👓 The Instagram-Husband Revolution | The Atlantic

Read The Instagram-Husband Revolution (The Atlantic)
The men behind the camera are ready to step into the spotlight.

Good for them for helping out their wives this way. Interestingly not odd that they move into the sub-influencers game themselves though.

👓 I Lived Like Reese Witherspoon for a Week and All I Got Was This Ham | Vulture

Read I Lived Like Reese Witherspoon for a Week and All I Got Was This Ham by Rachel Handler (Vulture)
A New York Jewess goes south for the holidays.

A great send up of Reece Witherspoon’s book. Such great satire, I wish Rachel was writing on more than just culture and film.

Twenty-something: A time in one’s life when it’s passingly acceptable that most of one’s dishware be of the plastic souvenir sort.

“Look ma! They stack AND I get cheaper refills.”

Thirty-something: A time when one has decommissioned all of one’s souvenir cups only to replace them with twice the amount of mismatched children’s sippy cups and plastic-ware.

“Where’s the lid to this?”

Fourty-something: A time to help a new budding teenager begin their own addiction to plastic souvenir cups.

“This dinosaur cup has such an awesome swirly straw and it glows in the dark!”

When Couples Fight Over Books | WSJ

Read When Couples Fight Over Books (WSJ)
People feel possessive of books because they help form our beliefs. How couples keep, display and discard books can be the stuff of heated debate.

After bickering with her husband nonstop for a week recently, Amber Fallon made a huge sacrifice for love. Four books.

This represented an appeasement in the ongoing book battles between Ms. Fallon and her husband, John. Both are big readers. Both own many books. His are alphabetized in a floor-to-ceiling bookcase in their bedroom. Hers take up three of his shelves, fill their home office and stack precariously in a “To Be Read” pile in a corner.

When books start to spill onto tables and countertops, Mr. Fallon—who gives away many of his books once he’s read them—demands answers. Why does his wife need two copies of the same title? Why keep ones she’s already read? “She believes in some form of immortality by having books around,” says Mr. Fallon, 39, a systems technician.
Continue reading “When Couples Fight Over Books | WSJ”