Reply to Release Version 2.0 of Micropub plugin · Issue #150 · snarfed/wordpress-micropub

Replied to Release Version 2.0 of Micropub plugin · Issue #150 · snarfed/wordpress-micropub (GitHub)
Version 2.0 is merely the name I'm using for all the changes thus far. Since I have decided I'm not going to pursue any further enhancements before releasing a new version, using this issue to track anything left to do before releasing this version as stable.

Micropub errors for OYS 8-25-18 (using master branch from 2018-08-24 ef76125)

[25-Aug-2018 18:42:04 UTC] Micropub Error: 403 forbidden - Unauthorized
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:04 UTC] REST request: /micropub/1.0/endpoint: {"type":["h-entry"],"properties":{"published":["2018-08-24T17:44:13-07:00"],"syndication":["https:\/\/www.swarmapp.com\/user\/11479\/checkin\/5b80a65de0c0c9002c0c8589"],"content":["Being lazy for dinner tonight."],"photo":["https:\/\/igx.4sqi.net\/img\/general\/original\/11479_Z5VSLqOla8M3LhlRo_7QKUXeiGvaufQM1NTUYg32Dp0.jpg"],"checkin":[{"type":["h-card"],"properties":{"name":["Gerrish Grill"],"url":["https:\/\/foursquare.com\/v\/5b66159f2db4a9002ce66d2b"],"latitude":[34.1745],"longitude":[-118.09457],"locality":["Pasadena"],"region":["CA"],"country-name":["United States"],"postal-code":["91107"]},"value":"https:\/\/foursquare.com\/v\/5b66159f2db4a9002ce66d2b"}],"location":[{"type":["h-adr"],"properties":{"latitude":[34.1745],"longitude":[-118.09457],"locality":["Pasadena"],"region":["CA"],"country-name":["United States"],"postal-code":["91107"]}}]}}(Header Absent)
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:04 UTC] REST result: /micropub/1.0/endpoint: {"error":"forbidden","error_description":"Unauthorized"}(403) - null(User ID: 0)
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:04 UTC] PHP Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /htdocs/wp-includes/rest-api/class-wp-rest-server.php on line 1259
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:08 UTC] PHP Notice: Array to string conversion in /htdocs/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 1045
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:08 UTC] PHP Notice: Array to string conversion in /htdocs/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 1045
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:08 UTC] PHP Notice: Array to string conversion in /htdocs/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 1045
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:09 UTC] PHP Notice: Array to string conversion in /htdocs//wp-includes/formatting.php on line 1045
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:12 UTC] PHP Notice: Array to string conversion in /htdocs/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 1045
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:12 UTC] PHP Notice: Array to string conversion in /htdocs/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 1045
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:14 UTC] http://nominatim.openstreetmap.org/reverse?format=json&extratags=1&addressdetails=1&lat=45.53548&lon=-122.621244&zoom=18&accept-language=en-US
[25-Aug-2018 18:42:15 UTC] http://nominatim.openstreetmap.org/reverse?format=json&extratags=1&addressdetails=1&lat=45.53548&lon=-122.621244&zoom=18&accept-language=en-US

Syndicated copies to:
Replied to a tweet by Kevin Marks (Twitter)

Then a few years earlier, Weimar era cinema also includes Der Golem (1915), The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), and later with influences from Louise Brooks lensed through the influential La Invencion De Morel (1940) by Adolfo Caesares.

One of the additional early contemporaneous cultural influences to these that I can think of is the 1917 version of Cleopatra.

