📑 Building a digital garden | Tom Critchlow

Annotated Building a digital garden by Tom CritchlowTom Critchlow (tomcritchlow.com)

A blog without a publish button

I’m stealing this quote from my modern friend Ryan Dawidjan who has been pioneering this concept of open-access writing and blogging without a publish button. For a long time he has maintained a quip file called high cadence thoughts that is open access and serves as a long-running note of his thinking and ideas.

It’s a less-performative version of blogging - more of a captain’s log than a broadcast blog.

The distinction will come down to how you blog - some people blog in much the same way. For me however blogging is mostly performative thinking and less captain’s log. So I am looking for a space to nurture, edit in real time and evolve my thinking.  

I like the idea of a blog without a publish button. I do roughly the same thing with lots of drafts unpublished that I let aggregate content over time. The difference is that mine aren’t immediately out in public for other’s benefit. Though I do wonder how many might read them, comment on them, or potentially come back to read them later in a more finished form.

📑 Of Digital Streams, Campfires and Gardens | Tom Critchlow

Annotated Of Digital Streams, Campfires and Gardens by Tom CritchlowTom Critchlow (tomcritchlow.com)

Campfires - mostly blogging for me, though I know some folks gather around private slack groups too. My blog functions as a digital campfire (or a series of campfires) that are slower burn but fade relatively quickly over the timeframe of years. Connection forming, thinking out loud, self referencing and connection forming. This builds muscle, helps me articulate my thinking and is the connective tissue between ideas, people and more. While I’m not a daily blogger I’ve been blogging on and off for 10+ years.  

📑 Building a digital garden | Tom Critchlow

Annotated Building a digital garden by Tom CritchlowTom Critchlow (tomcritchlow.com)
Catch up by reading my last post of digital streams, campfires and gardens.  

I immediately thought of a post from Mike Caulfield (Hapgood). Interesting to see that Tom has already read and referenced it in his prior post.

📑 High Cadence Thoughts | Ryan Dawidjan

Annotated High Cadence Thoughts by Ryan Dawidjan (High Cadence Thoughts)
‪if you’re ever feeling down, just remember that the greatest talents of our time were all once consistently fooled by peek-a-boo   

📑 High Cadence Thoughts | Ryan Dawidjan

Annotated High Cadence Thoughts by Ryan Dawidjan (High Cadence Thoughts)
I blog to share and learn. rarely teach. I think the imposed pressure on the latter keeps a lot of blog posts from great people hidden - lost tweet from spring 2015  

In reference to:

📑 What the earliest fragments of English reveal | BBC

Annotated What the earliest fragments of English reveal by Cameron Laux (bbc.com)
If you would like to comment on this story or anything else you have seen on BBC Culture, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter.  

So sad to see that they’ve abrogated their responsibility for comments on their site to Twitter and Facebook

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
This a harrowing story made even sadder by the grim reality of the statistics.  

I’m almost losing count of how many racial health disparity stories I’ve been seeing lately. It’s so common I’ve got tags for it on my site now.

👓 I Was Pregnant and in Crisis. All the Doctors and Nurses Saw Was an Incompetent Black Woman | Time

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)

Learning and Teaching

Letter Grades are the Enemy of Authentic & Humane Learning: Bernard Bull discusses how grades work against authentic and self-determined learning. Although they are ingrained in education, he recommends considering the aspects of life free from grades and having these conversations with others. What is interesting is this is only one post being shared at the moment. Bill Ferriter shared his concerns about the association between standard grades and fixed mindset, while Will Richardson argues that grades only matter because we choose to let them matter.This continues some of the points discussed in Clive Rose’s book The End of Average and Jesse Stommell’s presentation on grades and the LMS. It is also something that Templestowe College has touched in the development of alternative pathways to higher education.  

Thanks for aggregating a variety of sources here!

I’d recently come across Robert Talbert’s post Traditional Grading: The Great Demotivator which likely fits into this same sub-topic.

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
eating in a ‘twelve hour window’  

Ha! I recently ran across sever people pushing fasting apps including one called Zero which encourages fasting for 16 hours (or essentially skipping one meal a day.)

Many have been quietly pushing this for the past few years in relation to things like the paleo diet, etc. I’ll also note that Nassim Nicholas Taleb has mentioned something like it frequently (since you mention flaneuring below).

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
Are there any other texts that you would add to my list to guide my personal inquiry this year?  

You might take a quick search into some of the writings of Nassim Nicholas Taleb relating to the idea. He mentions some of the benefits of being a flâneur interspersed in several of his books as side topics, but I’m sure he’s got to have an essay or two on the overall topic.

He’s one of the people I’ve noticed using the word (in his case as a title which he might put as a profession on his business card) in the past 20 years who seems to have brought it to the social forefront to the point that many of your other references have been influenced by it.

I think there’s a lot to be learned about the overarching idea, so I’m interested to see what you come up with on an extended survey of the word as you progress.

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
This makes me wonder about the realities of Australia’s indigenous people and and systemic inequality in Australia’s society.  

You might be interested in the last section of a recent episode of On the Media. It discusses a documentary (bordering on reality show) relating to indigenous peoples of Canada, which I think made brief mention of Australia and a similar project there. While I’m sure there are some very striking differences between these indigenous peoples, there are also some not surprising similarity in the ways in which they are exploited and marginalized.

In general I liked the idea of what the documentary was and represented and wish there were versions for other countries.

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
interview with John Naughton, Shoshana Zuboff touches on the feeling of ‘informed bewilderment’  

This reminds me that I need to listen to a recent long-form interview she gave to Leo Laporte on Triangulation.

📑 Read Write Respond #037 | Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis

Annotated Read Write Respond #037 by Aaron DavisAaron Davis (Read Write Collect)
A return to RSS or is there something else again in the development of the web?  

There are other options out there, though in many cases distribution is uneven. There are new specs like JSONFeed which many sites and feed readers support just in the last year.

There are also simpler methods than RSS now including the microformats-based h-feed which one can use to create a simple feed that many feed readers will support.

Part of RSS’s ubiquity is that it is simply so prevalent that most common CMSs still support it. The fact that the idea of RSS is so old and generally un-evolving means there isn’t a lot of maintenance involved once it’s been set up.

📑 Scoop: Leaked private schedules show Trump spent 60% of last 3 months in “Executive Time” | Axios

Annotated Scoop: Leaked private schedules show Trump spent 60% of last 3 months in "Executive Time" (Axios)
Responding to Axios' reporting, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders emailed this statement: "President Trump has a different leadership style than his predecessors and the results speak for themselves."

They just don’t say very much or anything very good.

“I’m a skunkologist,” he explained. “My world is the skunk world.”

Annotated This Can't Be Happening at MacDonald Hall! by Gordon Korman (Scholastic )
“I’m a skunkologist,” he explained. “My world is the skunk world.”