👓 How to get on the #indieweb! | hag.codes

Read a post by Yulia Yulia (Hello)

How to get on the #indieweb! (not very detailed but hopefully gets people interested!)

An IndieWeb comic

I like how a comic can make the IndieWeb so much more approachable. Sometimes I feel like a nebulous purple potato.

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👓 State of the Social Reader | Interdependent Thoughts

Read State of the Social Reader by Ton ZijlstraTon Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
Last weekend during the Berlin IndieWeb Camp, Aaron Parecki gave a brief overview of where he/we is/are concerning the ‘social reader’. This is of interest to me because since ever I have been reading RSS, I’m doing by hand what he described doing more automatically. These are some notes I mad...
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👓 (Mind you, since you can self-host Mastodon, you … | Aral’s Mastodon | Aral Balkan

Read a post by Aral BalkanAral Balkan (Aral’s Mastodon)
(Mind you, since you can self-host Mastodon, you should really verify links yourself instead of relying on a cosmetic feature as I could have just faked that via a bit of CSS.) ;)
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👓 Thinking through the IWC Berlin displaying responses session | Eddie Hinkle

Read Thinking through the IWC Berlin displaying responses session by Eddie HinkleEddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)
I remotely attended the Displaying Responses session of IndieWebCamp Berlin 2018. It was very interesting and they made some good progress thinking though how to deal with how and when to display responses received to posts on your website. They came to the conclusion that there are four groups of people that you want to treat their responses differently: Accepted / Immediate Connections 2nd level connections Everyone Mute or Blocked Accepted / Immediate Connections These are essentially your friends on Facebook or your follow list on Twitter. These are people that you have chosen to connect with in some way and this logical conclusions can be drawn around the level of interactions you're willing to have. My plan is to display these responses completely (name, photo and content of response). This list will be generated for me by adding anyone I follow, as well as anyone I have sent a reply to. This will NOT add people to whom I have liked, emoji reacted, quoted, or bookmarked. Those are lower level responses that do not indicate a deeper level of a desire to connect with that person. 2nd Level Connections These are "friends of friends". You can assume they won't do anything TOO bad, but you might not want them posting all over your site. There is a deeper level of trust here because of mutual connection but still some care should be taken. This can be determined through different ways. One way that has been brainstormed in the IndieWeb is Vouch. I don't currently track 2nd level connections but I liked how Tantek thought this through, so my plan is for replies to display their photo and name as "other people that have responded to this post", but not display the content of their reply. I also think if they send a like, emoji reaction or quote, I'll display it just like I would an Immediate Connection. Everyone This is the World Wide Web, and anyone could send anything to my website via webmention. So this is a category you likely want to moderate. My initial thought is I will accept likes, quotes and emoji reactions from them but I won't list attribution of who did it while moderated, just the reaction itself. For replies I am considering potentially listing the url of the author of the post under "other people who have replied" but no name, photo or content while moderated. Mute or Blocked These are people who you do not trust for whatever reasons have happened for you. You don't want to associate with them in any way. Responses are not displayed from these people and they are not listed in the moderation queue. Some thoughts on moderation This means I'll need a moderation queue. Anything from a 2nd level connection or from the Everyone group will enter the moderation queue. Responses from 2nd level connections should appear higher in the queue than responses from the Everyone group. From there I can choose to: approve a response (display it like an immediate connection) approve response and accept author (makes this author an immediate connection so they aren't moderated anymore) ignore response (this leaves the response as is, it leaves the queue but doesn't display additional details) remove response (this removes the response from my storage) remove response and block author (this both removes the response from my storage and makes sure I don't receive responses from them in the future) All in all, it was a great session that I really enjoyed and I'm looking forward to actually working on implementing some of these features into my site.

A well laid out synopsis of how this could be done well. Filing for future templating.

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👓 Mapping Microformats To This Site | Interdependent Thoughts

Read Mapping Microformats To This Site by Ton ZijlstraTon Zijlstra (zylstra.org)

As a first step to better understand the different layers of adding microformats to my site (what is currently done by the theme, what by plugins etc.), I decided to start with: what is supposed to go where?

I made a post-it map on my wall to create an overview for myself. The map corresponds to the front page of my blog.

Green is content, pink is h- elements, blue u- elements, and yellow p- elements, with the little square ones covering dt- and rel’s. All this is based on the information provided on the http://microformats.org/wiki/Main_Page, and not on what my site actually does. So next step is a comparison of what I expect to be there from this map, to what is actually there. This map is also a useful step to see how to add microformats to the u-design theme for myself.

This is an interesting visual exercise.

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Reply to Ton Zijlstra about microformats in WordPress

Replied to Better Blending of Micro Formats with WordPress Themes by Ton Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
Earlier this week I discussed microformats with Elmine. Microformats make your website machine readable, allowing other computers and applications to e.g. find out where my contact information is, and the metadata from my postings. It was a discussion that branched off a conversation on online repre...

