Following Ilyas Khan

Followed Ilyas Khan (LinkedIn)
Ilyas Khan Co-Founder and CEO at Cambridge Quantum Computing

Dear god, I wish Ilyas had a traditional blog with a true feed, but I’m willing to put up with the inconvenience of manually looking him up from time to time to see what he’s writing about quantum mechanics, quantum computing, category theory, and other areas of math.

👓 12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech | Anil Dash

Read 12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech by Anil Dash (Anil Dash)
Tech is more important than ever, deeply affecting culture, politics and society. Given all the time we spend with our gadgets and apps, it’s essential to understand the principles that determine how tech affects our lives.

One of the more important things I’ve read in the past month. This short article should be required reading for every lawmaker in the land (and everyone else for that matter). Thanks Anil!

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Why Are Newspaper Websites So Horrible? | City Lab

Read Why Are Newspaper Websites So Horrible? by Andrew Zaleski (CityLab)
Blame Google, for a start.

Nothing great or new here. Also no real solutions, though knowing some of the history and the problems, does help suggest possible solutions.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Perspective | Trump lied to me about his wealth to get onto the Forbes 400. Here are the tapes. | Washington Post

Read Perspective | Trump lied to me about his wealth to get onto the Forbes 400. Here are the tapes. by Jonathan Greenberg (Washington Post)
Posing as ‘John Barron,’ he claimed he owned most of his father’s real estate empire.

A liar to create perceptions about himself for decades and decades…

Syndicated copies to:

Following Lost Notes from KCRW

Followed Lost Notes (KCRW)

An anthology of some of the greatest music stories never truly told.

This eight-part series includes a look at the FBI investigation into a classic rock anthem, unheard conversations with Captain Beefheart, a critical examination of New Edition’s basketball connection and the chronicle of a man plucked from Folsom Prison by Johnny Cash and thrust into country music stardom.

h/t Kevin Smokler

Following Doug Belshaw

Followed Doug Belshaw (Open Educational Thinkering)

I’m Doug Belshaw, Open Educational Thinkerer. I help people become more productive in their use of technology.

Recently, I’ve joined Moodle to lead an innovation project currently entitled Project MoodleNet. From January 2018 this takes up four days, or 30 hours, of my working week.

I’m also a consultant through Dynamic Skillset, where I help people and organisations become more productive in their use of technology, and I co-founded a co-operative known as We Are Open which exists to spread the culture, processes, and benefits of working openly.

In previous guises I’ve worked for Mozilla and Jisc, and before that was a teacher and senior leader in schools.

I write here mainly about education, technology and productivity. Other places I write include discours.es (commentary), literaci.es (new literacies-related), and ambiguiti.es (more philosophical).

I’m following him via his own website, since he’s “off Twitter” and primarily publishing in his own space:

For others I’m following in Open Education: http://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Open+Education

Syndicated copies to:

Following Song Exploder

Followed Song Exploder (Song Exploder)

Song Exploder is a podcast where musicians take apart their songs, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made.

Each episode is produced and edited by host and creator Hrishikesh Hirway in Los Angeles. Using the isolated, individual tracks from a recording, Hrishikesh asks artists to delve into the specific decisions that went into creating their work. Hrishikesh edits the interviews, removing his side of the conversation and condensing the story to be tightly focused on how the artists brought their songs to life. Guests include Björk, U2, Metallica, Solange, and over a hundred more. Full list of episodes.

Song Exploder is an independent podcast, and a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Learn more at radiotopia.fm.

The team:
Hrishikesh Hirway, Host and Producer
Christian Koons, Assistant Producer
Carlos Lerma, Illustrator

Syndicated copies to:

Following Clevercast

Followed clevercast by Jonathan LaCourJonathan LaCour (cleverca.st)

Hello, there! My name is Jonathan LaCour, and this is “clevercast,” my microcast. A microcast is a short form podcast that is published on a regular basis. Topics for this microcast range broadly, but its mostly about my life as a technologist, and will include:

To learn more about me, you should visit my website, where I post photos, articles, microblog posts, recipes, and more.

I’ve been following the inimitable Jonathan LaCour for quite a while, but I’ve just discovered the link to his new microcast which I’m immediately adding to the growing list of interesting microcasts I’m following.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Why I Love Link Blogging | BirchTree

Read Why I Love Link Blogging (BirchTree)
More often than not, I write articles for this site after reading something someone else wrote. I browse the web for articles and tweets that I find interesting, and the ones that make me think are very often the ones that inspire me to write something myself. This leads to a funny situation as a w...

How many levels deep could the link blogging on these posts go? Is it linkblogging all the way down?

For me, I’ll add it specifically to my linkblog of things I’ve read which is a subsection of my collected linkblog which also collects favorites, likes, bookmarks, and sites I’m following.

Incidentally, this seems to be another post about people who use their websites for thinking and writing, which I seem to be coming across many of lately. I ought to collect them all into a group and write a piece about them and the general phenomenon.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 WebAuthn: A Developer’s Guide to What’s on the Horizon | Okta Developer

Read WebAuthn: A Developer's Guide to What's on the Horizon by Aaron Parecki (developer.okta.com)
WebAuthn (the Web Authentication API) allows browsers to make use of hardware authenticators such as the Yubikey or a mobile phone's biometrics like a thumbprint reader or facial recognition.

I’ve been interested to see Aaron’s opinion of this when I saw it come across my radar the other day. Glad to have a simple overview of it’s functionality now, particularly from someone who’s literally written the book on authentication.

Syndicated copies to:

👓 Wrapping My Head Around Micro.blog and IndieWeb | Jason Sadler

Read Wrapping My Head Around Micro.blog and IndieWeb by Jason Sadler (sadlerjw.com)
After the Facebook / Cambridge Analytica catastrophe and recent Twitter news (and retraction) about support for 3rd party clients, I found myself wondering about Micro.blog again, after hearing about it on Kickstarter a little over a year ago. On the surface, it’s an indie Twitter-like app, in th...
Syndicated copies to:

👓 Cathy Fisher on fixing Fb: Go back to your 2001 fan site | Kimberly Hirsh

Read Cathy Fisher on fixing Fb: Go back to your 2001 fan site by Kimberly HirshKimberly Hirsh (Kimberly Hirsh)
Cathy Fisher, a Business Professional on Twitter (Twitter) “My idea for fixing Facebook: shut down Facebook and everyone goes back to the weird niche fan site forum they were on in 2001, where they then form a really deep friendship with a teen who lives in Poland” This is basically what I’m ...
Syndicated copies to:

👓 Sean Hannity Is Named as Client of Michael Cohen, Trump’s Lawyer | New York Times

Read Sean Hannity Is Named as Client of Michael Cohen, Trump’s Lawyer by Alan Feuer (nytimes.com)
Lawyers for Mr. Cohen, the president’s personal lawyer, had sought to keep Mr. Hannity’s identity a secret in a court challenge of an F.B.I. search of Mr. Cohen’s office.

 

Syndicated copies to:

👓 What Makes a Vowel a Vowel and a Consonant a Consonant | Today I Found Out

Read What Makes a Vowel a Vowel and a Consonant a Consonant by Emily Upton
ou already know that vowels in the English alphabet are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y, while the rest of the letters are called consonants. But did you ever ask yourself why the letters were divided into two separate groups?
Syndicated copies to: