🔖 PHP with MySQL Essential Training: 1 The Basics – Welcome | LinkedIn Learning

Bookmarked PHP with MySQL Essential Training: 1 The Basics - Welcome (LinkedIn Learning)
PHP is a popular programming language and the foundation of many smart, data-driven websites. This comprehensive course from Kevin Skoglund helps developers learn to use PHP to build interconnected webpages with dynamic content which can pass data between pages. Learn how PHP can simplify the creation of forms, read and validate form data, and display errors. Kevin also covers the fundamentals of MySQL and how to use PHP to efficiently and securely interact with a database to store and retrieve data. Throughout the course, he provides practical advice and offers examples of best practices.

Greg, I can’t find it now, but you mentioned something recently (?) about potentially working your way through this course. I’m game to work though it (or something similar) with you if you want to put together a study group…

👓 Stop Learning Frameworks | sizovs.net

Read Stop Learning Frameworks by Eduards SizovsEduards Sizovs (sizovs.net)
We are developers. We need to stay up to date with technology. Every day, we learn programming languages, frameworks, and libraries. The more modern tools we know — the better.

Some interesting advice. Seems like the 80/20 rule might not be a bad approach here.

🔖 The influence of collaboration networks on programming language acquisition by Sanjay Guruprasad | MIT

Bookmarked The influence of collaboration networks on programming language acquisition by Sanjay Guruprasad (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Many behaviors spread through social contact. However, different behaviors seem to require different degrees of social reinforcement to spread within a network. Some behaviors spread via simple contagion, where a single contact with an "activated node" is sufficient for transmission, while others require complex contagion, with reinforcement from multiple nodes to adopt the behavior. But why do some behaviors require more social reinforcement to spread than others? Here we hypothesize that learning more difficult behaviors requires more social reinforcement. We test this hypothesis by analyzing the programming language adoption of hundreds of thousands of programmers on the social coding platform Github. We show that adopting more difficult programming languages requires more reinforcement from the collaboration network. This research sheds light on the role of collaboration networks in programming language acquisition.

[Downloadable .pdf]

Thesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2018.; Cataloged from PDF version of thesis.; Includes bibliographical references (pages 26-28).

Advisor: César Hidalgo.

URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/119085

I ran across this paper via the Human Current interview with Cesar Hidalgo. In general they studied GitHub as a learning community and the social support of people’s friends on the platform as they worked on learning new programming languages.

I think there might be some interesting takeaways for people looking at collective learning and online pedagogies as well as for communities like the IndieWeb which are trying to not only build new technologies, but help to get them into others’ hands by teaching and disseminating some generally tough technical knowledge. (In this respect, the referenced Human Current podcast episode may be a worthwhile overview.)

👓 Programming CSS | Jeremy Keith

Read Programming CSS by Jeremy KeithJeremy Keith (adactio.com)
There’s a worrying tendency for “real” programmers look down their noses at CSS. It’s just a declarative language, they point out, not a fully-featured programming language. Heck, it isn’t even a scripting language.
That may be true, but that doesn’t mean that CSS isn’t powerful. It’s just powerful in different ways to traditional languages.