An Indieweb Podcast: Episode 4 “Webmentions and Privacy”

Episode 4: Webmentions and Privacy


Running time: 1 h 16m 00s | Download (23.8 MB) | Subscribe by RSS

Summary: With the GDPR regulations coming into effect in Europe on May 25th, privacy seems to be on everyone’s mind. This week, we tackle what webmentions are, using them for backfeed, and the privacy implications.

 

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Show Notes

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👓 Webmention for ProcessWire Update | gRegorLove

Read Webmention for ProcessWire Update by gRegor MorrillgRegor Morrill (gregorlove.com)
Version 2.0.0 of the Webmention for ProcessWire module is released. Webmention is a web standard that enables conversations across the web, a powerful building block that is used for a growing federated network of comments, likes, reposts, and other rich interactions across the decentralized social ...

 

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There’s been some recent revival of chat about fragmentions and the fragmentioner within the IndieWeb community which enable the ability to more easily highlight and annotate individual portions of a web page and target them directly via URL.

This caused me to take a look at where the conversations on webmentions went within the Hypothesis project. Unless they’re hiding offline or somewhere else, it would appear that they’ve stalled, though I have a feeling that it could be an interesting notification method for Hypothesis to indicate to a site that it’s been highlighted or annotated. Also given that the Webmention spec is a W3C recommendation as of January 2017 compared to its status in 2014 when the topic was last brought up on the GitHub repo.

As a result of the above, if they’re free, I’d love to extend an invitation to Dan Whaley (t), Jon Udell (t), Jeremy Dean (t), Nate Angell (t), or anyone else working on the Hypothes.is project to join us in Portland this June 26-27 for the annual IndieWebSummit / IndieWebCamp.  I highly suspect there will be some heavy interest in the topics of open ways of annotating, highlighting, and notifying websites as well as UI/UX discussion around this area which we can all continue to expand and improve upon. And naturally there are sure to be a broad area of other topics at the summit that will be of interest in addition to these.

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🔖 Notes on the future of the WithKnown Commercial Product

Bookmarked Notes on the future of the WithKnown Commercial Product

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Reply to Anna Holmes’ post about using cheese as a bookmark

Replied to a tweet by Anna Holmes (Twitter)

Move over chicken. I can already see someone in the IndieWeb community creating a Cheese post kind to begin cheesemarking content on the internet.

 

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👓 Privacy | David Shanske

Read Privacy by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (David Shanske)
I admit to a certain amount of frustration on the subject of privacy lately. It seems, in all aspects of my life, both personal and professional, the new data privacy regulations that the EU rolls out May 25th are a theme in every discussion.

Some interesting thoughts on personal data and privacy. I can’t wait to talk to David about some of this in greater depth in our next podcast episode.

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🎧 This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • April 14th – 20th, 2018

Listened to This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • April 14th - 20th, 2018 by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re
IndieWeb Leaders Summit planning, escaping social media maniplation, and printing out websites. It’s the audio edition for This Week in the IndieWeb for April 14th - 20th, 2018.

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🎧 This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • April 21st-27th, 2018

Listened to This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • April 21st-27th, 2018 by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re
Readers on the rise, APIs on the decline, and Reddit regrets. It’s the audio edition for This Week in the IndieWeb for April 21st - 27th, 2018.

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👓 Daniel Goldsmith’s reply to Sebastian Greger

Read a post by Daniel Goldsmith (View from ASCRAEUS)

Sebastian, first of all, thank you for your detailed write up on this issue. I think much of your roadmap is worthwhile, and of great interest.

I cannot, however, say that I am convinced by your contentions regarding the effect of GDPR and indieweb sites. In particular, I think your definitions are excessively broad, and you elide much information from both the Regulation itself and the Recitals.

It’s certainly interesting to see some of the replies to Sebastian’s article. It’s definitely stirring up some interesting thought. Daniel’s reply here is primarily to the legal issues at stake more than the design related issues, which have some interesting merit aside from the legal ones.

I think I fall somewhere in the middle of the two and see some of the moral and ethical pieces which are more important from a people perspective. I’m not as concerned about the law portion of it for a large variety of reasons. It’s most interesting to me to see the divide between how those in the EU and particularly Germany view the issue and those in the United States which may be looking at regulations in the coming years, particularly after the recent Facebook debacle.

As I think of these, I’m reminded about some of the cultural differences between Europe and the United States which Jeff Jarvis has expounded upon over the past several years. Europeans are generally more leery of corporations and trust government a bit more while in America it’s the opposite.

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👓 The Web We Need to Give Students | BRIGHT Magazine

Read The Web We Need to Give Students by Audrey Watters (BRIGHT Magazine)
“Giving students their own digital domain is a radical act. It gives them the ability to work on the Web and with the Web.”

Not sure how this surfaced into my feeds again today, but interesting to see it pop up. I’m also noticing that Audrey smartly posted a copy to her own site after it appeared in Bright.

In this article, she touches on some reasons why it’s important for students to have their own domain, but many of these ideas and arguments also work well for almost anyone. It’s interesting to see how similar the philosophy she describes here dovetails with that of the IndieWeb.

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👓 I believe in the IndieWeb. It needs to believe in itself. | Jason McIntosh

Read I believe in the IndieWeb. It needs to believe in itself. by Jason McIntosh (Fogknife)
IndieWeb has forged keys to a better, more democratic web for everyone. They need to get organized before they can start really effecting change.

