❤️ dimensionmedia tweeted Armchair WordCampers: Discover #WordPress friends in California w/ @WordCampRS

Liked a tweet by David Bisset on Twitter (Twitter)

❤️ WordCampRS tweeted WordCamp Riverside 2019 Day 2 was jam packed

Liked a tweet by WordCamp Riverside - Nov. 8-10 2019 (@WordCampRS)WordCamp Riverside - Nov. 8-10 2019 (@WordCampRS) (twitter.com)

❤️ WordCampRS tweeted @ChrisAldrich presents on “Welcome to Web 3.0, the internet you always wish you had.” https://t.co/MWjXZv7VXs

Liked a tweet by WordCamp Riverside - Nov. 8-10 2019WordCamp Riverside - Nov. 8-10 2019 (Twitter)

❤️ MinorityPostdoc tweeted at 3rd @WordCampRS Riverside event organized by local Inland Empire community

Liked a tweet by Alberto RocaAlberto Roca (Twitter)

🔖 Integromat – The glue of the internet

Bookmarked Integromat (Integromat)
Integromat is an easy to use, powerful tool with unique features for automating manual processes. Connect your favorite apps, services and devices with each other without having any programming skills.
Checked into Beyond WordPress – easy WP automation and integration with no coding

Sessions after lunch starting a few minutes late.

Sabrina Liao is looking primarily looking at Zapier, Integromat, IFTTT, automate.io.

I use a huge number of automated pieces like these, particularly IFTTT, for driving my own personal online commonplace book.

🔖 Speakers: Round Two | WordCamp Riverside 2019

Bookmarked WordCamp Riverside 2019 Speakers: Round Two by Verious B. Smith III (2019.riverside.wordcamp.org)

This group will join our other speakers for 3 days of sessions on November 8th – 10th. We hope you’ll join us for their sessions. View the Full Schedule Here & Get your ticket today!

WordPress and IndieWeb: Creating Your Dialtone on the Internet

Next weekend, I’ll be giving a talk at the third annual WordCamp Riverside on Saturday, November 9th at 11:00 AM Pacific in the Innovation room. If you haven’t registered already, there are still tickets left for purchase.

After having watched the livestream of Tantek Çelik’s invited talk at WordCamp US entitled Take Back Your Web, I’ll note that my intention is to generally pick up from where he left off and get into some of the nuts and bolts of what some of the IndieWeb philosophies and technologies are and how they work with WordPress. (Though don’t worry if you missed his talk, I’ll put all the ideas into their larger context.) I’ll approach it from the perspective of a WordPress beginner, but will have some pointers to lots of in-depth resources for designers and developers. In short, I’ll attempt to provide a crash-course overview of what the IndieWeb looks like from a WordPress perspective.

Below is a brief teaser for the talk:

Welcome to Web 3.0, the internet you always wish you had.

I can have phone service on Verizon and you may choose to use AT&T, T-Mobile, or Sprint, but as long as we’ve got phones we can talk to each other or any other phone number that’s connected to the network. But why can’t Facebook users interact directly with Twitter users or Instagram users or vice versa? Crucially why couldn’t one website built on WordPress talk to another website built with Drupal or Kirby? The internet is an open communication platform after all! I’m going to show how this (and so much more magic) can all be done with some simple plugins in under an hour!
Over the past several years a group of dedicated bloggers, technologists, and designers has been innovating, building, and testing a suite of open W3C web standards to allow their personal websites to recreate the major pieces of interactive functionality that are part of the largest social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, SoundCloud, etc. These larger pieces are now all working together across dozens of content management systems including WordPress, Drupal, WithKnown, ProcessWire, Elgg, Nucleus CMS, Craft, Django, Kirby, static site generators like Hugo and Jekyll and services like Micro.Blog and Mastodon. This means that instead of relying on smaller non-interoperable social media sites that obsessively surveil you and then pollute your stream with obtrusive ads, you can now better own and control your own data and comprehensive identity on your own domain name. In this talk we’ll take a high level look at W3C web specs including Webmention, WebSub, Micropub, and the forthcoming Microsub to see how you can make your own website a first class citizen on the (social) web. Using WordPress and a few simple plugins you can now close the circle of website-to-website intercommunication across the open web. Use your own website to read and consume web content, post your own status updates, bookmarks, likes, and replies while interacting directly with other websites. In many cases you can also do this with social platforms like Twitter, Instagram, Flickr, GitHub, Mastodon, and Micro.blog.

The web is my social network: My talk from WordCamp Riverside 2018

WordPress.tv has posted my talk from WordCamp Riverside 2018. If you missed it live, you can review it again now. The slides can be found here on my site.


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The web is my social network

Growing toxicity on Twitter, Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, algorithmic feeds, and a myriad of other problems have opened our eyes to the ever-growing costs of social media. Walled gardens have trapped us with the promise of “free” while addicting us to their products at the cost of our happiness, sense of self, sanity, and privacy. Can we take back our fractured online identities, data, and privacy to regain what we’ve lost?
I’ll talk about how I’ve used IndieWeb related technologies in conjunction with WordPress as a replacement for my social presence while still allowing easy interaction with friends, family, and colleagues online. I’ll show how everyone can easily use simple web standards to make WordPress a user-controlled, first-class social platform that works across domains and even other CMSs.
Let’s democratize social media using WordPress and the open web, the last social network you’ll ever need to join.

Micropub and WordPress: Custom Posting Applications My talk from WordCamp Santa Clarita Valley 2019

WordPress.tv has posted my talk from WordCamp Santa Clarita Valley 2019. If you missed it live, you can review it again now. The slides are available for download as well.

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Micropub and WordPress: Custom Posting Applications

April 6, 2019, 3:30 pm Horseshoe Ranch Room, University Center, College of the Canyons — The W3C recommended Micropub specification (2017) allows developers to create custom posting applications for a wide variety of data targeting any content management system that supports the spec.

Chris Aldrich provides an overview of the available plugin and endpoint for WordPress and a variety of client applications like Quill, Teacup, OwnYourGram, OwnYour Swarm, Omnibear, that allow one to post status updates, bookmarks, likes, check-ins/location data, photos, and more directly to WordPress sites.
We’ll also talk about how developers can create custom posting interfaces to drastically simplify content creation and posting for clients in ways that can be even simpler than working with Gutenberg.

I’ve been to a number of WordCamps over the past year, and invariably, in the registration process I’m asked for my Twitter handle and the majority of the time that Twitter handle is printed on my name tag.

Why are we doing this?! It’s not TwitterCamp. It’s a W-O-R-D-C-A-M-P!! Why can’t we ask for and put our own domain names (running WordPress, natch…) in our registration and on our name tags?! Let’s get with the program people… Twitter is nice, but obviously WordPress on a domain name we own and control is far better.

A common sticker-type name tag that is preprinted with the large text "Hello My URL is" with smaller text underneath that reads <a href="  "> and a blank space in the middle where someone has handwritten in pen "photomatt.net"
This is the sort of name tag I’d much rather support!

👓 Call for Speakers – July 25-27, 2019 – Portland, Oregon | WPCampus 2019 Conference: Where WordPress Meets Higher Education

Read Call for speakers - WPCampus 2019 Conference: Where WordPress Meets Higher Education - July 25-27, 2019 - Portland, Oregon (WPCampus )
WPCampus is looking for stories, how-tos, hypotheticals, demos, case studies and more for our fourth annual in-person conference focused on WordPress in higher education.