📖 5.0% done with Complex Analysis by Elias M. Stein & Rami Shakarchi

📖 5.0% done with Complex Analysis by Elias M. Stein & Rami Shakarchi

A nice beginning overview of where they’re going and philosophy of the book. Makes the subject sound beautiful and wondrous, though they do use the word ‘miraculous’ which is overstepping a bit in almost any math book whose history is over a century old.

Their opening motivation for why complex instead of just real:

However, everything changes drastically if we make a natural, but misleadingly simple-looking assumption on f: that it is differentiable in the complex sense. This condition is called holomorphicity, and it shapes most of the theory discussed in this book.

We shall start our study with some general characteristic properties of holomorphic functions, which are subsumed by three rather miraculous facts:

  1. Contour integration: If f is holomorphic in \Omega , then for appropriate closed paths in \Omega

    \int\limits_\gamma f(z)\,\mathrm{d}z = 0.

  2. Regularity: If f is holomorphic, then f is indefinitely differentiable.
  3. Analytic continuation: If f and g are holomorphic functions in \Omega which are equal in an arbitrarily small disc in \Omega , then f = g everywhere in \Omega .

This far into both books, I think I’m enjoying the elegance of Stein/Shakarchi better than Ahlfors.

📖 61.0% done with Carioca Fletch (Fletch #7) by Gregory McDonald

📖 61.0% done with Carioca Fletch (Fletch #7) by Gregory McDonald

The plot seems to have slowed down significantly since the opening, but is just finally getting moving again.

📖 14.0% done with Carioca Fletch (Fletch #7) by Gregory McDonald

📖 14.0% done with Carioca Fletch (Fletch #7) by Gregory McDonald

An interesting start with a nice dash of the cultural part of what it means to be a Brazilian to set the stage of what is to come in the book. The reader is nicely made to feel the cultural clash of American and Brazilian along with the frustration Fletch surely feels.

I now proudly own all of the data from my Tumbr posts on my own domain. #Indieweb #ownyourdata #PESOS

I now proudly own all of the data from my Tumbr posts on my own domain. #Indieweb #ownyourdata #PESOS

🔖 Want to read: Carioca Fletch (Fletch #7) by Gregory McDonald

🔖 Want to read: Carioca Fletch (Fletch #7) by Gregory McDonald

The Rio Olympics reminded me that I’d gotten Carioca Fletch to read back in the 80’s and never got around to it, so I thought I’d come back and revisit the series.

Dave Brubeck – Time Series

Listened to Time Series by Dave Brubeck

Including Time Out, Time Further Out, Time Changes, Countdown: Time in Outer Space, and Time In, this series of albums commonly known as the Time Series from Dave Brubeck and the Dave Brubeck Quartet is a masterclass in how important time is in music as well as how it can evolve.

Here you’ll find Brubeck experimenting with time signatures including recordings of “Take Five” in 5/4 time, “Pick Up Sticks” in 6/4, “Unsquare Dance” in 7/4, “World’s Fair” in 13/4, and “Blue Rondo à la Turk” in 9/8.

This is a great way to spend the day/night when you have some active listening time.

📅 WordCamp Orange County 2016

RSVPed Attending WordCamp Orange County 2016
WordCamp Orange County is a great place to learn meet, talk, and immerse yourself in everything WordPress. From the absolute beginner to the hardest of hardcore developers, WordCamp Orange County will have something for you. WordCamp Orange County is going to bring you two tracks of sessions and workshops to satisfy designers and developers, bloggers and beginners, business owners and burgeoning writers. Are you ready for the summer? July 9-10, 2016
@ocwordcamp
#WCOC16

🔖 Paper: Paging Through History by Mark Kurlansky

Bookmarked Paper: Paging Through History by Mark Kurlansky (Amazon.com)
Paper is one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past two millennia, the ability to produce it in ever more efficient ways has supported the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art; it has formed the foundation of civilizations, promoting revolutions and restoring stability. One has only to look at history’s greatest press run, which produced 6.5 billion copies of Máo zhuxí yulu, Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-tung (Zedong)―which doesn’t include editions in 37 foreign languages and in braille―to appreciate the range and influence of a single publication, in paper. Or take the fact that one of history’s most revered artists, Leonardo da Vinci, left behind only 15 paintings but 4,000 works on paper. And though the colonies were at the time calling for a boycott of all British goods, the one exception they made speaks to the essentiality of the material; they penned the Declaration of Independence on British paper. Now, amid discussion of “going paperless”―and as speculation about the effects of a digitally dependent society grows rampant―we’ve come to a world-historic juncture. Thousands of years ago, Socrates and Plato warned that written language would be the end of “true knowledge,” replacing the need to exercise memory and think through complex questions. Similar arguments were made about the switch from handwritten to printed books, and today about the role of computer technology. By tracing paper’s evolution from antiquity to the present, with an emphasis on the contributions made in Asia and the Middle East, Mark Kurlansky challenges common assumptions about technology’s influence, affirming that paper is here to stay. Paper will be the commodity history that guides us forward in the twenty-first century and illuminates our times.
🔖 Marked as “want to read” Paper: Paging Through History by Mark Kurlansky (W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition, May 10, 2016; ISBN: 9780393239614)