Hypothes.is doesn’t have a social media-like follow functionality baked into the system, but there are a few methods to follow interesting people. My favorite, and possibly the simplest, is to add https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=abcxyz as a feed into my feed reader where abcxyz is the username of the person I’d like to follow.

So to subscribe to my Hypothes.is feed you’d add https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=chrisaldrich to your reader.

Of course, the catch then is to find/discover interesting people to follow this way. Besides some of the usual interesting subjects like Jon Udell, Jeremy Dean, Remi Kalir, et al. Who else should I be following?

Ideally by following interesting readers, you’ll find not only good things to read for yourself, but you’ll also have a good idea which are the best parts as well as what your friends think of those parts. The fact that someone is bothering to highlight or annotate something is a very strong indicator that they’ve got some skin in the game and the article is likely worth reading.

Replied to Misnomer on Twitter (Twitter)

So here are some of my choices:
Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, Ben Kingsley, Joe Pesci, Malcolm McDowell, Bill Duke, J.T. Walsh, Sam Shepard, Wallace Shawn, Chevy Chase, Creed Bratton, Hervé Villechaize, Gary Burghoff, Paul Michael Glaser, Michael Palin, Eric Idle, Mick Jagger, and Keith Richards

If death is on the line, I’ll take the Sicilian!

Replied to a tweet by John StewartJohn Stewart (Twitter)

I bookmarked a great post by Jim Luke (@econproph) a few weeks ago on scale and scope. I suspect that tech’s effect on education is heavily (if not permanently) scale-limited, but scope may be a better avenue going forward.

I also suspect that Cesar Hidalgo’s text Why Information Grows: The Evolution of Order, from Atoms to Economies may provide a strong clue with some details. To some extent I think we’ve generally reached the Shannon limit for how much information we can pour into a single brain. We now need to rely on distributed and parallel networking among people to proceed forward.

📺 "The West Wing" Evidence of Things Not Seen | Netflix

Watched "The West Wing" Evidence of Things Not Seen from Netflix
Directed by Christopher Misiano. With Dulé Hill, Allison Janney, Joshua Malina, Janel Moloney. Trying to participate in a late-night staff poker game proves difficult as news arrives that an unmanned U.S. spy plane has crashed in a remote part of Russia, and Bartlet and Leo have to deal with an incensed Russian President Chagorin and convince him via phone to let the military go in and recover the plane; C.J. obsesses over the fact that on the exact moment of the spring equinox (today), ...

If it helps Domains 2019 attendees, I’ve got a Twitter list of educators, researchers, technologists, and others who are using DoOO, IndieWeb, or other related ethical edTech technologies. The list includes people who attended in 2017, many of those tweeting during 2019, as well as those regularly tweeting about DoOO and closely related topics throughout the year or on the list of Educators in the IndieWeb.

I’ve also got a regularly updated OPML file for many of the same people if you prefer to subscribe to/follow their websites directly (this method is more Domains-friendly right!?!). If you use Inoreader or other services that support OPML subscription technology, this feed will auto-update for you as new people are added to the list, preventing you from needing to regularly refresh the OPML file manually. I’ll try to update this OPML file this evening for today’s/tomorrow’s attendees based on their websites in their Twitter profiles.

Don’t hesitate to ping me if you’d like to be added to the lists, or if I’m missing anyone. Be sure to include your most relevant RSS feed(s) for the OPML portion of that list. Feel free to copy/modify either of the lists to your heart’s content.

Replied to a tweet by Trip Kirkpatrick, MATrip Kirkpatrick, MA (Twitter)

If you want to give it a spin, I’ve always liked Noter Live as a live Tweeting tool at conferences. It automatically includes the hashtag, threads tweets, and saves speakers for easier/quicker writing/posting. When you’re done, it saves your history, so you can cut/paste and save/post it all to your own website (ie, it’s pro-DoOO!)

Open source on GitHub: https://github.com/kevinmarks/noterlive
Instructions: https://github.com/kevinmarks/noterlive/wiki/Noter-Live-Instruction-Manual

Replied to a tweet by Mo PelzelMo Pelzel (Twitter)
“Seeing good examples of existing domains is crucial for showing students what is possible in creating their own domain, says @CassieNooyen #domains19”

This is a lot of the value behind the idea of Homebrew Website Club and even the early blogosphere. Seeing interesting/useful things others have is likely to make you want that thing too.

Replied to a tweet by Kathleen FitzpatrickKathleen Fitzpatrick (Twitter)

The premise behind your post would make an incredibly valuable conference session at the upcoming IndieWeb Summit. Any chance you’re attending (in person or remotely)? We need your ideas.

Thanks for bringing them up!