley Stahl reports on the unprecedented cleanup effort

"To Kill a Mockingbird" comes to Broadway
With Aaron Sorkin writing the adaptation and Jeff Daniels starring as Atticus Finch, the Harper Lee classic hits the stage

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👓 How Japan’s prime minister plans to cope with daunting demography | The Economist

Read How Japan’s prime minister plans to cope with daunting demography (The Economist)
The reforms he has in mind are not bold enough
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👓 How the Case for Voter Fraud Was Tested — and Utterly Failed | ProPublica

Read How the Case for Voter Fraud Was Tested — and Utterly Failed (ProPublica)
From a new Supreme Court ruling to a census question about citizenship, the campaign against illegal registration is thriving. But when the top proponent was challenged in a Kansas courtroom to prove that such fraud is rampant, the claims went up in smoke.

I knew the voter fraud panel Trump convened had fizzled, but I didn’t hear that there was a court case and the concept flopped so painfully. This is some fantastic reporting. Glad I ran back across it while looking at the midterm elections results relating to Georgia and the massive voter suppression efforts that have been happening there this year.

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🎧 The Daily: ‘Divided,’ Part 2: The Chaos of Reunification | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: ‘Divided,’ Part 2: The Chaos of Reunification by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

The U.S. government denied that it had planned to separate migrant families. It also had no plans to bring them back together.

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🎧 The Daily: ‘Divided,’ Part 1: How Family Separations Started | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: ‘Divided,’ Part 1: How Family Separations Started by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

“The Daily” examines the repercussions of a U.S. policy that led to more than 2,000 migrant children being separated from their parents.

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👓 The Cruelty Is the Point | The Atlantic

Read The Cruelty Is the Point (The Atlantic)
Trump and his supporters find community by rejoicing in the suffering of those they hate and fear.

A searing piece of writing here. A must-read.

This makes a compelling argument about why some humans are so painfully cruel.

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🎧 ‘The Daily’: The Supreme Court Upholds Trump’s Travel Ban | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: The Supreme Court Upholds Trump’s Travel Ban by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

What does the Supreme Court’s endorsement of the travel ban say about the extent of the president’s power?

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🎧 ‘The Daily’: What Migrants Are Fleeing | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: What Migrants Are Fleeing by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

For large numbers of migrants making the journey to the U.S. from Central America, staying in their native countries is no longer an option.

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🎧 ‘The Daily’: Trump Ends His Child Separation Practice | New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: Trump Ends His Child Separation Practice by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

The president signed an executive order to keep immigrant parents and children together at the border. What happens now?

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🎧 FEMA Time | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to FEMA Time from On the Media | WNYC Studios
As Hurricane Florence bears down, we discover that FEMA has $10 million less in its budget. The money was siphoned off to pay for detention and removal of immigrants.

On Wednesday, as Florence swirled ominously off the coast of the Carolinas, and states prepared for imminent disaster, Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR) thought it would be a good time to draw everyone’s attention to the shifting priorities of this administration. Specifically, he released a budget that showed the Department of Homeland Security had transferred nearly 10 million dollars from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to Immigration and Customs Enforcement to pay for detention and removal operations.

FEMA officials maintain that the smaller budget won’t hinder their operations, but as wildfires rage and hurricanes make landfall, they have a lot on their plate. We don't think about FEMA much, until that's all we think about. Historian Garrett Graff says the agency’s, quote, “under-the-radar nature” was originally a feature, not a bug. Graff wrote about "The Secret History of FEMA" for Wired last September and he spoke to Bob about the agency's Cold War origins as civil defense in the event of a nuclear attack and how it transitioned to "natural" disaster response. Plus, they discuss the limitations to FEMA's capabilities and why it has such a spotty record. Graff is also author of Raven Rock: The Story of the U.S. Government's Secret Plan to Save Itself -- While The Rest of Us Die.

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🎧 “General Chapman's Last Stand” Season 3 Episode 5 | Revisionist History

Listened to “General Chapman's Last Stand” Season 3 Episode 5 by Malcolm Gladwell from Revisionist History

"Good fences make good neighbors. Or maybe not."

General Leonard Chapman guided the Marines Corp through some of the most difficult years in its history. He was brilliant, organized, decisive and indefatigable. Then he turned his attention to the America’s immigration crisis. You think you want effective leadership? Be careful what you wish for.

A piece of history I was surprised to not have heard about with relation to current immigration policy. Also a great example of how policy makers need to be able to think 20 steps into the potential futures to realize the ramifications of what they’re doing an the effects it will have on future generations.

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👓 The White House Unified On Old Issues — And Then Started New Fights | Five Thirty Eight

Read The White House Unified On Old Issues — And Then Started New Fights by Perry Bacon Jr. (Five Thirty Eight)
The Trump administration has deep internal conflicts. That was true when President Trump was sworn into office, and it’s true now. But the nature of those conflicts has changed: The mostly ideological fights of 2017 seem to have somewhat subsided, while issues around Russia are creating new (and maybe even bigger) fissures.
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👓 Court rules children facing deportation have no right to court-appointed lawyer | The Hill

Read Court rules children facing deportation have no right to court-appointed lawyer (TheHill)
Immigrant children who enter the country illegally with their parents have no right to a government-appointed lawyer in court, an appeals court ruled Monday
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