Read Hypothes.is and How it is Changing How We Read Online by Shannon GriffithsShannon Griffiths (essentiallyshannon.blogspot.com)
Hi everybody! Today I just wanted to quickly review an awesome tool called Hypothesis that I've been using all semester for two of my English classes (Currents in American Lit and Critical Theory). As an extension of your web browser (I use Chrome...does anyone not use Chrome?), Hypothesis lets individuals highlight and annotate any online text of their choosing. By allowing (encouraging it, I daresay) people to comment on texts, a sort of community is born and it's truly neat to be involved in.

This blog was written and published by Shannon Griffiths

I notice that this page and the original have two different rel=”canonical” links which means that they have completely different sets of annotations on them. I’m curious if she was given the chance to have them be the same or different as making them the same means that the annotations for each would have been mirrored across rather than having two different sets?
–November 17, 2019 at 12:37AM

HYPOTHESIS

FYI: There’s a second copy of this article on the Hypothes.is blog, but because it has a different “fingerprint” this copy and the copy on the Hypothes.is site have two different sets of annotations.
–November 17, 2019 at 12:45AM

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Chris Aldrich

I'm a biomedical and electrical engineer with interests in information theory, complexity, evolution, genetics, signal processing, IndieWeb, theoretical mathematics, and big history. I'm also a talent manager-producer-publisher in the entertainment industry with expertise in representation, distribution, finance, production, content delivery, and new media.

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