Filed an Issue Make a Comparator (splot.ca)
Create your own! This tool will produce much better results if the images are much larger than the intended size (e.g. 1400 x 800 at least) since it needs to downsize the original to fit the different dimensions.
Alan, I took a swing at trying out the live Comparator SPLOT today. It’s very cool looking! Sadly I kept getting an error in the WP upload interface simply saying “An error occurred in the upload. Please try again later.”

I was uploading a simple .jpg of about the same size and dimensions as those recommended and already in the repository. I tried a few different photo sizes and types with the same result, so I’m not sure what the underlying issue may be. Unless something has changed dramatically, my one guess would be to check the storage limits on the hosting account. I’ve seen that sort of failure before when running out of physical space on a host.

Incidentally, from a security standpoint, I’ll mention that it appears one has the ability within that interface to delete others’ previously uploaded photos. (May want to look at that as a potential future improvement.)

Hope you’re holding up!

Read Instagram-like app to track photographer websites by Matt Maldre (Spudart)
I’m thinking about what the domain would be for my photo website. And then an idea struck me. What if someone made an app that looked JUST like Instagram. But all the photos came from RSS feeds from individual photographer websites. You could subscribe to a whole list of photographer websites, and their photos will …
I could totally see this as an IndieWeb-based app! Perhaps there’s a way to modify or use one of the Microsub clients to filter for photos for focusing on and doing just this very thing?

My photos are far from the sort of artistic thing you’re looking for, but it would be nice if one could find a broader section of websites that provided photo-specific feeds like mine.

Micro.blog has a photo specific feed and Pixelfed is in this general wheelhouse, but possibly not quite what you’re talking about.

Read The Evolving Exhibition of Us: A Decade of Sharing Pictures Online : Adjacent Issue 6 by Summer Bedard (itp.nyu.edu)
A deep examination and self-reflection on photo sharing of the last decade, Summer Bedard’s article looks at how the previously intimate, cumbersome experience has morphed into the edited, contrived perfection found on Instagram.

The explosion of people, marked a shift from having a community to having an audience. This ultimately changed the mental model of what gets posted. People act differently in their living room than they do on stage. They may feel more vulnerable and guarded. You’re sharing with a community, but working for an audience.

–November 28, 2019 at 09:42PM

I would love to see a future where enjoying photos becomes more like enjoying music. Spotify gives you an easy way to consider options by assessing your mood and putting together an appropriate playlist that feels personal. We could do the same for images. Can you imagine opening Spotify and having it blast a random song immediately? Our current Instagram home screen is the visual equivalent of a playlist mashup of country, classical, techno, hip hop, and polka. 

I like the idea of this. Can someone build it please?
–November 28, 2019 at 09:46PM

What if you could use AI to control the content in your feed? Dialing up or down whatever is most useful to you. If I’m on a budget, maybe I don’t want to see photos of friends on extravagant vacations. Or, if I’m trying to pay more attention to my health, encourage me with lots of salads and exercise photos. If I recently broke up with somebody, happy couple photos probably aren’t going to help in the healing process. Why can’t I have control over it all, without having to unfollow anyone. Or, opening endless accounts to separate feeds by topic. And if I want to risk seeing everything, or spend a week replacing my usual feed with images from a different culture, country, or belief system, couldn’t I do that, too? 

Some great blue sky ideas here.
–November 28, 2019 at 09:48PM

Read Automatic Featured Image Posts by Jeremy Felt (jeremyfelt.com)
This is an information and discussion page for the WordPress plugin, Automatic Featured Image Posts. Feel free to leave comments or suggestions about the plugin below or download Automatic Featured Image Posts through the WordPress repository. You can also fork and/or contribute to Automatic Feature...
Cool idea here for those who want to own and display all of their photos.

👓 📺 Bokeh is on Kickstarter | Bright Pixels

Read Bokeh is on Kickstarter by Timothy Smith (Bright Pixels)
It’s been a crazy two days. Yesterday, I published the Kickstarter for Bokeh. At the time of writing this, the project is 36 percent funded. I’m grateful to everyone who’s backed the project and shared it. There’s been a lot of stress building up to this moment. I believe in this ...
There’s not quite as much detail here as one could want. On first blush there’s nothing here when I read it because I missed the fact that there’s a video. But even with the video the details were awfully muddled about what exactly this will end up being. The fact that he mentions that it will be IndieWeb friendly could be interesting. I’m worried if some of the forthcoming microsub readers will render parts of this less useless unless it expands into other content types the way micro.blog has already.

👓 Photos | Tom MacWright

Read Photos by Tom MacWright (macwright.org)
My photos are on macwright.org now: /photos. I don’t like Instagram. I know that other people like it: they found a community there. They keep in touch with family. They share interests and life events. But I just don’t: I don’t like how browsing Instagram makes me feel. I don’t like how it shapes my photos, how it works as a product. I don’t like that it’s a Facebook company. How it doesn’t have critical APIs. You can’t cross-post to Instagram without using the app. By creating my own place to post photography, I can start to like taking photos again. I can feel like my process of taking film photos, scanning them, and putting them on the web is worthwhile. That learning how to tweak camera raw in Capture One is fun. I can post just a photo or two a month. I don’t want to engage, I want to create.
Tom has a great sketch for how he’s owning his own photos on his own website.

👓 Indie WYSIWYG: How I Fixed My Instagram Problem | Alex Kearney

Read Indie WYSIWYG: How I Fixed My Instagram Problem by Alex Kearney (kongaloosh.com)
I talk about what-you-see-is-what-you-get posting system for my site and how it improved my post quality.