Annotated An Outline for Using Hypothesis for Owning your Annotations and Highlights by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (boffosocko.com)

Create an IFTTT.com recipe to port your Hypothesis RSS feed into WordPress posts. Generally chose an “If RSS, then WordPress” setup and use the following data to build the recipe:

Input feed: https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=username (change username to your user name)
Optional title: {{EntryTitle}}
Body: {{EntryContent}} from {{EntryUrl}}
{{EntryPublished}}

Categories: Highlight (use whatever categories you prefer, but be aware they’ll apply to all your future posts from this feed)
Tags: hypothes.is
Post status (optional): I set mine to “Draft” so I have the option to keep it privately or to publish it publicly at a later date.

Posting this solely to compare my Hypothes.is highlights and annotations on my website with Will’s version.

I’m still tinkering with mine and should have a Micropub based version using IFTTT and Webhooks done soon.

Replied to a tweet by Hungry Bread ElevatorHungry Bread Elevator (Twitter)
Some of the off-label uses of Hypothes.is have been enumerated lately, including some I’ve mentioned.

I’ve tinkered a bit with CROWDLAAERS, but it’s always seemed to me geared toward a very niche audience including teachers potentially using it for grading? Perhaps I’m missing some more of its flexibility? Remi Kalir might be able to help elucidate it or indicate if he’s noticed anyone using it for off-label usage.

I might see it being more useful if one could analyze site-wide annotations on a domain with a wild-card search of this sort: https://tomcritchlow.com/*.

I have to imagine that it would be cool to see all the annotations and conversations across something like the New York Times with a data visualization tool like this.

Jon Udell and gang are aware of Webmention, but haven’t pulled the trigger (yet) on making the decision to build them in. I’ve outlined some methods for making their platform a bit more IndieWeb friendly by adding markup and some additional HTML to allow people to force the system to be able to send webmentions. I do frequently use Jon’s facet tool to check highlighting and annotation activity on my website.

I have found Crowdlaaers useful several times in that I’m aware that some pages are annotated, but they’re either not public or are part of other groups for which I’m not a member. An example of this is this page on my website which has one annotation which I can’t see, but by using Crowdlaaers, I can. Another example is viewing annotations on sites that have subsequently blocked Hypothes.is like this example. Of course, sometimes you’ll do this and find odd bugs floating around in the system.

 

Read about CROWDLAAERS (crowdlaaers.org)
Welcome to the “Crowd Layers” dashboard, a public service for ​Capturing and Reporting Open Web Data for Learning Analytics, Annotation, and Education Researchers ​(CROWDLAAERS). This real-time dashboard visualizes group – or ​crowd​ – discourse ​layers​ added via Hypothesis open web annotation to online documents. Developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Denver, CROWDLAAERS visualizes social learning analytics associated with open and collaborative web annotation. The dashboard has been iteratively designed in partnership with educators and researchers to support the social life of reading and the social life of documents across the open and annotated web.
Read Hypothesis for Web Developers by Jon Udell (Hypothesis)
We’ve written a lot here about Hypothesis for teachers and students, for publishers, for fact checkers, for reviewers and curators of scholarly literature, and for any individual or team that gathers and organizes pieces of web content. One constituency we haven’t addressed, though, is web developers. Annotation enlarges the web’s surface area. Formerly we could locate resources identified by billions of URLs. Now we can also locate segments defined within those billions of resources. It was already true that the emergent properties of the URL-addressable web continued to surprise me on a regular basis. Nowadays annotation delivers even more delightful surprises. Here’s the latest one, and it’s a real mind-expander.
Replied to a tweet by Dr. Ryan StraightDr. Ryan Straight (Twitter)
What a great prompt! Here are a few interesting off-label use cases I’ve used, imagined, or seen in the wild:

Greg McVerry, Ian O’Byrne, and I have integrated Hypothes.is into our digital/online commonplace books in different ways. Greg’s are embedded at https://jgregorymcverry.com/annotations, Ian discusses his process on his site, while mine show up as annotation or highlight posts.

I’ve not published the full idea yet, but I’ve spent some time contemplating using Hypothes.is as a blogging platform/CMS. It might require a bit of flexibility, but it generally has reasonable support for:

  • Writing posts with a reasonably full-featured text editor and the ability to edit and delete posts later;
  • HTML and markdown support;
  • Public and private posting as well as sharing content with other private groups;
  • The ability to reply to other websites;
  • The ability for others to comment on your posts natively;
  • A robust tagging functionality;
  • The ability to socially bookmark web pages (blank page notes);
  • An RSS feed;
  • The ability to share posts to other social platforms including meta data for Twitter cards;
  • Naturally, it’s very easy to use for writing short notes, creating highlights and annotations, and keeping track of what you’ve read;
  • It has a pseudo-social media functionality in that your public posts appear on a global timeline where people can read and interact with them.
  • It’s also opensource, so you can self-host, modify it, or add new features.

I have been personally using Hypothes.is to follow the public feed, several tag feeds, and several friends’ specific feeds as a discovery tool for finding interesting content to read.

And a final off-label use case that could be compelling, but which could have some better UI and integration would be to use Hypothes.is as an embeddable commenting system for one’s own website. It has in-line commenting in much the same way that Medium does, but the entire thing could likely be embedded into a comment section under a traditional blog post and be used in much the same way people use Disqus on blogs. I’ll note that in practice, I find Hypothes.is far faster than Disqus ever was. I’ve yet to see anyone offloading the commenting functionality of their blog this way, but I’d be willing to bet dollars to donuts that someone could hack it together as a simple iframe or via the API pretty quickly and with solid results.