Film poster for Der Golem (1915)
Theda Bara in Cleopatra (1917)
Film poster from The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)
Film poster for Die Buchse der Pandora (1929) starring Louise Brooks
La Invencion de Morel by Adolfo Caesares

👓 Google Sheets Blogging CMS, part 1 | John A. Stewart

Replied to Google Sheets Blogging CMS, part 1 by John StewartJohn Stewart (John Stewart)
This is the first post in a three part series on using Google Sheets as the database for a blogging CMS. In this post, I’ll explain the motivations for building the system. In the second post, I’ll walk you through the Google Sheet itself and the Google scripts (their version of js) that drive it. In the third post, I’ll share the website that displays the blog, and the code behind it. My guess is that interest in the three pieces will vary for different audiences, so I wanted to encapsulate the descriptions.

I generally like where John is taking this idea and the fact that he’s actively experimenting and documenting what he’s coming up with as potential solutions. While I do like some of the low-tech angle that he’s taking, I’m not sure, based on what he’s written, how some of it will come out within the broader spectrum of DoOO or IndieWeb-related technologies.

For example:

  • How easy/hard will it be for students to own/export their data after the class?
  • How might they interact if they’re already within the DoOO cohort or already self-hosting  their own space?
  • What are the implications for students of maintaining multiple spaces with a variety of technologies and therefor overhead?
  • I’ve never had a lot of luck with Disqus, which I find to be heavy and often has problems with auto-marking all of my content as spam. I’ve definitely found it to be an issue with using for POSSE workflows. Worse, with the introduction of specifications like Webmention to the DoOO space, students could be writing their responses to classmates and teachers on their own sites and thereby owning all of that content too, but with Disqus, this just isn’t possible.

I’ll reserve judgement for once I’ve seen some of the code and further ideas in parts II and III as I suspect he’s likely taken some of these issues into account.

We’ve played with this concept of front-end blogging for a while now. Alan Levine has built an open sourced tool called TRU Writer that even provides this type of front end interface on a WordPress site.  

I’m curious if John, Alan Levine, or others have yet come across the concept of Micropub? It generalizes the idea of a posting client and interface so that it could work with almost any CMS-related back end. I could see people building custom micropub clients for the education space, or even using some of the pre-existing ones like Quill, InkStone, or Micropublish.net. Many of them also use JSON or form encoded data that they could also be using with platforms like the one John describes here. The other nice part about them is that they’re flexible and relatively open in more ways than one, so they don’t necessarily need to be rebuilt from scratch for each new CMS out there.

Syndicated copies to:

Damn straight DiSo is back.

Replied to a tweet by Chris MessinaChris Messina (Twitter)

Sounds like @steveivy is in:

Damn straight DiSo is back.

I suspect we could get @kevinmarks to be the tour manager:

#DiSo #DiSo10thReunion #DiSoReunionTour2018 #IsRingoAvailableToo?#CanIBeARoadie?

Syndicated copies to:

A reply to David Shanske regarding implementation of the DiSo Project

Replied to a post by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (David Shanske)

People continued working on it. Everything you need using W3C standards like Webmention, Microformats2…give it a try? https://IndieWeb.org/WordPress/Plugins

I suspect that @chrismessina could do it quickly, but for those who’d like to leave Twitter for #WordPress with similar functionality (but greater flexibility and independence), I recorded a 2 hour video for an #IndieWeb set up/walk through with some high level discussion a few months back. If you can do the 5 minute install, hopefully most of the rest is downhill with some basic plugin installation and minor configuration. The end of the walk through includes a live demonstration of a conversation between a WordPress site on one domain and a WithKnown site running on another domain.

tl;dr for the video:

Additional pieces are discussed on my IndieWeb Research Page (focusing mostly on WordPress), in addition to IWC getting started on WordPress wiki page. If you need help, hop into the IndieWeb WordPress chat.

For those watching this carefully, you’ll notice that I’ve replied to David Shanske’s post on his website using my own website and sent him a webmention which will allow him to display my reply (if he chooses). I’ve also automatically syndicated my response to the copy of his reply on Twitter which includes others who are following the conversation there. Both he and I have full copies of the conversation on our own site and originated our responses from our own websites. If you like, retweet, or comment on the copy of this post on Twitter, through the magic of Brid.gy and the Webmention spec, it will come back to the comment section on my original post (after moderation).

