📺 "The Five" Episode #1.6 | Netflix

Watched "The Five" Episode #1.6 from Netflix
Directed by Mark Tonderai. With Victoria Myers, Alexa Davies, Hannah Arterton, Martin McCreadie. Mark is left stunned when he realises what Laura's husband has been up to and Slade later reveals a dark and disturbing secret. Elsewhere, Danny makes a breakthrough in the case but he is forced to question his own part in Jesse's disappearance when his dad Ray gives him a few home truths.

An exciting episode to be sure, but it feels like they’ve wrapped up so much, what are they going to do for the remaining four episodes? I’m also not quite sure I like the way they’ve so heavily dovetailed characters and plot here. I’m going to be dragging in the morning now.

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📺 "The Five" Episode #1.5 | Netflix

Watched "The Five" Episode #1.5 from Netflix
Directed by Mark Tonderai. With Sophia La Porta, Lee Ingleby, Tom Cullen, Sarah Solemani. Danny insists that Mark leave the investigation to the police, but his dogged persistence leads him to unearth another murder scene. At the shelter, Slade's life is turned upside down when he receives devastating news, while Pru starts to question the woman that she has become.

Now the plot is rolling, but I feel like there’s too much going on with such a small cast that it doesn’t feel very natural. It is watchable and interesting though.

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📺 "The Five" Episode #1.3 | Netflix

Watched "The Five" Episode #1.3 from Netflix
Directed by Mark Tonderai. With Kim Allan, Lee Boardman, O-T Fagbenle, Tom Cullen. Danny and Ally make a shocking discovery and wonder just what kind of a man Jesse may have become. Mark discovers his closest friends have been lying to him.

The plot is picking up a bit and I can finally feel like we’re going somewhere. Still feels like there are too many intersecting plots here.

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📺 "The Five" Episode #1.2 | Netflix

Watched "The Five" Episode #1.2 from Netflix
Directed by Mark Tonderai. With Lee Boardman, Jason Griffiths, Kim Allan, Lauren Douglin. Danny brings in a suspect that could lead him to Jesse and calls on Mark for help. But he is shocked when a horrifying new lead lands at his door.

Like the first episode, I’m not sure I’m really getting into this series. Some of the plot is dragging a bit and the storytelling style is a bit “off”.

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📺 "The Five" Episode #1.1 | Netflix

Watched "The Five" Episode #1.1 from Netflix
Directed by Mark Tonderai. With Alfie Bloor, Harry Bloor, Aedan Duckworth, Megan Bradley. In 1995 five year old Jesse Wells disappeared whilst playing with friends including older brother Mark. Twenty years later one of those friends, policeman Danny is investigating a woman's murder and finds Jesse's DNA at the crime scene. He informs Mark, now a lawyer and the other two friends, doctor Pru and Slade, who runs a homeless shelter. Paedophile Jakob Marosi had admitted to killing Jesse ...

The storytelling is a bit off with flashbacks in odd spots. This first episode leaves something to be desired based on what I’ve heard from others who said they were gripped by the series.

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📺 W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro (2018)

Watched W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro (2018) from Netflix
Directed by Shannon Hartman. With W. Kamau Bell. Activist and comedian W. Kamau Bell muses on parenting in the Trump era, "free speech" dustups, woke children's TV and his fear of going off the grid.

More parenting humor than I would have expected, but definitely current and very political. A more tame look at race relations than Chris Rock and others might have provided.

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Reply to Tom Critchlow on feeds

Replied to a post by Tom CritchlowTom Critchlow (tomcritchlow.com)
This is a list of the feeds I'm reading. The page auto-updates every 10 minutes or so. Why? Because we need to resist the hyperfeeds and build our own small feeds in the open

I’m curious how you’re generating your particular feeds. For over a year now I’ve been using a simple bookmarklet system to post what I’m reading, listening to, and watching to my own website and providing it as various feeds (RSS, JSON, and a microformats-based hfeed/h-feed) for others as well as syndicating some of these to other sources. (For the RSS feeds just add /feed/ to the end of the links above. You can also chain them like so http://boffosocko.com/kind/read,listen,watch/ to get multiple feeds at once.)

I wish others were providing this type of data outside of the big silos as well, but it obviously needs to be much simpler.

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Retweet Alan Levine

Reposted a tweet by Alan LevineAlan Levine (Twitter)
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🎵 Yah-Mo Be There by James Ingram

Listened to Yah-Mo Be There by James Ingram from Stand (in the Light)
An R&B song by American singers James Ingram and Michael McDonald. It was written by Ingram, McDonald, Rod Temperton, and producer Quincy Jones. The song originally appeared on Ingram's 1983 album It's Your Night, released on Jones's Qwest Records label. It was released as a single in late 1983, peaking at No. 19 on the U.S. charts in 1984, and No. 44 on the UK charts also in 1984, (the remixed version by John Jellybean Benitez hit No. 12 in the Spring of 1985 in the UK), and has subsequently appeared on several of Ingram and McDonald's greatest hits albums as well as various 1980s compilation albums. The performance earned the duo a 1985 Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. It was one of a series of very successful duets involving Ingram. It also received a nomination for Best R&B Song, losing to "I Feel for You" (Prince).

I was listening to Yacht Rock (channel 70) on Sirius/XM this afternoon. I can’t help but wonder if Yah-Mo is the younger brother to Yahweh?