Ton, one of the best “crash courses” I’ve seen for working toward adding microformats to a pre-existing WordPress theme is David Shanske’s GitHub repo forking of the WordPress TwentySixteen Theme. If you follow the list of commits in chronological order from the oldest, you’ll get a good idea of what could and should be done and even how to do it.

Naturally, keep in mind that some themes may also have a few already implemented while others may have them implemented poorly (and sometimes even wrong).

👓 Better Blending of Micro Formats with WordPress Themes | Interdependent Thoughts

Read Better Blending of Micro Formats with WordPress Themes by Ton Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
Earlier this week I discussed microformats with Elmine. Microformats make your website machine readable, allowing other computers and applications to e.g. find out where my contact information is, and the metadata from my postings. It was a discussion that branched off a conversation on online repre...
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👓 It’s a Link Thing (Re: Graph-Based Indie-reading) | Kicks Condor

Read It’s a Link Thing (Re: Graph-Based Indie-reading) by Kicks Condor (kickscondor.com)
Cool, yes, the alert worked! That alone is very worthwhile and goes a long way toward discovery. In a way, I think this is the most idealized form—you’ve just done the equivalent of “Hey, check this out” and I am very fortunate that I get to read your reasoning rather than to simply see a li...
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👓 The idea that “a Reader could boost …” | known.stierand.org

Read a post by Björn StierandBjörn Stierand (Björn Stierand)
The idea that "a Reader could boost posts when they are from a feed that is not regularly updated" is implemented in Newsblur, my RSS reader of choice. They call it "Infrequent Site Stories" and it is a quite powerful tool to find interesting pieces of information in a huge number of posts. http://b...

I hadn’t been aware that any feed readers had this type of functionality! Glad to see it’s out there and others are considering implementing it.

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👓 It’s a link thing | Jeremy Cherfas

Read It's a link thing by Jeremy Cherfas
This is too good to be true. Yesterday I read Sebastiaan's write-up of how he graphically a link between two individuals who both liked the same thing on the internet, and how, by doing that, he could alert himself to things he might like.
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👓 Three things about Readers during IndieWebCamp Nürnberg | Seblog

Read Three things about Readers during IndieWebCamp Nürnberg by Sebastiaan AndewegSebastiaan Andeweg (seblog.nl)

This year is marked as the ‘Year of the Reader’, and indeed, there was a lot of Reader talk last weekend. I really like the progress we are making with Microsub and apps like Indigenous, but I also noticed we’re not there yet for me. But that’s not a discouragement, quite the opposite!

This blogpost has three parts: first I describe the painpoints I feel at the moment, then I describe what I have been hacking on yesterday, and in the last part I share some other ideas we talked about over dinner in Nürnberg, that where not recorded in any form other than short notes on some phones.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

this is another single point of Aaron in our stack.  

As opposed to another single point of Ryan….
November 08, 2018 at 08:59AM

I have discovered new interesting posts by looking at the likes my friends post.  

November 08, 2018 at 09:07AM

More ways to combat feed overwhelm
Before IndieWebCamp, we had a discussion about Readers in a traditional Nürnberger restaurant. Here also, people came up with some ideas to deal with accruing unread-counts.
One idea came from how Aperture deletes posts after 7 days. This actually prevents the overload. It would be nice if you can tell your reader that, for example your Twitter feed, is ephemeral and that the posts can be discarded if you did not read them in time.
One other idea that came up was to keep track of the average time between posts of a certain feed. This way a Reader could boost posts when they are from a feed that is not regularly updated. These kind of posts are usually lost in piles of more posts from more frequently updates feeds.
Yet a last idea was to tell your reader to leave out posts with certain words for a small period of time. This can come in handy when you haven’t watched the newest episode of Game of Thrones yet, but want to stay connected to your feeds without spoilers.  

Some good ideas here to deal with feeds.
November 08, 2018 at 09:10AM

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👓 The Commons: The Past Is 100% Part of Our Future | Flickr

Read The Commons: The Past Is 100% Part of Our Future (Flickr Blog)
We are very proud of the The Flickr Commons photos uploaded by galleries, libraries, archives, museums, and governmental institutions. These photos won’t be deleted as a result of any of our announ…

Great to see them explicitly address the questions they’ve been getting about archival value of photos as well as the commons and Creative Commons licensed photos on their service.

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Spent a few minutes late this afternoon to update the CSS on my website to hide the automatic titles given to annotation and highlight posts. Also modified these slightly to give the highlighted/quoted portion of other sites a highlighter-yellow color.

An example of the yellow highlight color of highlighted/annotated posts on my website. Previously the quoted portions had been a muted grey like other posts.

❤️ DawnHeuft tweet: Own your own content. Learning about IndieWeb.org at Chris Aldrich session.

Liked a tweet by Dawn HeuftDawn Heuft (Twitter)
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❤️ genoq tweet: Great reminder that social platforms come and go and so does the content you put on there

Liked a tweet by Geno QuirozGeno Quiroz (Twitter)
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