Hooray for web standards! And hooray for everyone in the IndieWeb who are helping to make this type of social interaction easier and simpler with every passing day.

Syndicated copies to:

Reply to Kartik Singhal about Webmention

Replied to a tweet by Kartik SinghalKartik Singhal (Twitter)

Let me know if you need help finding resources. I see you have a Hugo site and I’m pretty sure someone has set it up for Webmention use before. https://indieweb.org/Hugo

Reply to Matt McManus on Lost Infrastructure

Replied to a tweet by Matt McManusMatt McManus (Twitter)

Some have framed it as just that! Here’s a handy chart:

A chart of the internet’s lost infrastructure. See the original at the IndieWeb wiki.
Syndicated copies to:

Reply to Mariko Kosaka on RSS, blogging, and linkbacks

Replied to a tweet by Mariko KosakaMariko Kosaka (Twitter)

Webmention is the more modern specification now as some have mentioned. I wrote a piece on it in @alistapart recently which includes some background, UI examples, and links to more technical resources:
https://alistapart.com/article/webmentions-enabling-better-communication-on-the-internet

It is a small part of an #IndieWeb suite of open protocols including Micropub, WebSub, and Microsub for allowing site to site communication and interaction which goes to the broader scope of your question about RSS feeds and blogs. See also: Lost Infrastructure

I keep meaning to provide a better overview of it all, but this recent pencast overview captures a chunk of it. Aaron Parecki’s article Building an IndieWeb Reader captures some of the rest of the microsub/reader portion.

 

Syndicated copies to:

Reply to Curtis McHale and David Wolfpaw on rel-alternate

Replied to a tweet by DΛVID V3.0.6DΛVID V3.0.6 (Twitter)

The conversation started in the IndieWeb Chat last week with:
15:27 aaronpk: “my post permalinks now have a rel=alternate link to an mf2 and jf2 JSON version of the post”

And continued over the next several hours and days primarily with participation of aaronpk, GWG, and pfefferle among a few others.

David Shanske (GWG) and I discussed an overview of it in the most recent episode of An IndieWeb Podcast. The conversation about rel=”alternate” begins at the 11:00 minute mark.

Somewhere there’s a note that GWG has already built a big chunk of code into the Webmention/Semantic Linkbacks plugin that implements a large chunk of the work already. There’s also some work done in https://github.com/indieweb/wordpress-mf2-feed as well.

Syndicated copies to:

Reply to Kat about daily ponderance

Replied to Daily Ponderance: July 30, 2018 by Kat DiClementeKat DiClemente (kasem-beg.com)
Images then & now, that represents how I feel about this class…

I like the ideas of some of these images. Even more interesting to me than the ponderance itself is that Kat has gotten the start of an h-card up on her website! I can see her name and photo now! She’s got a bit more human understandable identity.

This also means that when we use Post Kinds to reply to her, the built-in parser will find her name and photo automatically.

I do notice that it’s missing picking up her website URL properly. I suspect it’s because she left her user profile’s Website field (located at http://kasem-beg.com/wp-admin/profile.php#url) empty.

Reply to dailyponderance on public reading

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION)

Today’s #dailyponderance comes from us via Cheri Who read about @hypothesis in @chrisaldrich’s last #dailyponderance post. Your point to ponder what does public reading mean? Does performative nature come into play?

Join the private group Cheri created, annotate @zephoria’s first two chapters as you read, then post a reflection about the reading

I suspect that my definition of public reading is quite different than most because I’ve been actively doing it for over a year or so now. I post nearly everything I read onto my personal website, and quite often with my notes, highlights, annotations, and some brief analysis. Rarely, if ever, do people react or interact with it, though on occasion it will spark a nice, albiet short discussion. In some part, I post all of it for my own personal consumption and later search, though perhaps one day someone will come across something and it will light a bigger fire. Who knows?

