👓 Trio | Khürt Williams

Read TRIO by Khürt Williams (islandinthenet.com)

We’ve all heard of the rules of thirds but have you heard of the rule of three?

The rule of three is a writing principle that suggests that a trio of events or characters is more humorous, satisfying, or effective than other numbers in [the] execution of the story and engaging the reader. The reader or audience of this form of text is also thereby more likely to remember the information conveyed. This is because having three entities combines both brevity and rhythm with having the smallest amount of information to create a pattern. It makes the author or speaker appear knowledgeable while being both simple and catchy.WIKIPEDIA

Although a writing principle, one of my photography instructors, Loren Fisher, has suggested using this principle when composing images with more than one object of focus.

I’ve been trying to use this principle in my images.

This image was captured earlier this year near South Street Seaport during my lunch break. I used my Fuji X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR and shot using an ACROS Film Simulation Recipe by Ritchie Roesch.

Some interesting theory about both photography and narrative structure with a great little photo to underline it all.

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👓 Preparing a conference talk | Adactio

Read Preparing a conference talk by Jeremy Keith (adactio.com)
There are two aspects to preparing a talk: the content and the presentation. I like to keep the preparation of those two parts separate. It’s kind of like writing: instead of writing and editing at the same time, it’s more productive to write any old crap first (to get it out of your head) and then go back and edit—“write drunk and edit sober”. Separating out those two mindsets allows you to concentrate on the task at hand. So, to begin with, I’m not thinking about how I’m going to present the material at all. I’m only concerned with what I want to say.

A good and timely outline here as I begin laying out some ideas for a talk in November!

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