Bookmarked On the Origin of Species: The Preservation of Favoured Traces by Ben Fry (benfry.com)
We often think of scientific ideas, such as Darwin's theory of evolution, as fixed notions that are accepted as finished. In fact, Darwin's On the Origin of Species evolved over the course of several editions he wrote, edited, and updated during his lifetime. The first English edition was approximately 150,000 words and the sixth is a much larger 190,000 words. In the changes are refinements and shifts in ideas — whether increasing the weight of a statement, adding details, or even a change in the idea itself.
What a spectacular visualization of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species.

Published by

Chris Aldrich

I'm a biomedical and electrical engineer with interests in information theory, complexity, evolution, genetics, signal processing, IndieWeb, theoretical mathematics, and big history. I'm also a talent manager-producer-publisher in the entertainment industry with expertise in representation, distribution, finance, production, content delivery, and new media.

4 thoughts on “”

  1. @chrisaldrich Bookmarked for my weekend reading, thanks. My current book contains a chapter on how Darwin’s theory evolved during the 20 years he spent researching it prior to publication. I also mention how he kept tweaking it in later editions (not always for the better). Like Darwin, I’m also an incorrigible tweaker, so am keeping lists of stuff I might want to refer to in later drafts.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.