It all reminds me of something my friend P.M. Forni once told me about his own writing as a scholar of the early Italian Renaissance. He said he thought it was sad that only about eleven people would ever read any of his academic writing at a very deep level, but he was far more gratified to be able to write prescriptive books on the area of civility and living a better life that were featured on Oprah and had readers in the millions. I’m happy to write on these topics and have no readers–besides myself–whatsoever.

Of course all of this to say, that as educators we still ought to provide relatively safe spaces for students to try on ideas, make arguments, and see what comes of it without damaging them in the long run.

I’ve read many online documents that have been annotated by many others, most of them in the early days of Genius.com when it was known as Rap Genius. It has been a while, however, since I’ve read something like boyd’s It’s Complicated with so many annotations by others. It is quite refreshing to see a relatively high level of work and commentary on a piece (compared to the typical dreck that one can find in most online newspapers’ comments sections.)  I suspect that for some performative nature may come into play, but I find this less of a factor on more scholarly facing platforms like Hypothesis (compared to Genius.com or Twitter). Certainly one can get caught up in the idea of becoming famous or popular for their commentary.

As boyd points out in the introduction to her book, this sort of thing seems to be common human nature:

None of the videos they made were of especially high quality, and while they shared them publicly on YouTube, only their friends watched them. Still, whenever they got an additional view—even if only because they forced a friend to watch the video—they got excited.

In the end, some of it may come down to audience. For whom are you writing, annotating, or working?  The vast majority of the time, I’m writing and documenting for myself. Anyone else that stumbles upon the conversation may hopefully only make it more interesting, but as often as not, except for an occasional class no one notices–and even then they may not publicly comment.

As for boyd’s book, I’m somewhat less than impressed. I’m aware of much of her work and appreciate the role she plays in the broader public conversation, but I’ve been far too close to the topic she’s writing about for far too long. I view it in a somewhat more historical framework and slightly different viewpoint than she. As a result, she’s not telling me much I didn’t already know or haven’t thought about for quite  a while. I suspect that my commentary in my annotations may make this a bit more clear.

Reply to Greg McVerry on Memes as Lazy Metaphors

Replied to Memes as Lazy Metaphors by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
You could choose any picture in the world to represent you and you chose a meme… Day One We started off our #dailyponderances in #EDU522 thinking visually. Each person was asked to post a picture that represented how you felt. The funny memes flooded in I laughed, but I also grasped how frustrated...

As I’ve been reflecting on this further, it does dawn on me that on day one or two of the course many of us had probably just read the Schedule of Assignments/Workflow page of the course site, which also carries the title How The Sausage is Made.

Perhaps we all went to meme-speak because you had subtly primed us to go there? You could try a nice experiment when you teach this course again…

 

 

👓 #EDU522 Week Two Update | Greg McVerry

Replied to #EDU522 Week Two Update #literacies #doo #edtechchat by Greg Mcverry (jgregorymcverry.com)

You are right Miguel!

This is awesome. What might otherwise be a relatively dull update is suddenly awesome and entertaining to watch. I may lose the month to playing around with Plotagon now.

I do wish they had a way to do embeds directly though. The iframe isn’t the best and I suspect is doing wonky things for the page, though at least it’s viewable. Perhaps using the page’s .mp4 with <video> tags?

Syndicated copies to:

Reply to Remi Kalir on IndieWeb technology for online pedagogy

Replied to a tweet by Remi KalirRemi Kalir (Twitter)

For a bit more context on this, perhaps start here: IndieWeb technology for online pedagogy.

Syndicated copies to:

A reply to Greg McVerry on custom RSS feeds

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION)
Looking at these templates may help in quest for custom rss feeds.

If it helps, I was just digging into something like that last week. They’re a bit more tutorial/step-by-step than delving into raw code, but relatively workable for creating custom feeds.