🔖 Student Privacy Syllabus Statement Project

Bookmarked Student Privacy Syllabus Statement Project (pad.riseup.net)
The following document is an in-progress draft of a statement that might be included with a syllabus to help raise student awareness about controversial data collection practices carried out in many of the technologies they use for learning. Though we cannot always change, fully understand, or opt out of these practices, we feel that ignoring their presence contributes to the broader helplessness in confronting the mass exploitation of personal data at large. This is meant to be a template statement that a professor could revise for inclusion in the syllabus, regardless of the subject matter of the course. We recognize that some power dynamics may not allow for such a statement and that each person should decide for themselves if such a statement in their syllabus is possibile considering their context. If anything we feel the idea of such a statement makes for an excellent thought experiment to address questions of the use of problematic collection and use of student data and to develop conversation around these issues. This draft was started by Autumm Caines and Erin Rose Glass and then opened to group comments during their "Architecture of Student Privacy" workshop during the Domains 2019 conference. We are now soliciting further comments in order to create a template for circulation and plan to write up the process for publication.

Hat tip:

👓 A Reading List for Ralph Northam | The Atlantic

Read A Reading List for Ralph Northam by Ibram X. KendiIbram X. Kendi (The Atlantic)
If he won’t step down, the governor will need this anti-racist syllabus.

The sad part is that there needs to be a Ralph Northam story for people to potentially be interested in reading an article like this much less consume some of the reading list he kindly provides. I’ve started Kendi’s book myself and have to say it’s quite enlightening with lots of history that’s not commonly taught in most high school or college curricula.

For those without as much reading time there’s also the excellent Seeing White podcast that folks might appreciate.