Read Announcing new ways to read and find writers on Substack (blog.substack.com)
Today, we’re introducing new ways to discover writers on our homepage, as well as the beta version of Substack Reader, a new way to keep up with your newsletters.
Great to see another feed reader enter the fray. While it definitely focuses on Substack newsletters and is incredibly limited in functionality at the moment, it does support RSS feeds in general. 

I’m hoping it might add JSON feed and h-feed support as well, but it’ll need a lot of work to displace feed readers like Monocle, Together, or Indigenous as my daily drivers.

Read The Substackerati by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Clio Chang reports on the rise of Substack. Established in 2017 by Chris Best, Hamish McKenzie, and Jairaj Sethi, it was designed as a platform that allowed users to earn an income. A part of this move is to approach potential contributors. The problem is that it still replicates the patterns of mar...
I spent some time tonight looking at Substack as a platform. It’s impressive just how many people I follow on Twitter use it as yet-another-platform to be on. I wonder how much duplication of content they’re generating? How I wish that everyone could simply have one canonical place to follow them.

One thing I find myself wanting is a discovery-based follow button for Microsub that would allow me to input either my own following list or even my Twitter account which would then parse through my Twitter follows to allow me to quickly follow the personal websites that appear in people’s Twitter website and bio fields. 

Screenshot from Substack with a Twitter button to find newsletters from people one follows there

Read Andrew Sullivan: See You Next Friday (Intelligencer)
If the mainstream media will not host a diversity of opinion, then the nonmainstream needs to pick up the slack. That’s what I’ll be doing next.
This is interesting, though sad to see he’s going to Substack to run his new blog incarnation. I suspect he’s following the model of Jonah Goldberg who is doing roughly the same thing. The “newsletter trend” as a means of running a blog and attempting to monetize it is certainly an interesting one. I’m curious how valuable readers find it? I wish there were some better open web versions that were easier for individuals to run in an IndieWeb fashion. The pattern is a lot like Patreon and some others, but here there is the appearance of more publishing control as well as the removal of the appearance of begging for money to fund something.