5 thoughts on “”

  1. @c I think it’s really cool how you have your post kind icons and the context for things like likes and replies set to be part of your feed so everything stays intact when you syndicate to micro.blog. How are you doing that?

  2. @arush I think of things like reads, bookmarks, likes, listens, and favorites as simply bookmarks with some additional semantic meaning. On micro.blog that meaning is added with an appropriate emoji, so typically I’m just adding an emoji to the front of the title (yes, bad IndieWeb practice since these post types really shouldn’t have titles). Micro.blog (and most other feed readers) think they’re longer articles, so it just pulls in the title portion et voilà! And of course if you want to read more about the thing or see my notes, you can click through (though honestly there’s usually only a bit more context and not much else.)

  3. @arush Naturally, I missed the context of your comment/question. On that particular like of Jacky’s post I did it as a titleless post and the standard RSS generated by Post Kinds did all the rest. So in that case it was simple out-of-the-box functionality without any tweaks on my part. From a visual perspective the small sparkline-esque photo of Jacky was way too large, so I’ll have to work out how to fix/improve that.

  4. @c Thanks for this Chris. Regarding titles, adding them ensures that, if someone clicks the link, they can navigate by headings if using a screen reader, and as long as there’s a title there will be a heading. Alternatively we could maybe modify the twentysixteen indieweb forked theme to enclose the time/date/permalink in a heading for the titleless posts, and move ethat to the start of the post so it can be used as a navigation aid. Hmm. Might be something to add to the appropriate page on the wiki re: display of kinds.

  5. @c Just to clarify on the titleless posts, in the silos, the post is prefaced with something to the effect of “*name posted” or went to an event or whatever, followed by the post itself. The contextual information is wrapped in a heading, possibly with a screen reader text class to hide it from everyone else, although I haven’t dug into the markup in a long time. On the indieweb, I think we could do something slightly similar, up to and including the screen reader text class so that, for non-screen reader users, the titleless nature of the post remains.

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