And naturally I’m missing many, potentially including some I’ve thought about before. Maybe worth checking the old Hypothes.is tag in my digital notebook?

If people have others, I’m enamored to hear them.

Replied to a tweet by Jon UdellJon Udell (Twitter)
Does this cast you as Dr. W. C. Minor in the story, albeit not in the same sort of mad man way to wordnik’s Sir James Murray? Seriously though, this is an awesome use case.
Read Project Naptha (projectnaptha.com)
Project Naptha automatically applies state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms on every image you see while browsing the web. The result is a seamless and intuitive experience, where you can highlight as well as copy and paste and even edit and translate the text formerly trapped within an image. The Tyger

What the hand dare seize the fire?

I find it so heartening that one can use Project Naptha to highlight, copy and paste, and even edit and translate text formerly trapped within an image.

I’m further impressed that it also works with Hypothes.is!
–December 01, 2019 at 09:40AM

Though upon revisiting, it seems like the text is temporarily highlighted on Hypothesis (which probably only works with Naptha installed), then disappears, and the annotation is shown as an orphan.

Apparently Naptha only acts as a middle layer to allow the OCR of the image and that without it, the fingerprinting process Hypothes.is uses can’t find it after the fact.

Perhaps Hypothes.is could recognize that the highlighted text is being supplied by a third-party layer and instead of orphaning the highlighted text, it could anchor the highlight to the associated image instead?
–December 01, 2019 at 09:44AM

Naptha, its current name, is drawn from an even more tenuous association. See, it comes from the fact that “highlighter” kind of sounds like “lighter”, and that naptha is a type of fuel often used for lighters. It was in fact one of the earliest codenames of the project, and brought rise to a rather fun little easter egg which you can play with by quickly clicking about a dozen times over some block of text inside a picture.

Now if only I could do this with my Hypothes.is annotations! Talk about highlighting!
–December 01, 2019 at 10:06AM

There is a class of algorithms for something called “Inpainting”, which is about reconstructing pictures or videos in spite of missing pieces. This is widely used for film restoration, and commonly found in Adobe Photoshop as the “Content-Aware Fill” feature.

This reminds me of a tool called asciinema that allows highlighting text within a video.
–December 01, 2019 at 10:13AM

Read Hypothesis Releases Gradebook Integration for Blackboard, Moodle, D2L & More by Jeremy Dean (web.hypothes.is/blog/)

The Hypothesis Logo, circled by logos for Blackboard Learn, D2L Brightspace, Instructure Canvas, Moodle, Sakai, & Schoology.

Last December, we released the Hypothesis LMS app, a tool that enables you to integrate collaborative web annotation for course readings in any LMS with single sign-on and automatic private annotation groups for each class. In August, we announced the Hypothesis app’s first LMS gradebook integration for Instructure Canvas. We are now pleased to announce gradebook integration for any LMS that supports IMS Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI), including not only Canvas, but also Blackboard, D2L Brightspace, Moodle, Sakai, and Schoology.

Read How to Compose an Annotation-based Tweet by Jon Udell|

Annotation is one way to remix the web, Twitter is another. The two approaches can play nicely together but, to make best use of the combination, it helps to understand what happens when you tweet a Hypothesis direct link.

Annotation example featuring Chris Aldrich

Oh, look Jon uses an annotation I made as an example in his post!
Annotated Journal of the First Voyage to America, 1492-1493 (Excerpt) by Christopher Columbus ( The Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature)
IN THE NAME OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST

I thought this was important all on its own. Did they put this before everything? Was he just really religious?–Tmoon95 annotation on September 9, 2015

This statement also has a lot to do with the culture of the time: The Tribunal of the Holy Office of the Inquisition (Spanish: Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisición), commonly known as the Spanish Inquisition (Inquisición española), was established in 1478 by Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile. It was intended to maintain Catholic orthodoxy in their kingdoms and to replace the Medieval Inquisition, which was under Papal control.

Recall that Ferdinand and Isabella were the reigning monarchs who funded Columbus’ voyages.

🔖 Drag and Drop a document

Bookmarked Doc Drop: Drag and drop a document to annotate it. (docdrop.org)

Works with .pdf, .doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .epub and .csv files.
.doc and .docx are converted to .pdf.
.xls and .xlsx are converted to .csv.

You can also annotate PDFs inside Google Drive by authorizing Hypothes.is within your Google account. Hypothes.is PDF Annotator will be listed under the "Open with" option for PDF files upon authorization. (Uninstall).

Scanned PDFs will be OCR’d
(please ensure text is horizontal).

The OCR service uses Tesseract, an open source library.
You may have better results using a professional tool (tutorial). The annotation functionality is enabled by Hypothes.is.
The code for this site is open source.

This is a personal project to explore different ideas and is maintained by Dan Whaley. I’d be delighted to hear any feedback at @dwhly.

The intention is to keep the site up and running, but no guarantee around the preservation of documents is made.
As an aside, annotations against PDFs or EPUBs with your Hypothes.is account, are discoverable on that PDF or EPUB regardless of its location (Background). As long as you have the original PDF somewhere, you'll always be able to see your annotations on it with Hypothes.is.