👓 Why Women, but Not Men, Are Judged for a Messy House | New York Times

Read Why Women, but Not Men, Are Judged for a Messy House (New York Times)
They’re still held to a higher social standard, which explains why they’re doing so much housework, studies show.

👓 Craft beautiful equations in Word with LaTeX | Nature

Read Craft beautiful equations in Word with LaTeX (Nature)
Manufacturers are ditching equation editors in word-processing software in favour of the LaTeX typesetting language. Here’s how to get started.

👓 Domains19 Reflection, Well Really More of A Thanks. | EconProph | Jim Luke

Read Domains19 Reflection, Well Really More of A Thanks. by Jim Luke (EconProph)
I just got back from the Domains19 conference and some thanks and perhaps observations are in order. It was a very interesting, stimulating, and useful conference. Frankly, I’ve come to expec…

👓 Reflections on Domains 19 | John Stewart

Read Reflections on Domains 19 by John StewartJohn Stewart (johnastewart.org)
Domains19 wrapped yesterday, and it was great. Lauren and the whole Reclaim Hosting team did a great job putting the conference together. As with any good conference, my favorite part was getting to catch up with friends and meet people who’s work I’ve been following for a while (I was particularly excited to meet Martin Hawksey and experience Bryan Ollendyke’s bombastic manifesto of a talk).

👓 Curating the Micro.blog Discover Timeline | Jean MacDonald

Read Curating the Micro.blog Discover Timeline by Jean MacDonaldJean MacDonald (micro.welltempered.net)
Micro.blog is a blogging platform with a social engagement component. We have a timeline where you can follow and interact with other bloggers. Sometimes it feels like Twitter, because of the timeline, mentions, and conversations. But there are key differences, built into Micro.blog, to make it a sa...

👓 #Domains19 Reflections | Lee Skallerup Bessette

Read #Domains19 Reflections by Lee Skallerup Bessette (readywriting)
A little more than 4 years ago, I was at #dlrn15 hearing Jim Groom talk about Domain of One's Own, and Eddie Maloney talking the graduate degree they were developing, the one that would become the MA in Learning, Design, and Technology. I was about to start at UMW, and

👓 The Pac-Man Rule at Conferences | Eric Holscher

Read The Pac-Man Rule at Conferences by Eric Holscher (ericholscher.com)

The rule is:

When standing as a group of people, always leave room for 1 person to join your group.

More memorably, stand like Pac-Man!

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The new person, who has been given permission to join your group, will gather up the courage, and join you! Another important point, the group should now readjust to leave another space for a new person.

Leaving room for new people when standing in a group is a physical way to show an inclusive and welcoming environment. It reduces the feeling of there being cliques, and allows people to integrate themselves into the community.

I’ve always instinctively done this at networking events; it’s great to have a good name for it.

Hat tip: Kevin Marks who linked to

👓 Why Elizabeth Warren should be on the open web | Dave Winer

Read Why Elizabeth Warren should be on the open web by Dave Winer (Scripting News)
Why the open web is a better choice for a thoughtful and futuristic campaign like Warren's.

Many of my own thoughts reflected here.

👓 Backfeed without code | Ryan Barrett

Read Backfeed without code by Ryan BarrettRyan Barrett (snarfed.org)
I’ve spent most of my time in the IndieWeb on backfeed: sending interactions from social networks back to your web site. Bridgy, the service we built, has served that need wel...

This sounds like a lovely and simple idea. Definitely worth attempting as a simple method.

👓 Feed Reading By Social Distance | Ton Zijlstra

Read Feed Reading By Social Distance by Ton Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
At the Crafting {:} a Life unconference one of the things that came up in our conversations was how you take information in, while avoiding the endlessly scrolling timelines of FB and Twitter as well as FOMO. My description of how I read feeds ‘by social distance‘ was met with curiosity and ‘c...

Ton’s archives have some more material on this topic, but it’s definitely an interesting way to sort and filter one’s feeds.

👓 The Good Social Internet | Bennett Tomlin

Read The Good Social Internet by Bennett TomlinBennett Tomlin (Bennett's Blog)
Social media often sucks. The social internet is a magical place full of rich relationships, new connections, intriguing ideas, and true community. What do I mean when I say the social internet? It…

Some great little quotes hiding in here:

The simple reason is that the dynamics of most social media are very different from the dynamics of other social internet applications. For one there seems to be a fundamental push vs pull difference in the way that you normally come to view the content.

The internet was on demand, instead of demanding.

👓 Duxtape | Kicks Condor

Read Duxtape by Kicks Condor (Kicks Condor)

While messing with Dat last night, I got carried away in nostalgia and began… recreating Muxtape in Dat. I wanted to see how far I could get. (If you don’t know what Muxtape was—it was a way of sharing mp3 mixtapes online for a brief window of time in 2008, until it was shut down by the grown-ups.)

So, it seemed interesting to try to replicate Muxtape, because it would be very hard to “shut down” on the Dat network. And, sure enough, I was able to get it working quite well: you can upload songs, tweak the colors and titles, order the songs and such—I think this is quite faithful.

And, yes, it’s peer-to-peer. You can edit your tape using the URL created for you. Then you can pass that same URL out to share your tape. Visitors can listen to the music and seed the tape for everyone else.

If you’re interested in seeing what a mix looks like, try: dat://8587f3…aa/. (You’ll need Beaker.)

Source code is here. Inspired by Tara Vancil’s dat-photos-app. Thanks, Tara!

This is an awesome idea. I really wish I had the bandwidth to dig into DAT. Who wouldn’t want to be able to make mixtapes like this for the internet? It’s not too dissimilar to my listen feed (aka faux-cast), but could be more customized and curated for friends/family.

👓 WordPress VIP Go sites are experience outages (yes, us included) | TechCrunch.tumblr.com

Read Wordpress VIP Go sites are experience outages (yes, us included) (TechCrunch)
You might have notice something funny if you visited TechCrunch dot com this morning (aside form the usual dryly hilarious tech commentary, that is). Our site, along with others, was hit by a major...

Fascinating to see TechCrunch is syndicating content to a Tumblr so they’re still “up” during a hosting outage.

👓 To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over | NPR

Read To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over by Nell GreenfieldboyceNell Greenfieldboyce (NPR)
Mike Morrison hardly looks like a revolutionary. He's wearing a dark suit and has short hair. But we're about to enter a world of conformity that hasn't changed in decades — maybe even a century. And in there, his vision seems radical. "We are about to walk into a room full of 100 scientific posters, where researchers are trying to display their findings on a big poster board," says Morrison, a doctoral student in psychology at Michigan State University. The idea of a science poster is simple. Get some poster-making materials and then slap on a title, the experimental methods and the results. Almost everyone has created a poster like this at some point — often in childhood, for a school assignment or a science fair.

I like the idea of this, but most conferences worth their salt also publish short abstracts of most poster presentations which have roughly this type of short overview of poster presentations. Prepared researchers will have scanned through them all and highlighted a dozen or so they want to stop by to see more about or meet the researchers.

Of course, all this to say that this method isn’t a potential improvement for the lazy drive-by poster visitor.