🎵 Answering Machine by Rupert Holmes

Listened to Answering Machine by Rupert Holmes from Partners In Crime

Listening to Yacht Rock on Sirius/XM I ran across this Holmes track. The modern day image of him makes me wonder that he ever could have been a musician, much less the one who spawned the hit
Escape (The Pina Colada Song). The cover image of his album also makes me wonder what kind of influence the album can only have had on the movie Flashdance? Are these really the photo of the same man?

Reply to Ian O’Bryne on annotations

Replied to a tweet by William Ian O'ByrneWilliam Ian O'Byrne (Twitter)

Ian, thanks for putting together all of these examples. I think my preference is for option three which provides the most context and seems easiest to read and understand. I like the way you’ve incorporated the blue arrow, which makes semantic sense as well.

I’m sure I’ve seen other versions, but Jon Udell has at least one example of some annotations on his own website like yours too.

When it comes to the “conversation” side of what you’re looking for, I think the biggest piece you’re really missing and which some on the Hypothes.is side (except perhaps for Nate who may have a stronger grasp of their value after the recent IndiewWeb Summit) are apt to miss is that Hypothes.is doesn’t support sending webmentions. Presently you’re putting your data out there in a one-sided manner and Hypothes.is isn’t pushing the other side or any of the follow up back to you. As a result it’s operating as a social silo the same way that sites like Facebook and Twitter do. Based on their GitHub repository, I know that they’ve considered webmentions in the past, but apparently it got put on a back burner and hasn’t been revisited.

Ideally they’d want to have webmentions work in two places. It would be great if they could send webmentions of annotations/highlights to the original page itself, so that the site owner is aware that their content is being marked up or used in this manner. This also means that Hypothes.is could be used as a full-blown and simple commenting system as well so that those who aren’t using their own sites to write replies could use Hypothes.is as an alternative. The second thing it might want to do is to send webmentions, particularly for replies, to the original page as well as to any URLs that are mentioned in the comment thread which appears on Hypothes.is. This would mean that you’d want to add the permalink to your post back to the copy you put on Hypothes.is so that you and your website stay in the loop on the entirety of the conversation. In many senses, this is just mirroring what is going on in threaded Twitter conversations that get mirrored back to your WordPress website. [I’ll note that I think I’ve got the last of the moving pieces for this Twitter/WordPress workflow properly linked up in the past week.] Since Twitter doesn’t support webmentions itself, Brid.gy is handling that part for you, but in Hypothes.is’ case you don’t have any of the details coming back for allowing you to display the discussion on your site except by doing so manually. Doing it manually for extended conversations is going to become painful over time.

From an IndieWeb perspective, you’re primarily implementing a PESOS workflow in which you post first on Hypothes.is and then send a copy of it to your own website. Naturally it would be better if you were posting all the details on your own website and using the Hypothes.is API to syndicate your copy there for additional public conversation outside of the readership of your website. Unfortunately building the infrastructure to do this is obviously quite daunting. Since they’ve got an API, you might be able to bootstrap something webmention-like onto it, but for your purposes it would obviously be easier if they had direct webmention support.

It would also be wonderful if Hypothes.is supported the micropub specification as well. Then you could ideally log into the system as your website and any annotations you made could be automatically be published to your website for later storage, display, or other use. In some sense, this is what I’m anticipating by making  explicit standalone annotation and highlight post kinds on my website. In practice, however, like you, I’d prefer to have a read, like, or bookmark-type of post that aggregates all of my highlights, annotations, and marginalia of a particular piece for easier future use as well as the additional context this provides. I suspect that if I had the additional tag within the Hypothesis Aggregator plugin for WordPress that would let me specify the particular URL of an individual article, I would have most of the front side PESOS functionality we’re all looking for. The rest will require either webmention or a lot more work.

I may have mentioned it before, but in case you hadn’t found it I’ve got a handful of posts on annotations, many of which include some Hypothes.is functionality.

Not itemized in that list (yet?) are some experiments I’d done with the Rory Rosenzweig Center’s PressForward plugin for WordPress. It allowed me to use a simple browser bookmarklet to save a webpage’s content to my personal website with a rel=”canonical” tag for the page pointing at the original page. (Here’s a good example.) Because of the way the canonical set up works within Hypothes.is, I noticed that annotations I (and others) made on the original were also mirrored and available on my website as well. In my case, because PressForward was copying the entirety of the article for me, I used the <mark> HTML tag to make the highlights on my page, but with Hypothes.is enabled, it also shows the other public annotations as well. (Use of the title attribute adds some additional functionality when the mark tagged text is hovered over in most browsers.)

In another example, I annotated a copy of one of Audrey Watters’ articles (after she’d disabled the ability for Hypothesis to work on her site, but before she changed the Creative Commons licensing on her website). But here I added my annotations essentially as pull-quotes off to the side and syndicated copies to Hypothes.is by annotating the copy on my website. If you visit Audrey’s original, you’ll see that you cannot enable Hypothesis on it, but if you’re using the Chrome extension it will correctly indicate that there are five annotations on the page (from my alternate copy which indicates hers is the rel=”canonical”).

In any case, thanks again for your examples and documenting your explorations. I suspect as time goes by we’ll find a more IndieWeb-centric method for doing exactly what you’ve got in mind in an even easier fashion. Often doing things manually for a while will help you better define what you want and that will also make automating it later a lot easier.

 

 

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