Reply to Laying the Standards for a Blogging Renaissance by Aaron Davis

Replied to Laying the Standards for a Blogging Renaissance by Aaron Davis (Read Write Respond)
With the potential demise of social media, does this offer a possible rebirth of blogging communities and the standards they are built upon?
Aaron, some excellent thoughts and pointers. A lot of your post also reminds me of Bryan Alexander's relatively recent post I defy the world and to go back to RSS. I completely get the concept of what you're getting at with harkening back to the halcyon days of RSS. I certainly love, use, and rely…

Reply toMeredith Fierro on Setting up a Feed with Feedly

Replied to Setting up a Feed with Feedly by Meredith Fierro (Meredith Fierro)
Working at Reclaim means I get to interact with people who do incredible work within the Ed Tech community. I was first exposed to this at #​​domains17 and I remember thinking that I wanted to keep up with all of these wonderful folks and the work their doing. At first, I had no idea how I could keep up with all the blog posts except through twitter. I didn’t really like that idea though because I could lose tweets within my feed. I wanted a place where I could keep them all together. I don’t know too much about RSS feeds but I knew that’s where I needed to start. I a little bit of experience using FeedWordPress to syndicate blog posts to the main class hub but I knew that would chew right through my storage limit.
If you want to take it a step further, you could consider making an open OPML file of the people you're following from a conference like Domains '17. Much like Twitter lists, these are sharable (so others don't need to build them by hand), or more importantly for Feedly importable! Some RSS readers will also…

Reply to I defy the world and go back to RSS by Bryan Alexander

Replied to I defy the world and go back to RSS by Bryan Alexander (bryanalexander.org)
It may be perverse, but in this age of Facebook (now 2 billion strong) I’ve decided to rededicate myself to RSS reading. That’s right: old school, Web 2.0 style. Why? A big reason is that Facebook’s front page is so, so massively unreliable. Despite having huge numbers of people that are my friends, clients, and contacts, it’s just not a good reading and writing service. Facebook’s black box algorithm(s) may or may not present a given’s user’s post for reasons generally inscrutable. I’ve missed friends’ news about new jobs, divorces, and deaths because the Zuckerbergmachine deems them unworthy of inclusion in my personalized river of news. In turn, I have little sense of who will see my posts, so it’s hard to get responses and very hard to pitch my writing for an intended audience. Together, this makes the FB experience sketchy at best. To improve our use of it we have to turn to experiments and research that remind me of Cold War Kremlinology.
Bryan, so much of what you're saying is not only not backwards, but truly awesome and inspiring, and not just with respect to RSS. I've lately become more enamored of not only RSS, but new methods for feeds including lighter weight versions like microformats h-feeds. A few months ago I was inspired to embed the…

The beginnings of a blogroll

Inspired by Richard MacManus' recent post, I spent a little bit of time rebuilding/refreshing some old blogroll functionality (cum follow list functionality) into my site. It's far from finished (particularly from the data perspective), but it's starting to shape up and look like something. I'm currently publishing an Indieweb blogroll on my front page. (Don't…

Favorite Things

Some might consider this a "/uses" page, a "Using" page, a "Recommendations page" or something equivalent. Simply put, it's a list of the tools and things I find incredibly useful and intriguing. Most of them are things I either use on a daily basis or couldn't get along without. They're things I love and have…