I love the enthusiasm and excitement here and still share it to a great extent myself. At the same time, however some of the tools are still growing and aren’t quite ready for prime time, particularly for the masses who don’t have the technical expertise yet. As a result, slow continued growth may still be the best course.

On the other hand, I think the area is incredibly ripe for businesses to come in and offer “IndieWeb as a service”. A few more things like micro.blog will certainly help to tip the balance.

Much like the featured photo on the post, while there’s some gorgeous blue sky, there’s still a few clouds, and some of the waters may be difficult to navigate for some without the correct boats. But at the end of the day, this is exactly the kind of paradise world many of us have wanted to live in for a long time!

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👓 human beings | Khürt Williams

Read human beings (Island in the Net)
I’m saddened that a blog post linking to another blog post might need to include a disclaimer even if some of it is in jest. A part of me thinks we’re headed down a path of permission based interactions. Both online and offline. If that happens during my lifetime I’ll exit this experiment called the USA, to places where human beings are still human beings.

I was being facetious and satirical, but all the same… This is just the type of response I was aiming at eliciting.

Fantastic photo, by the way!

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RSVP to IndieWeb Summit – June 26-27, 2018 – Portland, Oregon

RSVPed Attending IndieWeb Summit - June 26-27, 2018 - Portland, Oregon
The eighth annual gathering for independent web creators of all kinds, from graphic artists, to designers, UX engineers, coders, hackers, to share ideas, actively work on creating for their own personal websites, and build upon each others creations.

I can’t wait!

Reply to “Post New” page not showing Reply to URL · Issue #168

Replied to "Post New" page not showing Reply to URL · Issue #168 dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds (GitHub)

Sorry, David, I seem to be breaking your stuff left right and centre.

I've been using Post Kinds plug to post replies to other websites, but then last night when I clicked on "reply" in Kinds, the usual URL bar (for pasting in the article URL I'm replying to) doesn't show up.

I thought it was because of one of the plugins I've installed, so I restored my WP back to an instance when the URL bar was showing. After the restore, Post Kinds starts working again, but after posting a couple of posts (without adding any new plugins) the URL bar stops showing again.

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong.

I’ve seen some issues similar to this, but haven’t been able to figure out what the root cause may be. It began in the version of Post Kinds just after you updated the Response Properties Meta box moving based on the post kind being chosen.

In general, the problem seems to be that the Response Properties checkbox in the Screen Options (in the top right hand corner of the admin UI) doesn’t seem to remember its prior state. Thus I’ve needed to occasionally open the screen options and recheck the Response Properties box to see its meta box.

I’ve played around with it a bit, but can’t always reliably recreate the issue. It does seem to be happening less frequently now compared to when I originally upgraded. Is it possible that the checkbox state is only saved per kind?

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Reply to The Indieweb privacy challenge (Webmentions, silo backfeeds, and the GDPR) by Sebastian Greger

Replied to The Indieweb privacy challenge (Webmentions, silo backfeeds, and the GDPR) by Sebastian GregerSebastian Greger (sebastiangreger.net)
Originally intended to showcase a privacy-centred implementation of emerging social web technologies – with the aim to present a solution not initially motivated by legal requirements, but as an example of privacy-aware interaction design – my “social backfeed” design process unveiled intricate challenges for Indieweb sites, both for privacy in general and legal compliance in particular.

Again Sebastian Greger has written up a well-thought-out and nuanced approach to design. Here he discusses privacy and GDPR with a wealth of research and direct personal experience in these areas. He’s definitely written something interesting which I hope sparks the beginning of a broader conversation and evaluation of our ethics.

There’s so much to think about and process here, that I’ll have to re-read and think more specifically about all the details. I hope to come back to this later to mark it up and annotate it further.

I’ve read relatively deeply about a variety of privacy issues as well as the weaponization of data and its improper use by governments and businesses to unduly influence people. For those who are unaware of this movement over the recent past, I would highly recommend Cathy O’Neil’s text Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, which provides an excellent overview with a variety of examples about how the misuse of data can be devastating not just to individuals who are broadly unaware of it, but entire segments of society.

There is a lot of publicly available data we reveal via social media and much of it one might flippantly consider “data exhaust” which has little, if any inherent value by itself. Unfortunately when used in aggregate, it can reveal striking things about us which we may either not be aware of ourselves or which  we wouldn’t want to be openly known.

My brief thought here is that much like the transition from the use of smaller arms and handguns, which can kill people in relatively small numbers, to weapons like machine guns on up to nuclear weapons, which have the ability to quickly murder hundreds to millions at a time, we will have to modify some of our social norms the way we’ve modified our “war” norms over the past century. We’ll need to modify our personal social contracts so that people can still interact with each other on a direct basis without fear of larger corporations, governments, or institutions aggregating our data, processing it, and then using it against us in ways which unduly benefit them and tremendously disadvantage us as individuals, groups, or even at the level of entire societies.

In my mind, we need to protect the social glue that holds society together and improves our lives while not allowing the mass destruction of the fabric of society by large groups based on their ability to aggregate, process, and use our own data against us.

Thank you Sebastian for kicking off a broader conversation!

Disclaimer: I’m aware that in posting this to my own site that it will trigger a tacit webmention which will ping Sebastian Greger’s website. I give him permission to display any and all data he chooses from the originating web page in perpetuity, or until such time as I send a webmention either modifying or deleting the content of the originating page. I say this all with some jest, while I am really relying on the past twenty years of general social norms built up on the internet and in general society as well as the current practices of the IndieWeb movement to govern what he does with this content.

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